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Why study Master of Laws?

The Master of Laws (LLM) program has been developed to offer maximum flexibility and choice for law graduates, with a broad range of subjects that enables students to tailor the Masters degree to their interests and professional needs. Students investigate contemporary legal issues from both international and local perspectives.

The Monash LLM is ideal for law graduates wanting to develop in-depth knowledge of a particular legal area or those wanting to advance their professional expertise in a current area of practice. This course also provides opportunities for independent legal research.

Domestic

Entry requirements

View entry requirements and applications for domestic students

Duration

1 year full-time
4 years part-time

Fees for 2014

Fees are subject to change annually.

Commonwealth supported place (CSP)
Commonwealth supported place not offered for this course.

Domestic fee per 48 credit points
48 credit points represents a standard full-time course load for a year
$ 28,900 AUD

The Student Services and Amenities Fee applies to some students each calendar year.

Intakes

Throughout the year

Attendances

  • On-campus at City: full-time, part-time

Faculty

Faculty of Law

Course code: 0068

CRICOS code: 001439E

Find out more

Enquire nowApply nowEntry requirements

Contact

1800 MONASH
(1800 666 274)
Faculty of Law
www.law.monash.edu

International

Entry requirements

View entry requirements and applications for international students

Duration

1 year full-time

Fees for 2014

Fees are subject to change annually.

International fee per 48 credit points
48 credit points represents a standard full-time course load for a year
$ 37,700 AUD

Intakes

First Semester (March), Second Semester (July)

Attendances

  • On-campus at City: full-time

Faculty

Faculty of Law

Course code: 0068

CRICOS code: 001439E

Find out more

Enquire nowApply nowEntry requirements

Contact

International Student Enquiries
Telephone: +61 3 9903 4788
Online Enquiry: Click Enquire Now

Admissions information for domestic students

Entry requirements

Minimum entrance requirements

1 A JD or a bachelor honours degree in Law, or an equivalent qualification; or

2 A bachelor degree in Law (or equivalent) plus either a graduate diploma in Law, a graduate certificate in Law, or an equivalent postgraduate qualification; or

3 A bachelor degree in Law (or equivalent) plus sufficient relevant work-based or other learning to together constitute the equivalent of one of the above qualifications*

4 A bachelor degree in Law (or equivalent) plus admission to practice as an Australian lawyer

Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record, with a credit average (or equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not have a credit average will need to have at least two years of relevant work experience, although the required period may be shorter where the work experience has been supplemented by other relevant learning.

  • For the purposes of satisfying these requirements, other learning may include, but is not confined to, learning in the context of other non-law degrees. Please ensure that you provide results transcripts (where applicable) and an explanation of how this learning has advanced your knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

English requirements

See http://policy.monash.edu.au/policy-bank/academic/education/admissions/admissions-coursework-courses-units-of-study-procedures.html,

Students who have completed their secondary schooling in a language other than English may need to satisfy English language requirements by completing an English Test.. The section referring to "English Tests" is replaced by Overall Academic IELTS of 7.0; with Reading 6.5, Listening 6.5, Writing 6.5 and Speaking 6.5

Extra requirements

To qualify as a bachelor honours degree for the purpose of admission, a degree must generally be a minimum of four years duration and include a semester length research component.

A cognate discipline is a related discipline relevant to the specific area of specialisation. (For example a student applying to enrol in the Master of Workplace and Employment Law specialisation would need to have completed a degree which includes an area of specialisation or groups of units relevant to the workplace and employment context.)

Work-based or other learning is relevant to establish advanced knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work. This includes learning in the context of completion of legal professional admission requirements.

To adequately demonstrate your work experience, please ensure that you have outlined your job title, the organisation name and department and the type, the number of employees, the duration of your tenure and the type (e.g. full time, part-time, casual), a description of the tasks for which you were responsible and the nature and extent of the skills they require, including any research skills. You are required to submit one original employment reference which supports your CV (if you were self-employed, you should submit original references from two clients). You should also provide a URL of your organisation.

University entrance requirements

Minimum entrance requirements for admission to Monash University Australia.

Applications

Semester one (March)

Apply directly to Monash

Semester two (July)

Apply directly to Monash

Admissions information for international students

Entry requirements

International entry requirements

1 A JD or a bachelor honours degree in Law, or an equivalent qualification; or

2 A bachelor degree in Law (or equivalent) plus either a graduate diploma in Law, a graduate certificate in Law, or an equivalent postgraduate qualification; or

3 A bachelor degree in Law (or equivalent) plus sufficient relevant work-based other learning to together constitute the equivalent of one of the above qualifications

Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record with a credit average (or equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not have a credit average will need to have at least two years of relevant work experience, although the required period may be shorter where the work experience has been supplemented by other relevant learning.

English requirements for international students

Overall Academic IELTS of 7.0; with Reading 6.5, Listening 6.5, Writing 6.5 and Speaking 6.5

Paper-based TOEFL 587 (TWE of 4.5); or Internet-based TOEFL Overall 94 with Writing 24+ , Speaking and Listening 20, and Reading 19).

See http://policy.monash.edu.au/policy-bank/academic/education/admissions/admissions-coursework-courses-units-of-study-procedures.html

The section referring to "English Tests" is replaced by Overall IELTS of 7.0; with Reading 6.5, Listening 6.5, Writing 6.5 and Speaking 6.5

Special entry requirements

To qualify as a bachelor honours degree for the purpose of admission, a degree must generally be a minimum of four years duration and include a semester length research component.

A cognate discipline is a related discipline relevant to the specific area of specialisation. (For example a student applying to enrol in the Master of Workplace and Employment Law specialisation would need to have completed a degree which includes an area of specialisation or groups of units relevant to the workplace and employment context.)

Work-based or other learning is relevant to the extent that it has contributed to the acquisition of advanced knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

To adequately demonstrate your work experience, please ensure that you have outlined your job title, the organisation name and department and the type, the number of employees, the duration of your tenure and the type (e.g. full time, part-time, casual), a description of the tasks for which you were responsible and the nature and extent of the skills they require, including any research skills. You are required to submit one original employment reference which supports your CV (if you were self-employed, you should submit original references from two clients). You should also provide a URL of your organisation.

To adequately demonstrate other learning please include results transcripts or other proof of satisfactory completion (where applicable) and an explanation of how the specific studies have advanced your knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

University entrance requirements

Minimum entrance requirements for admission to Monash University Australia.

Applications

Semester one (March)

Apply directly to Monash

Semester two (July)

Apply directly to Monash

Enrolment obligation

International students enrolling in a CRICOS-registered course can study no more than 25% of their course by distance and/or online learning. Students cannot enrol exclusively in distance and/or online learning study in any compulsory study period. See standard 9.4 of The National Code 2007.

Study areas

LAW

The law underpins civilisation, and governs how we act and interact. Its study involves both the intellectual challenge of arguing from evidence and the creative challenges of problem-solving and analysis. Its practitioners demonstrate a precise yet fluent use of language, a focus on justice and fairness, and advanced thinking, reasoning and expressive abilities. They work in the legal profession as solicitors, barristers and judicial officers, as well as in corporations, the government, NGOs, law reform agencies and many other industries.

COMMERCIAL LAW

From breaking down simple contracts to building up complex companies, commercial law explores how the law intersects with property, trade and commerce. It's an enormously broad area of law that stretches across a wide range of topics - such as intellectual property, taxation and finance, dispute resolution and construction law - in both the domestic and international arenas. Studying commercial law a springboard from which you can launch or further your career in areas that include corporate law, competition law, banking and finance law, and tax.

HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

Human rights law covers a wide range of traditional and emerging topics, from Indigenous and children's rights to issues relating to terrorism, migration and encroachments on privacy. Our students critically engage in topical human rights issues confronting governments, international bodies, individuals and corporations. Some of the most highly respected human rights academics in the country, as well as highly qualified visiting experts, teach in our program. And with the faculty's support of the Castan Centre for Human Rights Law, Monash University is at the forefront of the movement to create a human rights law culture in Australia.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Intellectual property is a rapidly evolving area of law focused on protecting intangible, original, creative works - the ideas dreamed up by authors, composers, designers, inventors and others like them. This area of study focuses on the fundamental principles of all of the key areas of intellectual property law, practice and policy, and also address advanced issues, including local and international developments in the law. Our extensive range of intellectual property units allows students to qualify for Patent and Trade Mark Attorney accreditation.

INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW

The law does not always confine its activities to national borders. This area of study provides what practitioners increasingly need - advanced legal knowledge across a broad spectrum of global issues, from human rights law, criminal law and international commercial law to comparative law and international trade and financial law. Our staff carry international reputations in their areas, and we frequently host visiting international experts. This study area is carefully constructed to provide an outstanding exposure to the theory and practice of international and comparative law.

REGULATORY STUDIES

Regulation is central to an understanding of law, economics and public policy; it permeates social and economic organisation. Yet the concept is complex. Its mechanisms range from rules, codes, monitoring and sanctions, through to economic penalties and rewards to education and information. This unique and emerging discipline addresses the nature, extent and implications of the regulatory environment in a broad, cross-disciplinary approach. It both links and transcends the boundaries between economics, law, politics, criminology, sociology, psychology, organisational theory and public administration. Students with a core set of ideas, theories and skills relevant to regulatory practice and the management of regulatory challenges.

WORKPLACE AND EMPLOYMENT LAW

At its most basic, this challenging area of study focuses on the relationship between employer and employee. It encompasses employment and labour law, including corporate management, human resources, trade unions and employer groups. As a student, you'll cover a diverse range of topics, including collective bargaining agreements, individual contracts, occupational health and safety, electronic workplace law, international human rights and discrimination.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT LAW

Local government law embraces a suite of topics - Australian legal and political institutions, local government structure and power, regulation and compliance, planning, privacy, construction and the environment. It allows student to focus on current issues relevant to middle and senior management in local government and the public sector more generally.