units

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Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Monash University Handbook 2014 Undergraduate - Units

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6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Chantal Perera

Synopsis

This unit explores the foundation of the paramedic clinician and introduces the roles expected of paramedics as clinicians. The unit will utilise a model of paramedic clinical competence as a framework to develop the foundations and skills of clinical approach, clinical problem solving, and clinical decision-making. The essential clinical skills will be developed in the clinical laboratory and simulation settings. A satisfactory level in all these essential clinical skills will be required before students can proceed with their course. The context of paramedic clinical practice will be provided by supervised clinical experience with emergency ambulance services.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a standardised clinical approach to the assessment and care of patients in the community;
  2. Develop and describe communication theories and models of relevance to paramedic practice;
  3. Identify models of communication as they apply to language, interpersonal, non-verbal and intercultural context;
  4. Recognise appropriate professional and teamwork behaviours in the health settings associated with this unit;
  5. Describe the barriers to effective communication and patient assessment within paramedic practice and how emotions and culture can interfere with decision-making;
  6. Reflect on their performance in the clinical setting to identify the internal and external factors influencing clinical decision making;
  7. Demonstrate appropriate professional behaviours and provide peer review within simulated learning environments.
  8. Discuss and demonstrate the appropriate and safe use of manual handling practices and equipment whilst caring for patients.

Assessment

Mid-semester test (1 hour): 20%
Clinical portfolio, hurdle requirement: 30%
Written exam (2 hour): 50%
Objective Structured Clinical Examination (Pass/Fail)

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must complete the clinical portfolio at the pass grade AND pass the written examination AND pass the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. 80% attendance at tutorials is mandatory to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Bachelor of
Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Paul Jennings

Synopsis

This unit introduces population health, public health and primary health care principles to the analysis of community based emergency health (CBEH). Population health principles are applied to illness prevention and health promotion.
The use of health datasets in population and public health is also discussed. The basis of science, knowledge and evidence is explored along with the principles and use of evidence-based practice in the CBEH setting.
Students are encouraged to develop their capacity for enquiry, research, critical thought, critical appraisal and analysis through the semester. Information technology is used to access and interrogate the multitude of health datasets.

Outcomes

  1. Outline the essential features of the Australian Healthcare System
  2. Describe the essential features of population health, contemporary public health, and primary health care, and relate them to community-based emergency health care
  3. Explain the concepts of science, knowledge and truth, scientific method, research, and evaluation.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the core elements of a scholarly approach to investigations.
  5. Develop the ability to use information technology to access resources relating to community-based emergency health care.
  6. Demonstrate critical appraisal of the literature related to aspects of emergency care practice.
  7. Outline the epidemiological approaches to community based emergency health using examples of contemporary emergency health issues
  8. Develop an understanding and awareness of inequalities in the community and their impact on health status and for the provision of adequate community-based emergency health services
  9. Describe the importance of clinical research and the role of the paramedic in research that informs clinical practice.
  10. Outline the principles of evidence-based practice in determining the evidence and transmitting theory to practice in the setting of CBEH.

Assessment

Examination (2 hour): 40%
Portfolio: 60%

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or
Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Jaime Wallis

Synopsis

This unit uses the framework of human development throughout the lifespan to identify health and, specifically, emergency health issues at various stages of the lifespan. Students will investigate the roles of paramedics and allied health professionals in assessing human development and maintaining health across the lifespan and will explore issues relating to death and grieving. Included in this unit will be clinical visits to selected agencies to provide clinical context to the theoretical background.

Outcomes

  1. Describe the physical, personal, psychological and social milestones of human development throughout the lifespan.
  2. Recognise the impact of ethnicity, culture and race on human development.
  3. Communicate effectively with individuals across the lifespan within an appropriate developmental framework.
  4. Identify common acute and chronic health issues that occur across the lifespan.
  5. Apply contemporary theories of development to specific health issues across the lifespan.
  6. Identify essential activities and information regarding health promotion to meet the needs of individuals across the lifespan.
  7. Summarise theoretical perspectives on grieving and loss.

Assessment

Written assignment (2000 words): 35%
Examination (2 hours): 45%
Community visit portfolio: 20%

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must attend the community visit AND successfully complete the community visit portfolio. 80% attendance at tutorials is mandatory to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, small group exercises, and field trips.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Peter Jurkovsky

Synopsis

Law, Ethics and Professionalism will provide Bachelor of Emergency Health students with a sound basis for their legal and ethical practice within a chosen profession. The unit is divided into three distinct themes which blend together to assist in their understanding of legal principles, the application of legal standards, assessment and application of ethical practices while analysing the overarching concepts of professionalism in a challenging and continually developing area of health practice.

The unit will offer a broad range of teaching and learning strategies to accommodate the variety of participants in a non-clinical setting with an emphasis in supporting students in these activities. A combination of a prescribed text written specifically for the discipline and referral articles that encompass a wider field of practice will be used in conjunction with lectures, tutorials, online discussion and research tasks. A particularly important area of activity within the unit will be applying the principles in contextualised scenarios that relate directly to paramedic practice to ensure students consider and reflect upon areas of their professional practice, beyond the purely clinical environment.

Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a requisite level of knowledge of the Australian legal system and its principles whilst also exhibiting an understanding of the requirements of the law in professional paramedic practice.
  2. Identify particularly important legislation, cases and legal concepts while applying their principles to professional paramedic practice.
  3. Identify the basis and application of the fundamental rights and responsibilities of all involved in pre-hospital care while assessing principles of personal autonomy, consent and refusal of treatment by discussing and analysing difficult facts scenarios within the health care paradigm.
  4. Discuss and analyse the significance of regulation and registration in paramedic practice while assessing the various ways in which registration authorities receive, consider and adjudicate on issues affecting professional health practice.
  5. Identify and assess the issues associated with surrogate and end of life decision making in health care generally while analysing the unique requirements in the pre-hospital environment.
  6. Assess and practically apply the requirements of accurate record keeping, confidentiality and mandatory reporting in health care generally and paramedic practice specifically.
  7. Identify and discuss the essential ethical and bioethical theories while applying them to the role of the paramedic.
  8. Accurately describe contemporary models of professionalism and their application to the role of the paramedic while practically applying the appropriate models in problem based scenarios.

Assessment

Research paper (50%)
Final examination (50%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

The unit is structured around two, two-hour lectures and one one-hour tutorial each week (Weeks 2 - 11 inclusive). In addition to attending lectures and tutorials it is expected that students complete a minimum of 1 hour of personal study per one hour of contact time (approximately 10 hours per week) in order to satisfy the reading and assignment expectations.

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (3445)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ms Jaime Wallis

Synopsis

This unit builds on the foundation of the paramedic clinician and expands the roles expected of paramedics as clinicians. The unit will utilise a model of paramedic clinical competence as a framework to develop the foundations and skills of clinical approach, clinical problem solving, clinical decision-making, and scene management. The unit will develop scientific knowledge and understanding of selected concepts of disease/injury and require students to integrate this knowledge in the clinical laboratory and simulation settings. The unit uses a patient-centred safety focus and is designed to assist students to understand the scope of practice and clinical pathways available in community based emergency healthcare.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. demonstrate a standardised clinical approach to the assessment and care of patients in the community presenting with an injury/illness;
  2. describe the clinical pathways processes used to triage individuals to appropriate care and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these processes;
  3. locate and evaluate the evidence-base that informs the paramedic management of common health emergencies;
  4. apply scientific knowledge of selected pathophysiological processes to the assessment and care if individuals with acute and chronic health problems;
  5. demonstrate the required standard in each of the core clinical skills of physical examination, clinical decision-making and scene management at the standard required of a novice practitioner;
  6. investigate and describe variables within the work environment, scope of practice, teamwork and community that contribute towards the successful delivery of care within emergency medical service settings;
  7. reflect on their performance in the clinical setting to identify the internal and external factors influencing clinical decision making in an acute health crisis;
  8. demonstrate appropriate professional behaviours and provide peer review within simulated learning environments.

Assessment

Mid-semester test (1 hour): 20%
Clinical portfolio - Hurdle requirement: 30%
Written exam (2 hour): 50%
Objective Structured Clinical Examination (Pass/Fail)

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must complete the clinical portfolio at the pass grade AND pass the written examination. 80% attendance at tutorials is mandatory to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, practical small group exercises.

Prerequisites

Prohibitions

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ms Janet Curtis

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units.
The unit covers commonly encountered chronic, acute, and life threatening respiratory-related clinical problems across the lifespan. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies. The scope of the unit includes the development of skills needed to provide general health care as well as care at an advanced life support level.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, pathology and clinical manifestations of acute and chronic respiratory conditions commonly encountered in paramedic practice across the lifespan.
  2. Locate and evaluate evidence that informs paramedic clinical practice guidelines used to care for patients with respiratory conditions.
  3. Demonstrate systematic patient assessment and formulation of a statement describing the individual's alteration in health status.
  4. Demonstrate the planning and implementation of care and accurately document and communicate the care provided.
  5. Demonstrate effective communication and collaboration with patients, families and other members of the multidisciplinary health care team.
  6. Evaluate the appropriateness and efficacy of care in relation to the special needs of patients across the lifespan and the needs of patients, family and carers from Indigenous and culturally diverse backgrounds.
  7. Relate the pharmacology of drugs used by paramedics for the management of respiratory conditions to drug indications and actions.
  8. Reflect on the diagnostic reasoning, clinical problem solving and clinical decision making processes that influence the care of patients with respiratory conditions in order to evaluate and justify management decisions and identify threats to patient safety.
  9. Describe the special features and trends in the Australian health system relating to prevention and management of respiratory conditions.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate professional behaviours and provide peer review within simulated learning environments.

Assessment

Mid semester test 1 (1 hour): 20%
Clinical Portfolio: 30%
Written examination (2 hours): 50%
Case simulation (30 minutes): pass/fail (hurdle)

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must pass the written examination AND pass the case simulation. 80% attendance at paramedic skills laboratories is mandatory to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)or the Bachelor of
Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Mr Damien Dambrosi

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units.
The unit addresses injury and injury prevention across the lifespan, with specific reference to commonly encountered acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions, injury. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies. The scope of the unit includes developing the skills needed to provide general health care as well as care at an advanced life support level.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health and pathology related to injuries and commonly encountered in paramedic practice.
  2. Describe criteria used to identify major trauma and demonstrate the application of pre-hospital trauma triage guidelines.
  3. Identify and evaluate evidence that informs paramedic clinical practice guidelines used to care for patients with injury.
  4. Relate the pharmacology of drugs and fluids used by paramedics for the management of injury to drug indications and actions.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to integrate the theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to the assessment and management of patients with injury in real time simulation including clinical problem solving and clinical decision taking, professionalism, safety, documentation, communication and teamwork.
  6. Demonstrate the management of patients, their carers and bystanders in situations of acute injury in a sociological and culturally sensitive context.

Assessment

End of semester written examination (2 hour): 40%
Clinical Portfolio or written assignment (2000 words): 40%
Mid-semester written examination (1 hour): 20%
Scenario-based clinical examination (30 minutes): pass/fail (hurdle)

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must pass the written examination AND pass the scenario-based clinical examination.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, practical simulation

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Summer semester A 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Mr Peter Jurkovsky

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician. It will build on a model of paramedic clinical competence developed in prerequisite units and will provide the context to support the implementation of knowledge and skills necessary for effective patient care. Students will have the opportunity to practice and develop their clinical skills in the management of patients with acute health
conditions through clinical placements with ambulance service providers and other health agencies. The unit will also place an emphasis on the insightfulness that is required to deliver quality patient care through a range of reflective tasks that challenge the student to consider their practice from a variety of alternative perspectives.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Evaluate their clinical knowledge and identify clinical learning opportunities that may improve their ability to communicate with and care for patients.
  2. Recognise their role in the community emergency health setting and display appropriate professional and teamwork behaviours.
  3. Perform appropriate paramedic clinical tasks under supervision in the community emergency health setting.
  4. Apply relevant theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to the care of patients within the community emergency health setting.
  5. Work as an effective team member with paramedics and health care professionals to provide appropriate patient care.
  6. Demonstrate a culturally sensitive approach to their own reactions and those of patients and their families to acute illness or injury.
  7. Reflect on their performance in the clinical setting to identify the adequacy of their judgements and the factors influencing clinical decision making.

Assessment

Clinical skills logbook: Pass/Fail
Reflective Case Reports (3 x 1000 words each) - (75%)
Discussion Forums (Forums (submit 5 x meaningful discussion post of at least 200 words each ) - 25%)
Hurdles: A pass grade must be achieved on all assessment tasks.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

The equivalent of 4 weeks full time supervised clinical placement - a total of 160 hours. The unit is conducted over the `Summer A' semester so that the essential professional requirement of the supervised clinical practice can be met.

Prerequisites

Must have passed on of (BEH1011, NUR1102) AND Must have passed 2 (BEH2012 and BEH2022)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health(Paramedic)
or
Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health(Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Peter Jurkovsky

Synopsis

The unit establishes an extended scope of practice in the pre-hospital environment where the paramedic explores a range of diseases and conditions and deals with their consequences in out-of-hospital situations. The content of the unit and the practical application of skills will prepare the paramedic for a potential extended care role within a variety of settings in communities and workplaces, locally and internationally.

Outcomes

  1. Evaluate a range of local and international disease aetiologies and epidemiologies that impact on a community setting and the role pre-hospital professionals play in addressing these diseases.
  2. Analyse and apply the practices of advanced prescribing practice, health promotion, health assessment, discharge planning and a range of treatment schedules.
  3. Outline the clinical presentations, signs and symptoms and treatments associated with various ailments, diseases and conditions commonly encountered in the community practice setting.
  4. Consider the purpose of pathology collection and testing, including prohibited substance testing, and the common types of pathology testing procedures that the paramedic may perform in a community setting.
  5. Evaluate and apply the general principles of wound closure including the administration of local anaesthesia, assess the types of wounds that may be sealed using suturing techniques and become proficient in the correct procedure for suturing, including pre/post procedure care of the wound.
  6. Assess and apply the management of a range of impact and sporting based injuries within the community care setting.
  7. Assess and apply the management of a range of acute and chronic geriatric and paediatric conditions that arise in the community care setting.
  8. Develop strategies targeted at leadership and education to inform change in models of paramedic practice to meet evolving community needs.

Assessment

Clinical portfolio (50%)
Final examination (50%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

The unit is structured around one three-hour lecture and one two-hour practical session each week (Practical sessions: weeks 2 - 11 inclusive). In addition to attending lectures and practical sessions, it is expected that students complete a minimum of 1 hour of personal study per one hour of contact time (approximately 10 hours per week) in order to satisfy the reading and portfolio expectations.

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Brett Williams

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units. The unit covers commonly encountered chronic, acute, and life threatening cardiovascular problems across the lifespan. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies. The scope of the unit includes the development of skills needed to provide general health care as well as care at an advanced life support level.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, pathology and clinical manifestations of acute and chronic cardiovascular conditions commonly encountered in paramedic practice across the lifespan;
  2. Locate and evaluate evidence that informs paramedic care for patients with cardiovascular conditions;
  3. Demonstrate systematic patient assessment and formulation of a statement describing the individual's alteration in health status;
  4. Demonstrate the planning and implementation of care and accurately document and communicate the care provided;
  5. Demonstrate effective communication and collaboration with patients, families and other members of the multidisciplinary health care team;
  6. Evaluate the appropriateness and efficacy of care in relation to the special needs of patients across the lifespan and the needs of patients, family and carers from Indigenous and culturally diverse backgrounds;
  7. Relate the pharmacology of drugs used by paramedics for the management of cardiovascular conditions to drug indications and actions;
  8. Reflect on the diagnostic reasoning, clinical problem solving and clinical decision making processes that influence the care of patients with cardiovascular conditions in order to evaluate and justify management decisions and identify threats to patient safety;
  9. Describe the special features and trends in the Australian health system relating to prevention and management of cardiovascular disease;
  10. Demonstrate appropriate professional behaviours and provide peer review within simulated learning environments.

Assessment

Mid semester test 1 (1 hour): 20%
Clinical Portfolio: 30% - Hurdle requirement
Written examination (2 hours): 50%
Case simulation (30 minutes): pass/fail (hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health(Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health(Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Linda Ross

Synopsis

This unit aims to develop paramedic awareness and understanding of the cross-cultural and demographically diverse community groups they will encounter as primary health care providers, and extend their capacity to communicate, build rapport and meaningfully engage with these groups. Students will gain valuable community engagement and participation experience through structured volunteer placements within strategically selected private, public and indigenous health related settings. Students will actively participate within these facilities in all aspects of the care programs being delivered allowing them to develop communication, listening and teamwork and skills whilst acquiring an insight into community health issues. In addition students will explore the valuable role they play as health care professionals in educating the community about the paramedics' role, and contributing to patient understanding of medical emergencies and the range of health care services and options available to them. Finally, through their community participation students will be expected to identify real or perceived gaps within the community health sector and devise strategies to narrow those gaps and achieve better health outcomes.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the unique health concerns and requirements of the diverse population that paramedics care for within the community.
  2. Demonstrate an appreciation for the role interpersonal skills play in gaining patient trust and promoting better health outcomes.
  3. Identify ways in which community engagement can develop the scope of practice of the paramedics and enhance community relationships.
  4. Explore the role of the paramedic in developing community capability and awareness to better manage medical emergencies.
  5. Investigate the diverse needs of Indigenous Australians in the context of community based emergency health and identify ways in which the ambulance professional can enhance their awareness and participation in these needs.
  6. Propose and plan strategies designed to strengthen community relationships and promote initiatives to improve community health outcomes.

Assessment

Community health project (50%)
Volunteer Community participation portfolio (50%)
Volunteer Community participation (hurdle)
Hurdle requirement: To pass the unit the student must complete 50 hours of Volunteer community participation and attend at least 80% of tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Six hours per week involving community participation, lectures and tutorials.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health(Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health(Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedNot offered in 2014

6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Janet Curtis

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician who is able to assess and care for patients with mental health problems in the community. The unit addresses the epidemiology and history of mental health in Australia, and the features of care systems with particular emphasis on community based care. Acute and chronic medical mental health problems commonly encountered by paramedics are investigated.
The special needs of Indigenous persons and those from non-English speaking backgrounds are investigated.
The unit is case-based, integrating material from the five themes and the underpinning biomedical, social and clinical sciences, and including clinical skills, laboratory and simulation scenarios to develop essential communication, assessment and management clinical skills, and clinical problem solving and decision making competencies.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, natural history, pathology and clinical manifestations of mental illness commonly encountered in paramedic practice.
  2. Discuss ethical issues associated with the care of individuals with mental illness.
  3. Locate and evaluate the evidence-base that informs the paramedic management of acute and chronic mental health conditions across the lifespan.
  4. Communicate effectively with people who are experiencing disturbances of thoughts, feelings and behaviour.
  5. Demonstrate a mental status assessment as applied to paramedic practice.
  6. Interpret and apply legislation and clinical practice guidelines relating to the management of patients with mental health emergencies.
  7. Use a model of paramedic clinical competence to integrate and apply theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to the assessment and management of patients with mental health emergencies.
  8. Describe the range of therapeutic interventions and techniques used to manage mental health emergencies and identify which are appropriate for use in the community based emergency health setting.
  9. Identify the factors that contribute to the mental health of individuals within family units and apply this knowledge to the care of patients as well as families and

carers of individuals with mental health problems.

  1. Describe the role of the paramedic and allied health professionals in providing community-based emergency health care aimed at managing mental health emergencies within a given cultural context.
  2. Investigate the special needs of Indigenous persons and those from non-English speaking backgrounds during a mental health event.

Assessment

Written report (1000 words): 20%
Written assignment (2000 words): 40%
Examination (2 hour): 40%
Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Pass/Fail

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must pass the examination AND the objective structured clinical examination. 80% attendance at tutorials is mandatory to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials and small group exercises.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Malcolm Boyle

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units. The unit explores commonly encountered acute and chronic health emergencies, with a focus on pain management. Using a combination of case-based learning, clinical laboratory work and simulation, this unit will develop the essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision-making competencies in managing common health emergencies.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Locate and evaluate evidence that informs the paramedic management of acute and chronic medical conditions across the lifespan;
  2. Describe the epidemiology, population health, and pathology related to acute and chronic emergency medical conditions commonly encountered in paramedic practice;
  3. Describe the clinical manifestations of the selected medical conditions commonly

encountered in paramedic practice;

  1. Demonstrate the ability to integrate and apply theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to the assessment and management of patients with selected acute and chronic medical emergencies across the lifespan;
  2. Relate the pharmacology of drugs and fluids used by paramedics in the management of common medical conditions, including drug indications and actions.

Assessment

Written examination (2 hours) (40%)
Mid-semester test examination (1 hour) (30%)
Clinical portfolio (30%)
Scenario-based clinical examination (Pass/Fail)
Hurdle requirement: To pass this unit the student must pass the written examinations AND pass the scenario-based clinical examination

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures and simulation

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ms Chantal Perera

Synopsis

This unit develops the role of the paramedic as a clinical leader in the community with the focus on major incidents and disasters. The unit explores disaster planning, response and recovery, and the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic when managing multiple patients or a complex setting, during a major health emergency or during a humanitarian disaster.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the roles and responsibilities of paramedics, emergency services and other health agencies in relation to a multi-casualty or major incident.
  2. Compare and contrast the management of major incident in a rural, remote or complex setting compared to the urban environment.
  3. Describe the broader requirements of para medics, emergency services and other health agencies during disaster management, in particular the management of public health issues and logistics management.
  4. Describe the importance of clinical leadership and clinical governance in community based emergency health system during a major incident or disaster and the requirement of an integrated approach to a major incident.
  5. Analyse the contemporary structure of a major incident control system in the Australian context, and describe the role of the paramedic in major incidents and disasters, particularly compared to normal operations.
  6. Outline the role of the paramedic in emergency management planning and preparedness in local and international settings.
  7. Analyse the public health and humanitarian issues that may arise from major incidents and disasters.
  8. Demonstrate effective logistical management , patient triage or participation in a response team during a simulated mass-casualty situation or major incident.

Assessment

Written assignment (2000 words) (40%)
Clinical worksheets (20%)
Final examination (2 hours) (40%)
Major incident simulation (Pass/Fail) (hurdle)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials and clinical simulations is mandatory to pass this unit

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials and small group exercises.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Mal Boyle

Synopsis

The unit examines the principles of quality improvement, error and risk reduction, and clinical audit specifically relevant to CBEH.
Contemporary challenges in community-based emergency health needs are discussed in the context of the Australian healthcare system. The impact of politics, funding, and changing demography on future population health needs are explored. Students will investigate alternative methods of delivering community-based emergency health and discuss the future role of paramedics in meeting the health needs of an aging population.
The students will also apply research methods to the development of a research proposal that investigates a contemporary community based emergency health challenge.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. describe the principles of quality improvement, error and risk reduction, and clinical audit and apply these principles to the setting of community-based emergency health;
  2. utilise foundational knowledge of relevant research methods, to critically analyse selected community-based emergency health issues;
  3. identify and discuss contemporary challenges in community-based emergency health using local, national and international literature;
  4. apply the key principles of population health and public health system integration and co-ordination in the setting of selected community-based emergency health topics;
  5. outline the principle features of the Australian healthcare system and the impact of politics, funding, and changing demography on CBEH;
  6. analyse emergency health research priorities and apply these to community-based emergency health needs; 7. identify alternative methods of delivering community-based emergency health and discuss emerging opportunities for health professionals; and 8. outline the process for implementing research findings into CBEH practice.
  7. generate a research proposal using contemporary research methods.

Assessment

Assignment (1000 words) (25%)
Group poster presentation (1000 words) and oral presentation (30%)
Research proposal (3000 words) (40%)
Online participation (5%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures and tutorials

Prerequisites

Must have passed BEH2021 or NUR2001

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Full year 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Linda Ross

Synopsis

This unit provides the student with the opportunity to integrate knowledge acquired in their study in the primary emergency health care environment. The various tasks allow for the development of advanced skills with a focus on the study of health care within the emergency and community-based primary health care environments to assist in the transition to the workplace.

The unit will review of the graduate attributes needed to be an effective practitioner within the area of primary health care. The unit will focus on the knowledge, skills and values needed to practice as a paramedic. Each student is encouraged to identify their personal strengths, develop effective teamwork, situational awareness and personal skills through a process of reflection and continual improvement. Students will then apply this learning through simulations and actual workplace placements to enhance their role-readiness.

Outcomes

Upon completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Critically evaluate the standard paramedic clinical approach to the assessment and care of patients in the community, hospital or other related health setting;
  2. Analyse and appraise the communication techniques utilised to inform, instruct and empower patients to manage their care;
  3. Provide appropriate care for patients at an advanced level within the simulation environment and while under supervision in a range of authentic clinical settings;
  4. Demonstrate appropriate professional, inter-professional and teamwork behaviours within the community and primary health care settings;
  5. Work as an effective team member with fellow paramedics and other health care professionals to provide high level evidence-based patient care;
  6. Demonstrate a culturally sensitive approach to personal reactions and those of patients and their families or carers to acute or chronic illness and or injury;
  7. Critically reflect on performances in the clinical setting to identify the adequacy of personal judgements and the internal and external factors influencing clinical decision making and higher order thinking;
  8. Appraise the care given by peers within simulations and where possible within the authentic environments through public reflection to learn from these actions and inform future practice;
  9. Evaluate the experiences gained within the simulation environment through reflection and judge the influence these may have on future practice within the workplace.

Fieldwork

Throughout the study period each student will complete 32 placement days of eight to ten hours duration.

Assessment

2 x Case Studies (1500 words each): 30%
2 x Case Study Presentations: 20%
E-portfolio (2000 words): 20%
2 x Simulation Self-critiques (1000 words): 20%
Scenario Plan (1000 words): 10%
Clinical Skills Log Book: (Pass/Fail) Hurdle

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

The students will have a three hour workshop once a fortnight, complete thirty two clinical placement days and equivalent of one hour per fortnight on forum or formative assessment tasks.

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Students in the single degree must have successful completed all clinical units within the second year of the degree. If completing the double degree then all clinical units leading to the final year of that degree.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Mr Damien Dambrosi

Synopsis

The unit addresses the paramedic management of patients with critical care conditions
at the Advanced Life Support level. It will also introduce students to specialty situations, including extended care due to entrapment or environmental barriers, medical retrieval and inter-hospital transfers. The unit will include clinical skills laboratory and simulation scenarios to develop essential communication, assessment clinical problem solving, decision-making and management skills.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify and interpret the evidence-base supporting the paramedic management of critical care specialty conditions.
  2. Describe the epidemiology, natural history and pathology related to selected critical care specialty conditions.
  3. Describe the clinical highlights of the selected critical care specialty conditions commonly encountered by paramedics.
  4. Demonstrate the required standard in each of the core practical skills expected at the basic and advanced life support level relating to the assessment and care of patients with selected critical care specialty conditions.
  5. Explain the pharmacology of drugs commonly used in the management of selected critical care specialty conditions.
  6. Use a model of paramedic clinical competence to demonstrate the integration of theoretical knowledge and clinical skills in order to assess and manage patients with selected critical care specialty conditions in 'real time' work simulation using clinical problem solving and clinical decision making, patient safety, communication and teamwork skills.
  7. Explain the range of potential behaviour of patients, their carers and bystanders in situations of critical care specialty events.
  8. Demonstrate the required skills to facilitate care of patients in situations where access or egress problems mandate extended care in the environment in which the injury or illness occurred.
  9. Outline the structure of medical retrieval systems in Australia and the Asia-Pacific region and demonstrate the required clinical skills to participate in medical retrieval and/or inter-hospital transfers.

Assessment

Portfolio: 60%
Examination (2 hour): 40%
Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE): pass/fail
The examination and OSCE must be be passed (hurdle) to successfully complete this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

Prerequisites

Must have passed BEH3011 OR Must have passed one of BEH2012 or BEH2022

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health(Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health(Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Andrew Hart

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units. The unit covers commonly encountered toxicological and environmental emergencies across the lifespan. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies. The scope of the unit includes the development of skills needed to provide effective out-of-hospital care for patients experiencing health emergencies related to toxicological or environmental exposure.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, pathology and clinical manifestations of conditions associated with toxins and environmental exposure encountered in paramedic practice across the lifespan;
  2. Locate and evaluate evidence that informs paramedic clinical practice guidelines used to care for patients with toxicological and environmental conditions;
  3. Demonstrate systematic patient assessment and formulation of a statement describing the individual's alteration in health status;
  4. Demonstrate the planning and implementation of care and accurately document and communicate the care provided;
  5. Demonstrate effective communication and collaboration with patients, families and other members of the multidisciplinary health care team;
  6. Evaluate the appropriateness and efficacy of care in relation to the special needs of patients across the lifespan and the needs of patients, family and carers from Indigenous and culturally diverse backgrounds;
  7. Relate the pharmacology of drugs and toxins commonly associated with overdose or accidental exposure and antidotes used by paramedics for the management of these conditions;
  8. Reflect on the diagnostic reasoning, clinical problem solving and clinical decision making processes that influence the care of patients with toxicological and environmental conditions in order to evaluate and justify management decisions and identify threats to patient safety;
  9. Describe the special features and trends in the Australian health system relating to prevention and management of health emergencies related to toxins or environmental exposure.

Assessment

Mid semester test 1 (40 minutes): 20%
Clinical Portfolio: 30%
Written examination (2 hours): 50%
Case simulation (30 minutes): pass/fail (hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Gayle McLelland

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by developing knowledge and skills needed to care for birthing women and neonates in the community. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies.

Outcomes

  1. Describe models of care associated with maternal services available to the community.
  2. Identify and interpret the evidence supporting the paramedic care of pregnant and childbearing women and their babies.
  3. Describe the clinical manifestations of selected health conditions in pregnant and birthing women that may be encountered by paramedics.
  4. Describe the epidemiology, presentation and management of selected conditions experienced by women who are pregnant or experiencing childbirth.
  5. Demonstrate the paramedic assessment and management of

maternal and neonatal health care needs.

  1. Demonstrate appropriate paramedic care of the birthing woman in the community.
  2. Demonstrate appropriate paramedic care of the newborn in the community.
  3. Investigate the care needs of the unplanned birth of a neonate in the community.
  4. Investigate cultural considerations paramedics should observe when caring for pregnant women.

Assessment

3 x online quizzes (10% each): 30% total
Assignment (1500 - 2000 words): 35%
Written examination (2 hours): 35%
Compulsory attendance at simulation x 4: hurdle

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation and clinical laboratories.

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Emergency health, Emergency health - paramedic practice

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or
Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Full year 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Paul Jennings

Synopsis

Students will undertake a guided advanced studies program on the development of research in CBEH and in an aspect of CBEH of interest to the student. The unit aims to develop analytical abilities, communication skills, and advanced knowledge in a specific area of CBEH. Students will undertake a self-assessment to identify a topic of interest in CBEH that they will study at an advanced level. A negotiated learning contact will describe the advanced study which may include attendance at lectures, tutorials or courses in areas relevant to the discipline; preparation of an essay; critical evaluation of a published paper, case study or research data.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. identify areas of knowledge deficit in community-based emergency health practice and research and plan a study approach to address their learning needs;
  2. demonstrate a commitment to learning by identifying resources within the university and community-based emergency health services that can be accessed to address their learning needs;
  3. accurately locate and critically assess research literature, with an emphasis on community-based emergency health;
  4. demonstrate suitable oral presentation skills to an audience of peers, superiors and academic staff;
  5. demonstrate an advanced knowledge of an aspect of community-based emergency health.

Assessment

Negotiated skills development (10%)
Literature review (3500 words) (70%)
Seminar presentation (20%)

Chief examiner(s)


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Full year 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Paul Jennings

Synopsis

Together with BEH4300 Community Emergency Health Research Project, this unit aims to increase student understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of research in community-based emergency health and to develop their analytic, research and communication skills. Students will undertake guided studies in research methodology and complete a supervised research project with the aim of developing both discipline specific and generic research skills.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. discuss the different methods of knowledge acquisition and synthesis
  2. discuss the ethical, legal and cultural responsibilities of scientific investigation
  3. describe the principles of "Good clinical research" as described by the NH&MRC, with an emphasis on research in community-based emergency health
  4. describe the phases of the research process
  5. discuss basic research concepts and methodology, in both quantitative and qualitative experimental designs
  6. critically review scientific literature in community-based emergency health
  7. consult with both a statistician and a qualitative researcher to discuss the role of methodology consultants in the research process
  8. write up scientific work in a potentially publishable manner
  9. prepare and present suitable oral and written presentations for the emergency health academic, research and scientific community
  10. demonstrate the ability to pursue higher studies in community-based emergency health
  11. demonstrate competence in locating, assessing and storing research literature with an emphasis on community-based emergency health
  12. design an appropriate research methodology to address an identified research issue/question in consultation with the supervisor.

Assessment

Ethics application (40%)
Research proposal (2500 words) (40%)
Seminar presentation (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites


24 points, SCA Band 2, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedics
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Full year 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Paul Jennings

Synopsis

This unit aims to increase student understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of research in community-based emergency health and to develop their analytic, research and communication skills. Students will undertake guided studies in research methodology and complete a supervised research project with the aim of developing both discipline specific and generic research skills

Outcomes

On completion students will be able to:

  1. discuss the different methods of knowledge acquisition and synthesis
  2. discuss the ethical, legal, and cultural responsibilities of scientific investigation
  3. describe the principles of "Good Clinical Research", as described by the NH&MRC, with an emphasis on research in community-based emergency health
  4. describe the phases of the research process
  5. discuss basic research concepts and methodology, in both quantitative and qualitative experimental designs
  6. critically review the scientific literature in community-based emergency health
  7. consult with both a statistician and a qualitative researcher to discuss the role of methodology consultants in the research process
  8. write up scientific work in a potentially publishable manner
  9. prepare and present suitable oral and written presentations for the emergency health academic, research and scientific community
  10. demonstrate a range of technical skills appropriate to community-based emergency health research
  11. demonstrate the ability to pursue higher studies in community based emergency health
  12. discuss the breadth and diversity of research in health sciences
  13. plan and implement a research project and prepare the associated report.

Assessment

Research report (3500 - 5000 words) (80%)
Seminar presentation (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Honours degree of Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedics)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Gippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Wayne Sturrock (Peninsula)

Synopsis

This unit is the first in a sequence of two biomedical science units that provides foundation knowledge of human anatomy and physiology relevant to the allied health professions of ambulance and paramedic studies, nursing, midwifery and occupational therapy. In this unit you will learn about the biological basis of human health and the working of human body.
The unit introduces students to the scientific methods of thought; it encourages the critical evaluation of evidence, and promotes an awareness of the changing nature of medical knowledge. The major themes of study are the structural levels of body organisation, communication via the nervous and endocrine systems, the reproductive system and early stages of human development. Topics include the chemical and cellular basis of human life; integration of body functions and homeostasis; the structure and function of the integumentary system; the structure and function of the nervous and the effect of drugs on this system; the endocrine system; the reproductive system; and the major changes in embryonic development in early pregnancy.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. apply the concept of homeostasis to physiological processes;
  2. describe the basic structure and function of cells and tissue types ;
  3. relate the structure of the integumentary system to its function;
  4. relate the structure of the major anatomical divisions of the nervous system to the sensory, integrative, and responsive functions of nervous tissues ;
  5. explain how electrochemical signals are conducted within the nervous system
  6. compare the functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system;
  7. discuss the basic principals of pharmacology;
  8. relate the structure of the endocrine system to the integration of body functions;
  9. relate the structure of the reproductive system to the function of gametogenesis and fertilisation;
  10. describe the major changes in embryonic and fetal development, and maternal adaptations in pregnancy;
  11. observe, measure and present clinical data and discuss the validity of the data; and
  12. apply theoretical concepts to simulated clinical scenarios to develop a framework for the scientific understanding of clinical practice.

Assessment

Online tests: 10%
Assignment: 10%
Laboratory test: 30%
Examination (2 hours): 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures, 1 hour tutorial and 2 hours practical or online work per week. An additional 6 hours of private study is recommended.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course code 0727or 2552 or 3445 or 3562 or 3869 or 3892 or 3953 or 3963 or 4506 or 4514

Prohibitions

BMS1021 and BMS2011 and BMS2031 and PHY2021


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Elise Randle-Barrett (Peninsula)

Synopsis

This unit is the second in a sequence of two health science units that provides foundation knowledge of human anatomy and physiology relevant to the allied health professions of occupational therapy, ambulance and paramedic studies.
The unit develops further the critical evaluation of evidence and an awareness of the changing nature of knowledge in the health sciences. The major themes in this unit of study are; body support and movement, and cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology, the respiratory system, the urinary system and the control of body fluids; the digestive system and the processing of nutrients in the body; the lymphoid system and immunity, and microbes and infection.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. relate the structure of the major bones, joints and muscles to the functions of support and movement;
  2. relate the structure of the heart, circulatory and lymphatic systems to the functions of transport and maintenance of homeostasis;
  3. relate the structure of the respiratory system to the mechanics of ventilation and the processes of gas exchange and transport,
  4. relate the structure of the digestive system to digestive, absorptive, and metabolic functions;
  5. relate the structure of the urinary system to excretory functions and fluid balance;
  6. describe the major groups of microbes which interact with humans and explain the nature of these interactions, incorporating the protective roles of the body's innate and adaptive defences;
  7. observe, measure and present clinical data and discuss the validity of the data; and;
  8. apply theoretical concepts to simulated clinical scenarios to develop a framework for the scientific understanding of clinical practice.

Assessment

Online assessment (10%)
Assignment (15%)
Practical test (30%)
Examination (2 hours) (45%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures, 1 hour of tutorial and 2 hours practical or online work per week. An additional 6 hours per week of private study is recommended.

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course code 3445, 3869

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedBerwick Second semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Gippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Andrew Davies (Berwick), Dr Wayne Sturrock (Clayton), Mrs Janee Hoch (Gippsland), Dr Natalie Bennett (Peninsula)

Synopsis

This unit is the second in a sequence of two health science units that provides foundation knowledge of human anatomy and physiology relevant to the allied health professions of nursing and midwifery.
The unit develops further the critical evaluation of evidence and an awareness of the changing nature of knowledge in the health sciences. The major themes in this unit of study are; body support and movement, and cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology, the respiratory system, the urinary system and the control of body fluids; the digestive system and the processing of nutrients in the body; the lymphoid/immune system, and microbes and infection.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  1. relate the structure of the major bones, joints and muscles to the functions of support and movement;
  2. relate the structure of the heart, circulatory and lymphatic systems to the functions of transport and maintenance of homeostasis;
  3. relate the structure of the respiratory system to the mechanics of ventilation and the processes of gas exchange and transport;
  4. relate the structure of the digestive system to digestive, absorptive, and metabolic functions;
  5. relate the structure of the urinary system to excretory functions and fluid balance;
  6. describe the major groups of microbes which interact with humans and explain the nature of these interactions, incorporating the protective roles of the body's innate and adaptive defences;
  7. observe, measure and present clinical data and discuss the validity of the data; and
  8. develop skills in linking underlying physiological principles to the care of a client in a clinical scenario.

Assessment

Online assessment (10%)
Assignment (15%)
Practical test (30%)
Examination (2 hours) (45%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures, 1 hour of tutorial and 2 hours practical or online work per week. An additional 6 hours per week of private study is recommended.

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course code 0727 or 2552 or 3562 or 3892 or 3953 or 3963 or 4506 or 4514

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Andrew Davies

Synopsis

Processes of disease will be presented in the form of case studies, in which an analysis of the disease process will lead to an understanding of the presentation, and opportunities for management, of that disease. The major areas of study are: Disease at the cellular level, Cardiovascular disease, Respiratory disease, Cerebrovascular disease, Neoplastic disease, Renal disease, Disorders of the digestive tract, Liver disease, Endocrine disease, Genetic disease, and Bone and joint disorders.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  • describe the major causes of cell damage and responses to such damage;
  • explain how cell, organ and whole-body functions are affected by various disease processes;
  • demonstrate an understanding of pathological processes in selected genetic diseases, and explain the modes of inheritance of those diseases;
  • develop skills in the observation, presentation and critical evaluation of clinical data; and
  • relate the above accounts of disease processes to the presentation of relevant diseases, and discuss rationales for their management.

Assessment

Examination (2 hours): 60%
Online tests - 5% each (2): 10%
Laboratory/Tutorial work (5): 30%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Examination (2 hours): 60%; Online tests (3): 15%; Laboratory work (3): 25%

Prerequisites

HSC1101 and HSC1102, or BMA1901 and one of BMA1902 or BMA1912

Prohibitions

BMS2031, BMS2011, PHY2021 or PHY2032


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Andrew Davies

Synopsis

The unit involves a study of common communicable diseases with a focus on the prevention and management of infections encountered in a diversity of health care settings. Laboratory-based case studies are used to study hospital-acquired and community-acquired infections including wound infections, common infections in the oncology, transplant and maternity wards, vaccine-preventable infections in children, outbreaks of community-acquired infections, communicable infections in indigenous populations and in developing countries. Various public health control measures including disease surveillance, immunisation, antimicrobial therapies, and infection control practices are discussed.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. describe the distinguishing features of the major groups of pathogenic microorganisms;
  2. recognize that the occurrence of infectious disease is the outcome of interactions between microbial factors, host factors, physical environmental factors and social influences;
  3. explain how communicable infections are spread in health care settings and in community settings;
  4. use a basic knowledge of epidemiological methods to understand the investigation of outbreaks of communicable disease in populations;
  5. recognize the particular challenges in controlling communicable disease in remote areas of Australia and in developing countries;
  6. assess the efficacy of infection control strategies, antimicrobial therapies, and immunization in the control and management of major communicable diseases; and
  7. elaborate on the principles of infection control by using appropriate examples in acute care settings and community-based care settings.

Assessment

Written exam (2 hours): 50%
MCQ tests (2 in class):10% each - total 20%
Written case report: 30%.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

4 hours on campus, 1 hour online

Prerequisites

HSC1101 and HSC1102, or BMA1901 and one of BMA1902 or BMA1912

Prohibitions

Prohibitions BMS2052, MIC2022


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Helen Ackland

Synopsis

This unit examines how health systems are organised, how health services are delivered, and the broader context in which disease and illness occur.
It considers the Australian health care system in detail and the global context of health systems and health inequalities. It explores two areas: health policy and service delivery systems; and illness and health in the context of social, cultural and behavioural systems.
Areas covered include: health systems, health policy, health funding, quality in health systems, models of health, population health, health and human rights.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit students will:

  1. understand key principles in the organisation and funding of health systems
  2. be able to apply an understanding of health and health services in the context of the Australian health care system
  3. recognise the key elements that determine health policy
  4. recognise key determinants and models of health
  5. understand the complexities of improving population health and how this is evaluated
  6. recognise the basis of human rights in health care
  7. develop important professional skills, including oral and written communication skills, critical analysis skills, and interpersonal skills.

Assessment

Group class presentation (20 minutes): 25%
Tutorial participation: 15%
Essay: 30%
Written exam: 30%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours of contact time (2 hour lecture, 2 hours interactive classes and 2 hours tutorial preparation time)

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Megan Wallace and Dr Tim Moss

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is on a first-in, first enrolled basis.

Synopsis

Provides an overview of physiological processes involved in fetal and neonatal development, and the role of the placenta in pregnancy and parturition. The unit will consider the structure, development and maturation of the major organ systems in the fetus, and the means by which the fetus is able to adapt to alterations in its environment. The unit reviews the physiology of parturition (birth), the physiological changes in the fetus during the transition at birth, and the consequences of prematurity and postmaturity. The major physiological changes occurring in the mother during pregnancy are also dealt with.

Outcomes

  1. describe the processes involved in fetal growth and development.
  2. describe the structure and endocrine role of the placenta in pregnancy and parturition
  3. describe the structure, development and function of the major body systems in the fetus
  4. explain the means by which the fetus is able to adapt to alterations in its environment.
  5. describe the causes of fetal stress and the response of the fetus to stress.
  6. describe the physiological changes that occur in the fetus during its transition to life after birth.
  7. describe the physiology of parturition and the consequences of prematurity and postmaturity.
  8. describe the fetal origins of adult diseases.
  9. explain the current role of stem cell biology and therapies in the perinatal period

Assessment

Semester-long Experimental Research Project 20%
Weekly Research Activity Reports 30%
End of semester theory exam 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

5 hours per week.
2 hours of lectures and 3 hours each week attending actual medical research experiments that address current clinical problems in fetal and neonatal healthcare.

Prerequisites

Any two of DEV2011, DEV2022, BMS2011, BMS2031, PHY2011, PHY2021, PHY2032, PHY2042 or permission

Prohibitions

PHY3082


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)A/Prof Janet Macaulay

Synopsis

This unit introduces the student to the chemistry of organic molecules and the biochemistry of cells. We examine the role of functional groups in biological molecules of biomedical importance and common reactions in metabolism. We reinforce concepts of ionisation and pH. We discuss the chemistry of proteins and their physical properties in solution leading up to an examination of enzyme catalysis and kinetics. This lays the foundation for an examination of the biological oxidation of fats and carbohydrates that provides the cell with energy. We examine the way energy is stored in times of plenty and relate our understanding to normal and disease states that occur.

Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit students will:

  1. identify the chemical and biochemical aspects of functional groups in biological molecules.
  2. explain the common reactions found in metabolic systems such as oxidation-reduction, bond formation, bond breaking events and a knowledge of the role of water.
  3. explain the role of equilibrium and kinetic processes in biology and the describe concepts of enzyme catalysis.
  4. describe biological oxidation and the metabolic release of energy.
  5. describe the chemistry of important biological polymers and lipids and the reactions they undergo in the cell.
  6. describe the biochemistry of molecules and reactions of biomedical importance
  7. draw relationships between these reactions and normal and disease states that occur.

Assessment

End of semester exam: 60%;
Assessment during semester which can include small group session marks, self-directed learning exercises and on-line quizzes: 25% (on-line quizzes are less than 10%);
Mid-semester test: 15%

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures and a 3-hour small group session or computer based or self-directed learning per week

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Chantal Hoppe

Synopsis

The chemical constituents of living cells and biological reactions. Cell structure and function. Animal diversity and evolution. Functional systems. The relevance of the microbial world in biomedical science. Tools for studying cells including histology, different types of microscopy, tissue culture and specialised cell staining techniques.

Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, students will:

  1. describe the structure and function of cells and their diversification into multicellular functional systems and organisms;
  2. describe the tools and techniques used to study the structure and function of single cells, tissues and organisms;
  3. explain the principles behind the practical use of the microscope as a key tool in biomedical sciences.

On completion of this unit, students will have skills enabling them to:

  1. conduct simple laboratory experiments involving safe laboratory practice, data collection and analysis;
  2. prepare and submit a laboratory report;
  3. complete quality essays based on literature research, critical reading and synthesis of ideas;
  4. operate basic biomedical equipment such as a microscope, balances, pH meters; and
  5. effectively use computers to access internet information and to communicate globally.

Assessment

Essay (1000 words) (15%)
Prac class reports (25%)
Mid-semester Summative Test (1 hour) (10%)
Final exam (3 hours) (50%)

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures and a 3-hour practical or equivalent per week

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Professor Kristian Helmerson and Professor Helena Parkington.

Synopsis

The behaviour of human and biomedical systems are understood in terms of underlying physical principles. Forces involved in human movement and body systems including muscles and joints. Energy and heat flow and metabolism, pressure, osmosis, diffusion and respiration, fluid flow in the cardiovascular system. Electrical charges, current, potential and capacitance in simple circuits, EEG, ECG, cells and nerve conduction. Sound and ultrasound, human hearing, refraction and lenses, the human eye, optical and electron microscopes. X-rays and radiation, biological effects and damage, radiation therapy and medical imaging.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit students will understand and be able to apply concepts of physics and introductory physiology as they relate to biomedical sciences in the following areas

  1. The laws of motion and the concepts of work, energy and power as they relate to human movement and biomechanics

  1. Heat transfer and thermal properties, the behaviour of gases and fluids applied to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems

  1. Principles of electricity, potential difference, current, resistance and capacitance; the basis of Nerst potential and the biological membrane potential, nerve conduction, ECG

  1. Wave motion, the physics of sound and the properties of light and their relationship to auditory and visual phenomena, the function of the human eye and ear

  1. Radiation physics underlying the medical use of x-rays and radiation in medicine and biomedical sciences including the effect of ionising radiation on living matter.

Students will develop basic practical skills in problem solving, experimental methods and uncertainties, analysis of data and written scientific communication.

Assessment

Written examination (3 hours): 60%
Practical work: 20%
Assignments (3 items consisting of set questions and a fact sheet A4 poster): 20%

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures and 3 hours laboratory and problem solving per week

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr. Basia Diug

Synopsis

Applications of epidemiological and statistical concepts and methods to typical problems in population health and in the biomedical literature. This will include consideration of fundamental ethical issues pertaining to the conduct of biomedical research and population health interventions. Much emphasis is placed on a population view of health and disease, social determinants of health, epidemiological principles, research study design and statistical analyses of data.

Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Explain how health and disease are measured in populations (Descriptive Epidemiology)
  2. Critically analyse the strengths and weaknesses of different epidemiological study designs which are used in population health research (Analytical Epidemiology)
  3. Critically appraise the biomedical literature on population health
  4. Define the concept of the social determinants of health
  5. Discuss the impact of epidemics and outbreaks on populations
  6. Explain interventions which reduce risk exposure and/or treat diseases in populations are tested
  7. Discuss the concepts of diagnostic and screening tests, and how they are applied to populations
  8. Identify fundamental ethical considerations that underpin health research
  9. Identify the importance of statistical methods in the design, analysis and presentation of the results of research studies in health and biomedicine, and in reports of health-related matters in general
  10. Apply different types of biomedical data
  11. Explain basic statistical methods and when to apply them, and be able to perform basic statistical analyses
  12. Interpret statistical results presented in the biomedical literature and other media, and convey the interpretation in simple language.

Assessment

Written examination (3 hours): 50%
Mid semester MCQ test: 10%
Assignments: 30%
Oral Presentations: 10%

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Biostatistics 3 hours per week, Epidemiology/Ethics 3 Hours per week

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Nicholas Price (Physiology)

Synopsis

Introductory course on the human nervous system. Components and organization of the nervous system. Methods of studying the human brain. Neural communication and integration. Principles of sensory perception. How movement is initiated and controlled. Autonomic control of bodily functions. Learning and memory. High order functions such as consciousness, sleep and language. Practical classes involve observations on nervous system function and correlation classes deal with some common examples of nervous system dysfunction.

Outcomes

This unit consists of an introduction to human nervous system which ranges in scope from the operations of individual nerve cells at the molecular level to the generation of complex cognitive behaviours. The unit will provide students with an essential overview of the human nervous system and it will also serve as a foundation for more specialised studies in neurobiology or cognitive science.

On successful completion of the unit, students will:

  1. describe the fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and communication;
  2. have gained some insight into how the brain enables us to sense our environment and to move, feel, think and communicate with others;
  3. describe how the human brain and behaviour evolved;
  4. explain how behaviour can be influenced by genetic makeup, environmental and social factors and drugs; and
  5. acquire some basic skills in obtaining, interpreting and presenting scientific data.

Assessment

Theory examination: 60% (20% in semester assessment, 40% end of semester 3 hour examination)
Practical work (4 worksheets and quizzes): 40%

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Mark Prescott

Synopsis

Gene structure and function, including the genetic code and its interpretation, the assembly of genes and chromosomal organisation, and the basics of the genetic flow of information from DNA to RNA to protein. Mechanisms of gene expression and regulation, gene replication and repair, and the causes and implications of genetic mutations. Molecular genetics and recombinant DNA technology for the manipulation of genes. Genomics and its applications in medicine and principles of gene therapy.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students will:

  1. have a theoretical and practical understanding of the biological molecules which make up the blueprint of life;

  1. be able to describe the interactions of biological molecules which constitute essential processes in living cells;

  1. will have acquired the basic technical skills essential for experimental molecular biology;

  1. have a sound basis for advanced studies in molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology in later years of the course; and

  1. will have the skills required to use the Internet molecular biology resources to complement conventional written information.

Assessment

Theory examination (3 hours): 60%
Practical course: 30%
Mid semester MCQ test (1 hour): 10%

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures per week + 3 hours laboratory per week

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Colin McHenry & Prof Paul McMenamin

Synopsis

This course is an introduction to human anatomy. It includes an overview of general principles of major body systems. This will be followed by a consideration of specific areas of regional anatomy from an evolutionary perspective. Namely, what distinguishes the human body from other primates, mammals and indeed vertebrates and how have these adaptations of anatomy contributed in a functional context to us being so successful. Practical classes will involve exposure to human cadaver prosections, skeletal material, models and a range of imaging modalities including X-rays, CT scans etc.

Outcomes

After completion of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a basic anatomical literacy; i.e. describe and discuss the composition and relationships of the tissues, organs, systems, and regions that make up the human body.
  2. Relate anatomical structures (tissues, organs, systems) to basic developmental processes and contexts.
  3. Use comparative approaches to identify evolutionary and functional contexts of anatomical structures.
  4. Describe the specific evolutionary context of human anatomy.
  5. Use creative techniques (e.g. drawing, photography, body painting) to illustrate internal and external anatomy.
  6. Communicate anatomical information and concepts using a range of media (visual, oral presentation, writing).
  7. Relate sectional radiographic images to topological anatomy using digital 3D models.
  8. Work collaboratively to collect and analyse anatomical data.

Assessment

In semester assessment:
In-semester tests (30%)
Group research project and presentation (15%)
Log book (for recording learning in practical classes)(25%)

End-of semester exam (2 hours) (30%)

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Alfons Lawen (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)

Synopsis

This unit covers the biochemical principles of cellular metabolic regulation, metabolic interrelationship of tissues, biochemical events associated with the fed and fasted states, the generation of metabolic energy by oxidation of macronutrients. It discusses hormone action and the biochemical basis of diseases and gives an overview of tissue metabolism. It covers the biochemical mechanism of cell growth, differentiation and death. It gives an introduction to molecular medicine based on the specialised tissue metabolism of blood and brain cells.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:
a. discuss how energy and nutrients are supplied to mammalian cells and how metabolism is regulated and integrated.
b. discuss the mechanisms by which cells communicate to coordinate metabolism, cell growth, differentiation and cell death.
c. describe the mechanisms by which precursor cells differentiate into mature cells.
d. explain the biochemical basis of selected diseases
e. demonstrate an ability to present, analyse and interpret data from biochemical/cell biological experiments clearly and concisely in oral and written form.
f. demonstrate the ability to work in a team.

Assessment

End-of-year-exam (short answer questions only): 55%
Continuous Small Group Teaching and Learning Session performance: 30%
On-line quizzes: 15%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures per week and 3 hours practical or equivalent

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Behavioural Neuroscience

Prohibitions

BCH2022, BND2021

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Julia Choate

Synopsis

How the body maintains a constant environment for its cells and tissues through the integrated functions of the cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal and neuroendocrine systems. Adaptation to changes in the external environment and to disease states will be addressed. The unit will be presented through involvement of students in lectures, practical classes, and assignments.

Outcomes

  1. To achieve an understanding of the functions and internal controls of the major body systems

  1. To integrate the specific knowledge and insights gained in the pursuit of the first objective into a logical appreciation of whole body physiology and the maintenance of homeostasis, through consideration of central and peripheral control systems linking the functions of the individual body systems

  1. As specific knowledge is acquired, to relate it to the content of the first year prerequisite units and the contemporaneous core units BMS2011 and BMS2021

  1. To develop an appreciation of the variability inherent in biological systems through laboratory exercises

  1. To develop skills in locating appropriate resource materials using contemporary technologies, critical appraisal of those materials and application of the knowledge gained to problem solving situations

  1. To promote the abilities of students to organise and work in groups towards a common goal, through appropriate laboratory tasks and assignments

  1. To develop skills in written and oral communication through written reports and oral presentations of research findings by small groups

Assessment

Examination: 50%
Assignment: 20%
Continuous by reports and tests: 30%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures per week and 3 hours practical or equivalent

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions

BND2011, PHY2011, PHY2021 and PHY2032


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Coral Warr

Synopsis

This unit introduces the basic genetic principles underlying modern human genetics. Topics include the identification, characterisation and mapping of human genes; the value of model organisms; the significance of the Human Genome Project; how genes function and how genetic malfunction can lead to genetic disease; how an understanding of such diseases at the molecular level may assist in diagnosis, prevention and therapy; the roles of gene regulation and mutation in cancer; genetic counselling and ways of calculating risk of recurrence of a genetic disease; ethical issues relevant to human genetics. Practicals include an introduction to molecular and cytogenetic techniques.

Outcomes

This unit will provide students with an understanding of human genetics as it relates to both biomedical research and clinical practice. On completion students will;

  1. be aware of the value of model organisms in human genetic studies;

  1. know how human genes and their functions are identified;

  1. be able to perform gene mapping analyses and understand the interaction of clinical genetics practice with molecular biological techniques;

  1. understand the relationship between cancer, gene and cell regulation, mutation and development;

  1. understand the significance of the Human Genome Project and the techniques and strategies involved;

  1. appreciate the ethical issues raised be modern human genetics practice; and

  1. develop skills in the analysis and presentation of data and scientific ideas as well as skills in problem solving and self-directed learning.

Students will have the background to undertake more advanced studies in genetics at third year level.

Assessment

Examination (3 hours): 50%
Practical work (practical reports, mid-semester test, small group presentations): 40%
Individual project (10 pages): 10%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures and 3 hours practical (or equivalent) per week

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Biotechnology

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Mr Mohamed Mohideen & Dr Priscilla Johanesen

Synopsis

The following aspects of the interactions of microbes with their hosts will be presented in lectures, tutorials, discussion groups and videos: The history of infectious diseases, medically important viruses and bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms in infectious diseases, immunity to infection, and their regulation, control of infection by vaccines and drugs, and emerging diseases.

Outcomes

The aim of this unit is to introduce students to microorganisms, their importance in the environment, their importance in human health and disease, and the methods used to study them in the laboratory and in their human hosts.

On successful completion of this unit, students will have gained an understanding of:

  1. the history of infectious disease identification and research;

  1. basic mechanisms of immunity to infection;

  1. the immune response to infection;

  1. the development and use of vaccines;

  1. host and pathogen factors and how they affect the outcome of infection;

  1. mechanisms of pathogenesis; emerging diseases;

  1. the spread and control of infection; antimicrobial agents; and

  1. a detailed knowledge of selected infectious diseases.

On successful completion of this unit, students will have skills in:

  1. use of basic microbiological equipment such as the microscope etc;

2. use of microscopic staining and visualisation techniques;

3. culture and identification of common species of medically important bacteria;

4. preparation and submission of laboratory reports; and

5. use of computer networks to access information.

Assessment

Written theory examination: 50%
Practical examination: 25%
Laboratory reports and quizzes: 20%
Laboratory practical skills: 5%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures and one 3-hour laboratory class or tutorial/discussion session per week

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Jackie Wilce

Synopsis

Bioinformatics unites the major advances in biology, biochemistry and the biomedical sciences with those in computing, bioinformatics and networking. The unit covers the application of the internet to biomedical sciences; organisation and uses of scientific databases; use of computational methods in genomics and proteomics; fundamentals of molecular modelling; analysis and presentation of biomedical data; and communication of biomedical data using information technology.

Outcomes

This unit is an introduction to the principles of bioinformatics and the pivotal role that informatics plays in the biomedical sciences. On completion of the unit the students will have a basic understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of information technology and its wider application to the medical sciences. The students will develop an understanding of the principles of database searching, using search engines, sequence alignments, molecular phylogeny, molecular modelling, protein structure and analysis and medical imaging. The student will also develop their communication and presentation skills and understand the involvement of information technology in the biomedical sciences.

Assessment

Written examinations: 50%, made up of
Revision quiz 3%
Mid-semester test 12% and
Final exam 35% (HURDLE REQUIREMENT)
Projects and assignments: 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

2 Lectures per week, 1 three hour practical session per week.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Prof Rob Pike

Synopsis

This unit will provide an introduction into the molecular mechanisms that mediate human diseases and the specific biotechnologies used to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. The disease mechanisms mediated by genetic disorders resulting in abnormalities in protein folding, protein trafficking and gain or loss of protein function will be presented. State of the art developments in molecular medicine including transgenic models of human disease, gene therapy, and recent developments in transplantation will be highlighted. Specific biotechnologies to be discussed include structure-based drug design, production of recombinant proteins, vaccine technology and research commercialization.

Outcomes

  1. Describe the mechanisms by which molecular defects cause human disease, including the mechanisms by which gene abnormalities may lead to various abnormalities in protein structure and function.
  2. Give examples of the role of molecular techniques in contributing to the diagnosis of specific human diseases.
  3. Discuss the use of current and emerging molecular biotechnology techniques to determine the molecular pathology of diseases and to design targeted therapies or specific treatments.
  4. Appreciate molecular and biotechnology research methodology and understand the skills required to undertake a research project in a research laboratory.
  5. Appreciate the research process as a collaborative endeavour locally and internationally, as well as understand the roles of grants, publications and ethics in biomedical scientific research.
  6. Synthesise, integrate and summarise information from fundamental principles and techniques in biomedical sciences, then apply it to broader contexts.
  7. Work effectively and communicate constructively within small groups in the planning, development and implementation of teamwork tasks. This will involve individual and group responsibilities and adherence to project timelines.
  8. Use their acquired skills to present data and scientific ideas, both verbally and in writing, using scientific language or plain English as appropriate.

Assessment

Mid semester examination (50 minutes): 10%
Final Examination (3 hours): 54%
Small group activity modules: 36%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 lectures per week and 3 hours small group activities per week

Prerequisites

BMS2042 and one of BCH2022 or BMS2021

(Note for Biotechnology students: Students only need to pass BCH2022)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Biotechnology


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Professor Richard Kitching (Medicine MMC)

Synopsis

This unit will concentrate on the pathobiological and biomedical basis of important human disease processes. Areas examined in this unit include immune and inflammatory diseases, (eg inflammatory renal and joint disease); cancer biology (focussing on mechanisms of tumour spread and tumour immunology); cardiovascular biology, (coronary artery disease); and human reproduction. Disease pathogenesis, including lessons gained from cell/molecular biology and disease models will be the major focus. To provide context and breadth other aspects of disease will be covered with varying emphasis, including epidemiological/clinical features of disease, current treatments and future treatment prospects.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit student will be able to:

  1. place understanding of biomedical processes in the context of the current understanding of the pathogenesis and, to a lesser degree, treatment of human disease;
  2. comprehend relevant examples of human health and disease in the areas of immune/inflammatory injury, malignant disease, cardiovascular disease and human reproduction;
  3. describe how the study of pathobiological processes relates to disease;
  4. explain how experimental medical science, including cell biology, animal models of disease and human studies are important in defining the pathogenesis of disease and optimal treatment of disease;
  5. appreciate how clinical features, epidemiological context, diagnosis and treatment (including pharmacological therapies) are relevant to disease;
  6. discuss the impact that disease may have on the individual and society;
  7. ) identify current inadequacies in knowledge and future challenges in disease pathogenesis and treatment by examining the biomedical literature;
  8. develop skills in team work, communication and practical aspects of biomedical research;
  9. enhance skills in assessing, summarizing and placing biomedical research in context.

Assessment

Examination (3 hours): 54%
mid-semester test: 10%
Satisfactory attendance and participation in seminars: 2%
Group seminar: individual component: 11%
group written assignment: 11%
Research experience, including editorial writing: 12%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week plus 6 hours private study per week

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours


18 points, SCA Band 3, 0.375 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
Monash Passport categoryResearch Challenge (Investigate Program)
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Yvonne Hodgson

Synopsis

This unit provides the opportunity for high achieving students to work with an academic supervisor and complete a substantial research project in the Biomedical Sciences. The research project may be chosen from a list of projects available at the beginning of semester from any of the Departments in the School of Biomedical Sciences. The unit convenor and supervisor must approve the project topic at the time of enrolment. Students will work in a research laboratory to obtain data, will complete a written preliminary and final report and will give a series of oral presentations on their work.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students will be able to demonstrate the following skills and attributes:

  1. review scientific literature in the project area, including the ability to identify key information in this area;
  2. access databases for provision of information;
  3. present oral reports;
  4. construct written reports;
  5. manage workloads to meet deadlines;
  6. work with a significant degree of independence;
  7. plan a large project, including the ability to adjust planning as events and results dictate; conduct appropriate statistical analysis of results;
  8. perform routine laboratory measurements and manipulations;
  9. maintain efficient and meaningful communication with a project supervisor;
  10. use technical word processing packages and graphics software.

Assessment

Two oral reports (preliminary 15 minutes, 10%, and final 15 minutes, 10%) 20%;
Two written reports (preliminary 1,500 words, 10% and final 8,000 words, 50%): 60% Assessment of laboratory work 20%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

18-36 hours per week of laboratory work and private study

Prerequisites

24 credit points at level 2 in the Biomedical science area.
For Monash students, those enrolled in the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Co-requisites

BMS3042 or BMS3021 or by approval of course convenor

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton Summer semester A 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Yvonne Hodgson

Synopsis

This unit provides the opportunity for high achieving students to work with an academic supervisor and complete a research project in the Biomedical Sciences. The research project may be chosen from a list of projects available at the beginning of semester from any of the Departments in the School of Biomedical Sciences. The unit convenor and supervisor must approve the project topic at the time of enrolment. Students will work in a research laboratory to obtain data, will complete a written preliminary and final report and will give a series of oral presentations on their work.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students will be able to demonstrate the following skills and attributes:

  1. review scientific literature in the project area, including the ability to identify key information in this area;
  2. access databases for provision of information;
  3. present oral reports;
  4. construct written reports;
  5. manage workloads to meet deadlines;
  6. work with a significant degree of independence;
  7. plan a large project, including the ability to adjust planning as events and results dictate; conduct appropriate statistical analysis of results;
  8. perform routine laboratory measurements and manipulations;
  9. maintain efficient and meaningful communication with a project supervisor;
  10. use technical word processing packages and graphics software.

Assessment

Two oral reports (preliminary 15 minutes, 10%, and final 15 minutes, 10%) 20%; Two written reports (preliminary 1,500 words, 10% and final 8,000 words, 50%): 60% Assessment of laboratory work 20%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

12 - 24 hours per week of laboratory work and private study.

Prerequisites

24 credit points at level 2 in the BioMedical science area.
For Monash students, those enrolled in the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Honours degree of Bachelor of Biomedical Science
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Engineering
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Laws
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Science
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Economics
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Commerce

Co-requisites

BMS3042 or BMS3021 or by approval of course convenor

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


36 points, SCA Band 3, 0.750 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester to First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Professor Robert Widdop

Synopsis

Students undertake a supervised research project involving research of a publishable standard which forms the basis of a thesis presented at the end of the year. As part of the unit students present seminars on their research, and are trained in advanced scientific techniques. Students take part in an oral review of the thesis report. Candidates may commence the Honours year at the beginning of either the first or second semester.

Outcomes

On completion of the Honours year of the Bachelor of Biomedical Science, students will:

  1. be able to critically review the scientific literature in their discipline;

  1. understand the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of a research project;

  1. be able to execute and analyse an appropriate set of studies;

  1. be proficient in computer-based data acquisition, analysis, presentation, and word processing;

  1. be able to write up scientific work in a potentially publishable way;

  1. show communication skills in both oral and written presentation to a scientific audience;

  1. have acquired a range of technical skills appropriate to their discipline;

  1. have the capability to perform a variety of scientific procedures and techniques that are essential to the satisfactory completion and reporting of a research project;

  1. have the ability to pursue higher studies in selected disciplines of biomedical science; and

  1. have gained insight into the breadth and diversity of the biomedical sciences.

Assessment

Literature review: 10%
Seminars: 10%
Research report: 80%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

A distinction level average in 24 credit points at third year level, including at least 12 points in 3rd year BMS units

Co-requisites

BMS4200. Must be enrolled in the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Biomedical Science

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


12 points, SCA Band 3, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester to First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Professor Robert Widdop.

Synopsis

The unit aims to develop analytical abilities and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in specific areas of Biomedical Science. Students will undertake a module of statistics relevant to scientific hypothesis testing and provide a written critique of a scientific article. Students will also undertake a component of work within their selected discipline that is unrelated to their specific research component and involves some level of advanced theoretical training. Candidates may commence at the beginning of either first or second semester.

Outcomes

On completion of the Honours year of the Bachelor of Biomedical Science, students will be able to:

  1. critically review the scientific literature in their discipline;
  2. explain the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of a research project;
  3. recognise the breadth of statistical tests and their applicability to common research methodologies;
  4. apply simple statistical tests.

Assessment

Statistical test: 30%
Written critique: 30%
Discipline specific component: 40%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

A distinction level average in 24 points at third year level, including at least 12 points in 3rd year BMS units

Co-requisites

BMS4100 and must be enrolled in the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Biomedical Science

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Janeane Dart

Synopsis

In this unit, students' transition into the tertiary setting will be supported and the roles, responsibilities and expectations of students as healthcare profession students will be outlined. They will be engaged via adult learning teaching and learning principles in this unit as they begin to develop their professional identity. This unit will commence students on the pathway to becoming experts in food (knowledge and application) and culturally competent, self aware healthcare professionals.

Food and culture will provide the core content for students to apply, integrate and develop/extend personal and professional attributes and competencies, communication and interpersonal skills. Enhanced cultural awareness for students will be a key outcome of this unit and this will be contextualized as students learn about food/food ingredients, eating patterns, why we eat what we eat and the Australian food supply system. Interprofessional learning opportunities with other healthcare profession students will help strengthen the learning in this unit. Students will be introduced to reflective practice and commence a professional portfolio.

Outcomes

At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Identify issues that affect transition from school to university and demonstrate a range of effective tertiary level study skills (e.g. effective use of library and information technology; use of writing style and referencing guide)
  • Develop self awareness, express areas for development as an adult learner and describe strategies to support health enhancement and self care
  • Identify their own personal learning style and explore strategies to support their learning
  • Develop practice using the principles of effective basic communication skills
  • Describe the benefits and challenges associated with giving and receiving feedback and practice feedback models
  • Develop skills in reflective writing and reflective dialogue
  • Recognise and begin to practice the professional attitudes and behaviours required as a healthcare professional student
  • Identify the diverse roles of nutrition and dietetic practice
  • Collaborate in inter and intra-professional learning groups examining factors which determine effective teamwork and respecting diversity of opinion and approaches to tasks
  • Identify key determinants of culture (for self and others), including cultural differences (with respect to food and eating patterns, communication, family relationships, time and space) and acknowledge own cultural assumptions and influences and the differences between cultural stereotyping and cultural generalizations
  • Recognise the potential influence of culture on health behaviour, beliefs and choices
  • Experiment with a range of diverse foods in relation to flavour, texture and palatability
  • Investigate the foods, food ingredients and varied cultural eating patterns found in Australia
  • Compare the influences on food and eating for individuals, groups and populations
  • Develop a perspective on issues of social equity and justice, demonstrating an awareness of self in relation to diverse and vulnerable populations and as a healthcare professional student

Assessment

Assignments - 50%
Professional portfolio - 50% (Hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

24 hours per week including contact hours and private study

Co-requisites

BND1101 and must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics or Bachelor of Nutrition Science.


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Claire Palermo

Synopsis

This unit will introduce students to epidemiology and biostatistics as the core of population health and nutrition research and practice. This will include consideration of basic statistics, study design, quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry and ethical issues related to research and population health interventions.
Emphasis is placed on a population view of health, nutrition and disease and the social determinants of health and the application of epidemiology and statistics in assessment of disease in population and the effects of nutrition interventions.
An introduction to the concepts and approaches to working in population health and nutrition will also be explored

Outcomes

At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Interpret the demographics of the Australian population including indigenous, minority and disadvantaged groups
  2. Summarise the Australian health system and the political system and its operation at a national state and local level and outline the roles of the major bodies that provide government with scientific advice relating to food and also to health
  3. Identify and describe the main socio-cultural, economic, environmental and political determinants of health
  4. Define public health and discuss the origins and nature of public health as a discipline
  5. Compare and contrast the social versus the medical model of health and explain primary, secondary and tertiary prevention paradigms and strategies for individuals and populations
  6. Explain and compare the main study designs used in population health and nutrition research and explain the findings of key population health studies on the relationship between diet and chronic disease
  7. Perform basic methods of qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis
  8. Search the scientific literature related to common questions on nutrition and health
  9. Explain common methods used to survey the nutrient intake and the nutritional status of populations

Assessment

Assignments 60%
Exam 40% (Hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

8 hours contact per week plus 16 hours self directed study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

BND1102 and must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics or Bachelor of Nutrition Science.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Off-campus)
Clayton Second semester 2014 (Off-campus)
Coordinator(s)Ms Andrea Bryce

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is on a first-in, first enrolled basis.

Synopsis

This unit focuses on basic concepts in human nutrition. It will describe the role and function of macro and micronutrients essential for human health, their history of discovery, and relevance for the health of populations and individuals. The unit will include the clinical signs and symptoms of specific nutrient deficiency and excess, nutrient interactions and their significance, recommended dietary intakes and global epidemiology. It will cover methods used to assess food intake and data analysis by the use of food composition tables, patterns of restricted eating, diet myths and misconceptions and population specific nutritional issues.

Outcomes

At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. To distinguish the role(s) of macro and micronutrients in the human body
  2. To be able to identify foods which are rich sources of particular nutrients, and which foods are important sources of particular nutrients in specific diets
  3. To be able to recognise the clinical signs and symptoms of particular nutrient deficiencies and excesses, and explain the reason for their development
  4. To appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of different methods of assessing food intake and to critically assess the information derived from them
  5. To appreciate the effects that nutrients may have on the absorption and utilization of other nutrients, and on medications

Assessment

Online quiz assessment: 10%
End of semester examination (3 hour): 50%
Assignments: 40%

Chief examiner(s)


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Elizabeth Barber

Synopsis

This unit focuses on developing students' fundamental scientific knowledge as the basis for dietetics practice and nutrition science.
This unit takes a scientific approach to growth and development of the human body incorporating biochemistry, genetics and physiology with an emphasis on a case based learning approach to knowledge application.
Student centered teaching and learning methods will be used to support the delivery of the unit content. Students' participation as adult learners will be encouraged through the curricula with emphasis on the development of basic scientific communication skills.

Outcomes

At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate sound foundation knowledge of basic sciences to include biochemistry, genetics and physiology relevant to human nutrition and dietetics.
  2. Describe the chemical and biochemical aspects in biological molecules and the common reactions found in metabolic systems.
  3. Describe mechanisms of genetic inheritance and the mechanisms governing the flow of formation from DNA to RNA to protein.
  4. Describe mechamsims of gene expression and regulation, gene replication and repair and the causes and implications of genetic mutations.
  5. Describe the structure and function of cells and their diversification into tissues and major organ systems.
  6. Describe the general function of major organ systems and their interconnection in the human body.
  7. Explain the asects of cellular metabolism in terms of energy release and dietary input.
  8. Briefly describe the main stages of human development and compare cellular growth, change in metabolisim and nutrient requirements across the lifespan.
  9. Demonstrate basic knowledge and skill in laboratory experimentation and in the reporting and collation of experimental data.

Assessment

Assignments (40%)
Exams (60%) (Hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

11 hours contact per week plus 13 hours self directed study
3 x 2hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial and 1 x 3hr practical

Off-campus attendance requirements

NA

Co-requisites

BND1001 and must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics or Bachelor of Nutrition Science.


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Elizabeth Barber

Synopsis

The unit will introduce food and nutrition science particularly the chemistry and nutritional importance of food components in their raw and cooked state and their relevance to the nutrition of healthy individuals. It will review cooking skills and food knowledge required for purchase and preparation of healthy inexpensive meals in a kitchen. Methods for the collection and nutritional analysis of food intake data will be examined. Teaching will be based on interactive lectures with explicit learning objectives. These will be supplemented by tutorials and contextualised case-based learning to support student learning and by kitchen practical sessions for the acquisition of basic skills in food selection, preparation, storage and cooking.

Outcomes

At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the chemistry and nutritional importance of macronutrients and micronutrients in food and identify rich food sources of particular nutrients.
  2. Effectively communicate information about specific foods and/or nutrients and their importance in the health of individuals
  3. Evaluate the importance of food knowledge and cooking skills in relation to a healthy diet and discuss the importance of food cost and the role of pre-prepared ingredients
  4. Discuss the optimal organisation of a domestic kitchen, and describe the principles of safe food handling for individuals
  5. Compare and contrast common methods of food preparation, processing, storage and cooking, and discuss the chemical and nutrient changes that can occur due to these methods.
  6. Design meal plans and food budgeting for healthy individuals from a range of cultural groups
  7. Evaluate different methods for the collection of food intake data from individuals and a range of basic anthropometric indicators used for assessing individual nutritional status.
  8. Read and analyse food labels and identify the information required on a nutrition information panel in Australia.
  9. Describe common additives found in foods and investigate how their presence is recorded by food labelling.
  10. Compare and contrast Australian and International food composition data including the varying methods used to analyse nutrient content of foods and apply these data to calculate the nutrient intake of healthy individuals.

Assessment

Assessment in this unit will be both formative and summative.
Summative assessment:
50% Assignments
50% Final Exam (Hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

11 hours contact per week plus 13 hours self directed study
3 x 2hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial and 1 x 3hr practical

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

BND1002 and Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics or Bachelor of Nutrition Science


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Evelyn Volders

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is on a first-in, first enrolled basis.

Synopsis

This unit focuses on health behaviours, growth and development, physical activity and nutritional requirements for groups across the lifespan from infancy to old age. It will focus on normal nutrition, physiology, physical activity and growth and development for lifespan groups and vulnerable groups. The unit will draw on principles from psychology that will allow students to understand how health beliefs, illness and other factors impact on actions. Concepts of health education and promotion will enhance students' knowledge and ability to communicate nutrition messages effectively to groups. The unit will incorporate elements of personal and professional development such as cultural competency, social justice, translation of technical information into practical advice about food and eating, communication skills, reflection and teamwork.

This unit will focus on Theme 3 (Nutrition fundamentals in Health and Disease) and Theme 2 (Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition) and Theme 2 objectives but will also include aspects of Theme 1 (Personal development and professional practice) and Theme 4 (Food: from Science to Systems) with an integrated assessment task and Theme 4 (From Science to System.

Site visits to care settings such as child care and/or aged care will enhance the learning experience and provide an applied real life context to theory.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:

  1. Discuss and apply links between growth and development and health (including nutrition) and human behaviour across the lifespan.
  2. Develop skills in integrating knowledge into practice consistent with best available evidence in nutritional needs and health education of groups
  3. Discuss how psychological, cultural, personal, economic and social factors influence health behaviours
  4. Discuss physical activity guidelines, evidence and recommendations across the lifespan
  5. Relate the theoretical basis of health education and health promotion to practice
  6. Plan, implement and evaluate a group education session
  7. Present an innovative approach to nutrition education for groups
  8. Apply the knowledge of health education, nutrition and human behaviour to describe, develop and evaluate education resource material
  9. Extend communication skills in a safe environment considering social, physical and cultural factors
  10. Practice professional attitudes and behaviours including reflection and team work
  11. Apply social justice principles in practice
  12. Evaluate practice of self and peers

Fieldwork

Students will be expected to complete a child care and an aged care centre visit to fulfil the requirements for this unit .

Assessment

Exam (Hurdle) (40%)
Menu planning for groups (20%)
Group education assignment and presentations (25%)
Professional portfolio development (15%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

4 x 2 hours per week lectures/tutorials on campus
2 x 2 hours practical sessions/ tutorials on campus
12 hours self study and assessment related work are recommended per week in addition

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Students must be enrolled in 3404 or 3956.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
Monash Passport categoryResearch Challenge (Investigate Program)
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Claire Palermo

Synopsis

This unit will focus on developing students as researchers. It builds on knowledge and skills developed in Year 1 on the role of evidence in nutrition science, statistics, epidemiology and research methods.
It will embrace the concepts and application of systematic literature review and quantitative and qualitative data related to nutrition. Students will be supported to apply and practice these research skills in a safe classroom environment and via hypothetical models while applying real and relevant data collection and analysis tools to current, pertinent and important research questions in nutrition.
The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 3: Nutrition Fundamentals of Health and Disease.

Outcomes

At the completion of this unit students will be able to:

  • Design a simple research study relating to a nutrition issue
  • Define the process of systematic review
  • Develop and implement a systematic review protocol
  • Apply methods of qualitative and quantitative data analysis in confined settings
  • Compare and contrast different research methodologies
  • Applies principles of nutrition research project management via a hypothetical model
  • Synthesise and communicate findings from scientific literature in the field of nutrition
  • Extend communication skills and practice in the context of nutrition research
  • Extend critical appraisal and enquiry skills

Assessment

Group Literature Review (50%)
Individual Scientific Report (50%)
Assessment Task (Hurdle)

In this unit, it is a requirement that students must pass all assessment tasks in order to successfully complete this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours contact per week lectures/tutorials/teaching sessions on campus
9 hours self study and assessment related work

Prerequisites

BND1002 Evaluating the Evidence: Nutrition and Population Health
BND1102 Food and Nutrition Science

Co-requisites

3956 Bachelor of Nutrition Science or
3404 Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Maxine Bonham

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is on a first-in, first enrolled basis.

Synopsis

This unit provides a strong foundation in supporting students to become experts in the area of food - from the cellular scientific makeup and composition to food microbiology, food regulations and standards coupled with skill based acquisition, exploring the diversity of food and eating practices with an application to nutrition and dietetic practice. Theme 4 (Food from Science to Systems) is the key theme explored in this unit with integration from Theme 1 (Personal Development and Professional Practice) as students extend their skills in cultural competency and communication and the scientific underpinnings from Theme 3 (Nutrition Fundamentals of Health and Disease).
In this unit, students will acquire food preparation skills; become familiar with Australia's diverse foods and modify recipes and menus to meet specific nutritional goals. They will also compare food service settings providing food for the general population and to outline the training and skills required for food service staff. Students will gain an appreciation of micro-organisms and the important role they play in food production and in food-borne disease; becoming proficient in risk assessment and safe food handling practices. They will discuss the regulatory system set up in Australia to control food safety, food labelling and food content and gain experience in evaluating the role of science and politics within the regulatory decision-making process.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  • Identify foods macronutrient and micronutrient composition from the main food groups and cultures found in Australia and evaluate the impact of globalisation on Australia's food supply
  • Demonstrate a basic competence in cooking
  • Explain the chemistry of food during its production, processing, cooking and storage and relate this chemistry to food taste, texture, palatability and nutritional value.
  • Describe the diversity of microorganisms and discuss their relationships in the context of food,

nutrition, health and disease

  • Exhibit laboratory skills required to culture and identify micro-organisms
  • Compare food processing systems and design procedures to promote a safe food supply particularly for food service operations
  • Describe the role of the Commonwealth and State governments in Australia in formulating, implementing and enforcing modern food law, including international standards
  • Explain the format and content of the Australian Food Standards Code including the FSANZ processes required to ensure a safe Australian food supply .
  • Outline the fundamental principles of toxicology and risk assessment and their application to the setting of standards and the monitoring and surveillance of a safe food supply.
  • Critically evaluate regulations relating to food labelling, food composition and food-related claims in Australia and assess compliance across the food supply
  • Describe the process of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) in food production and supply and be able to design a HACCP plan.
  • Develop and apply written and oral communication skills with peers in a supportive environment.
  • Evaluate practice of self and peers

Assessment

Food Portfolio (30%)
Assignments (30%)
Exams (40%) (Hurdle)

HURDLE:
End of semester exam- MCQ, short answer and essay-style questions

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

24 h/week including contact hours and private study
3 x 2h lectures/week; one 2h practical class or demonstration per week; one 4h practical class per week

Prerequisites

BND1001: Personal and Professional Perspectives in Nutrition
BND1101: Science Foundations
BND1102: Food and Nutrition Science

Co-requisites

3404 Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics or 3956 Bachelor of Nutrition Science


18 points, SCA Band 2, 0.375 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Maxine Bonham and Dr Julia Choate

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is on a first-in, first enrolled basis.

Synopsis

This unit will focus on developing students' fundamental scientific knowledge in the areas of biochemistry, physiology, anatomy and immunology as the basis for nutrition and dietetics practice. The areas of pharmacology and genetics will be included as the role of nutrition in these sciences is increasingly emphasised.
The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 3: Nutrition Fundamentals of Health and Disease coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 4: Food from Science to systems.
This unit will take a scientific approach to understanding the anatomy and physiology of the human body in growth and development and the impact of dietary input on cellular and metabolic processes whilst recognising the neuroendocrine control of nutrients within the body and the role of essential micronutrients in immune function. Teaching will focus on a case based learning approach to knowledge application.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, a student will be able to:

  1. Relate the structure and function of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, urinary, skeletal and muscular systems to nutrition, health and disease
  2. Describe the organisation and function of the peripheral and central nervous systems and discuss neuroendocrine control within the body
  3. Explain the anatomy of the GI system and explain the physiological and biochemical processes associated with digestion and metabolism of food
  4. Discuss the role of innate and acquired immunity in health and disease states
  5. Examine the protective roles of some dietary components in health and chronic disease
  6. Describe the pharmacokinetics of common drugs, their distribution and metabolism in the body and their interaction with nutrients
  7. Apply the main biochemical, clinical and physical measures for assessing nutritional status and the signs and symptoms of micronutrient inadequacy and/or deficiency
  8. Discuss introductory concepts in the nutrient modulation of gene expression
  9. Interpret and critically evaluate the scientific literature
  10. Exhibit problem based learning skills and the ability to apply scientific knowledge to nutrition-related scenarios
  11. Interpret data and demonstrate skills in the reporting of laboratory experiments and scientific communication.

Assessment

Practical reports including anthropometrical (body composition) assessment: 20%
Case studies: 10%
Structured essay (3000 words): 10%
Mid semester exam: 10%
2x end of semester exams: 50% (25 % per exam)
Examinations are a hurdle requirement.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 x 2 hours per week lectures/tutorials on campus
1 x 3 hours practical on campus
21 hours self study and assessment related work

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (3404) and Bachelor of Nutrition Science (3956) only


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Claire Palermo

Synopsis

This unit will review the concepts and approaches of population health in the context of nutrition. The content will explore current public health nutrition practice issues related to priority issues such as obesity, food security and the food supply. A systems based, health promotion framework to addressing priority nutrition issues will be discussed and current public health nutrition practice will be evaluated. Students will explore the political foundations of public health policy in Australia including the impact of public health policies and will develop skills in policy analysis and public health advocacy. This unit will provide students with the foundations knowledge in preparation for the development of skills of the practice of public health nutrition.

The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 2: Determinants and influences on population health and nutrition coupled with partial integration of content from Theme 4: Food: from science to systems.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Describe the current key public health nutrition priorities and issues in Australia and the policy frameworks that support these.
  2. Appraise the political, environmental, social and economic influences on public health nutrition goals and practice.
  3. Explore opportunities for beneficial social, environmental and nutritional change to the Australian food supply.
  4. Evaluate how public health policy may influence food consumption and nutrition status.
  5. Apply a socio-ecological, systems based approach to understanding and managing population nutrition issues.
  6. Employ best practice frameworks and approaches for planning, implementation and evaluation of these issues in the development of nutrition interventions.
  7. Explain the use of and process of public health advocacy and apply the advocacy framework to a current public health nutrition issue.

Assessment

Mid-semester test 20%
Policy Analysis Assignment (group) 40%
Advocacy discussion paper (individual) 20% with class debate (ungraded)
Local food systems map (individual) 20%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Week 1 - 4 x 6 hours workshops,
Weeks 2 to 9 - 3 hours per week (interactive classes and tutorials) ^ hours self-directed study.

Prerequisites

BND1002 or equivalent


18 points, SCA Band 2, 0.375 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Claire Palermo

Synopsis

This unit is predominantly a fieldwork experience that will challenge students to integrate their academic training and to synthesise knowledge into a practical public health nutrition project based in a community setting. The unit requires students to manage a project that addresses a public health nutrition issue. Students will participate in program planning within a work environment and provide tangible benefit to their participating organisation. Students will be responsible for designing a project, collection and analysis of data and synthesis of findings into a report. Principles of information evaluation, workload management, communication, teamwork and responsibility for project management will also be developed.

The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems.

Outcomes

  1. Apply the social, environmental, economic and political determinants of nutrition status to a priority public health nutrition area.
  2. Plan, implement and evaluate systems based, population health approaches and solutions to priority nutrition issues.
  3. Apply the research process using appropriate methods of collection and analysis for both qualitative and quantitative data.
  4. Contribute to an evidence-based, population approach to improve population nutrition health in a community setting.
  5. Advocate for policy change to benefit health and nutrition outcomes for populations.
  6. Employ critical and scientific writing and communication skills to document and report findings to professional and scientific audiences.
  7. Practice professional leadership to promote the role of nutrition.
  8. Establish effective working partnerships, networks, collaborations with a range of team members and stakeholders.
  9. Adopt a questioning and critical approach in all aspects of practice and evaluate practice on an on-going basis.
  10. Achieve entry level competencies to support community and public health nutrition practice.

Fieldwork

30 hours per week for 7 weeks plus an additional 2 days site/project orientation.

Assessment

Project proposal (20%) (group)
Project report (40% which includes 10% worth of Individual Peer Assessment) (group)
Poster presentation (10%) (individual)
Objective structured oral exam (hurdle task) (30%)
Portfolio (hurdle) (ungraded)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

30 hours practicum per week for 9 weeks

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

BND1002 Evaluating the Evidence: Nutrition and Population Health

Co-requisites

BND and BNutSc students only


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Janeane Dart

Synopsis

This unit uses chronic disease as the foundation and basis for dietetic students to develop and extend their core dietetic practice skills and build on what they have learnt in BND3XXX

Students are able to apply their skills within the academic setting in a case based learning approach and via experience in the healthcare setting which includes a 9 day individual case management placement. Students will also extend their foundation skills in evaluating evidence and applied research methods applying to nutrition and dietetic practice.

The key themes explored in this unit are: Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice, Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems.

Outcomes

  1. Extend knowledge of the role of diet and relevant non dietary factors in the aetiology, prevention, and management of disease incorporating into practice
  2. Synthesise and communicate to peers key findings from the scientific literature and their relevance and application to nutrition and dietetic practice
  3. Conduct nutrition assessments and formulate dietetic practice recommendations and management strategies using an evidence based approach
  4. Practice individual case management in a simulated and healthcare setting
  5. Practice safely and professionally as part of a healthcare team working towards Entry Level Dietetic Competency (as defined by the DAA).
  6. Communicate appropriately and broadly using a range of methods extending into the healthcare environment.
  7. Extend teamwork skills in the academic and practice settings.
  8. Reflect on practice and evaluate self and peers

Fieldwork

Students are required to complete an Individual Case Management placement experience to successfully fulfil the requirements for this unit. The placement is for a total of 9 days (3 days/week for 3 weeks in Weeks 10-12) at the same placement partner network the student has been orientated to in BND3001 in Weeks 1-6 of semester.

Assessment

Assignments (35%)
Exam (3 hours) (35%)
Evidence Based Cases (1 formative, 2 summative) (30%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This unit will run over Weeks 7-12 of semester with an average of 48 hours per week allocated including contact and private study hours. The majority of time allocated will be contact hours/placement hours with remaining time for private study.

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 96 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Convenors.
A student must successfully complete BND3001 in order to commence with BND3101.

Co-requisites

BND3102
BND students only


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Janeane Dart

Synopsis

This unit uses chronic disease as the foundation and basis for dietetic students to develop their core dietetic practice assessment skills whilst learning and applying core knowledge of chronic disease related to nutrition and dietetic practice. There is an emphasis and focus on person centred care and simulation provides a key platform for learning in this unit. A formative and summative Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) sits within this unit to assess students readiness for placement. Students are introduced to the healthcare system and a range of health care settings via a one day/week placement for part of the semester. Food service competencies (Operating Systems and Menu standards) are introduced and integrated practical experiences in the healthcare environment supports learning across this domain.

The key themes explored in this unit are Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice, Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease, Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition.

Outcomes

  1. Describe the role of diet in the aetiology, prevention, and management of major lifestyle related chronic disease
  2. Apply and integrate knowledge of chronic disease into nutrition assessment and management plans using case based learning, simulation and placement experience in the healthcare environment.
  3. Develop and extend core dietetic practice skills - including interpretation of data, collection and analysis of dietary data, nutrition assessment and intervention strategies.
  4. Develop working knowledge and experience in a healthcare setting to begin practicing safely and professionally
  5. Apply food service, food science and food system knowledge to individuals and healthcare settings
  6. Communicate appropriately and broadly using a range of methods
  7. Extend teamwork skills in the academic and practice settings
  8. Reflect on their practice and extend self-awareness, insight and cultural competency.

Fieldwork

Students will undertake an embedded placement experience within a healthcare setting of one of the key placement providers for Monash University Department of Nutrition and Dietetics. This will be a total of 6 days in Weeks 1-6 of the semester, which includes 3 days specifically related to food service experience. The aim of this embedded placement is to orientate and familiarise students to the healthcare environment including medical history documentation, following patient journeys, observing healthcare teams, practice linked to chronic disease and food service operating systems.

Assessment

Summative OSCE (25%)
Written Exam (35%)
Assignments (40%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This unit will run over Weeks 1-6 of semester with an average of 48 hours per week allocated including contact and private study hours. The majority of time allocated will be contact hours with remaining time for private study.

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 96 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Convenors.

Co-requisites

BND3101 Evidence Based Case Management
BND students only


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Janeane Dart

Quota applies

This unit has a quota and selection process: please contact the Faculty.

Synopsis

This unit is focussed on extending students' food composition, food therapeutic and food systems knowledge to support dietetic practice with integration and application in the practical and placement setting. There is extension of students' research and problem solving skills in managing placement based food service challenges. Students' personal and professional competencies are further developed. This unit supports fulfilment of prescribed competencies as outlined by the Dieticians Association of Australia.

The teaching and learning strategies will encompass lectures, group teaching, tutorials, practical sessions, self-directed learning and a placement based project.

The key themes explored in this unit are Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems and Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease, coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Integrate food composition and practical food knowledge to a range of therapeutic applications to support dietetic practice
  2. Compare and contrast food service systems across healthcare settings including key regulatory and accreditation systems relevant to food service management.
  3. Develop and communicate plans to provide safe and nutritious food in food service settings
  4. Implement , evaluate and disseminate results of activities that support delivery of quality nutrition and food standards within a food service
  5. Apply research practice skills and innovative problem solving to food service management challenges
  6. Apply the principles of management in food service including organisational management, human resource management and production management
  7. Utilise reflection, professional and personal communication and teamwork skills.

Assessment

Project report (2500 words) (group) (35%)
Oral presentation (10 minutes) (group) (10%)
Food therapeutic manual (2000 words) (25%)
Training module for Food service/health care staff (oral presentation) (15 minutes) (15%)
Placement portfolio including guided reflection (1500 words) (15%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This unit will run over Weeks 1-12 of semester with an average of 12 hours per week allocated including contact and private study hours. There is no exam for this unit. This includes placement in a food service setting.

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 120 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Convenors.

Co-requisites

BND3302 Dietetic Practice 1
BND students only

Prohibitions

BND students only


18 points, SCA Band 2, 0.375 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Janeane Dart

Quota applies

This unit has a quota and selection process: please contact the Faculty.

Synopsis

This unit uses a range of clinical conditions and diseases as the foundation and basis for dietetic students to:

  • further develop their core dietetic practice skills and
  • develop skills in dietetic education and case management in the academic setting in preparation for placement.

There is an emphasis and focus on person centred care and using simulation and case based learning to provide a key platform for learning in this unit. Preparing students for individual case management clinical placement is a key focus of this unit.

Broader issues regarding healthcare systems and healthcare provision, management, ethics in healthcare and quality improvement are covered in this unit. Students' professional competencies are further developed and this unit supports fulfilment of prescribed competencies as outlined by the Dieticians Association of Australia.

The key themes explored in this unit are Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease, coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Examine the role of diet in the aetiology, prevention, and management of a range of clinical conditions and diseases in preparation for clinical case management
  2. Apply and integrate knowledge of science and disease into nutrition assessment and management of clinical cases including consideration of broader issues regarding healthcare systems and provision, management, ethics and quality improvement
  3. Progress core skills in the clinical dietetic process towards case management including prioritisation and discharge planning
  4. Integrate personal, social, clinical, cultural, physiological, ethical, environmental and economic factors into clinical reasoning and decision making in case management
  5. Apply an evidence based approach to clinical case management
  6. Identify and critically review evidence in clinical dietetics communicating practice applications
  7. Incorporate theories of behaviour change and learning theory in counselling and education skills to support effective dietetic case management
  8. Communicate appropriately and broadly using a range of methods both written and oral
  9. Reflect on practice extending self-awareness, insight and cultural competency linking to professionalism.

Assessment

Exam (hurdle) (1 hour MCQ/EMQ mid semester exam and 3 hour exam) (35%)
Case based portfolio (including guided reflection) (individual) (6000 words) (35%)
Evidence based education resource ( 2 x double sided A4 equivalents) (10%)
Poster presentation (7 minutes) (10%)
Self-developed placement resource (10%)
Professional Behaviour Appraisal Form (hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This unit will run predominantly over Weeks 1-9 of semester with an average of 24 hours per week allocated including contact and private study hours.

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 120 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Convenors.

Co-requisites

BND3202 Food for Dietetic Practice
BND students only

Prohibitions

BND students only


18 points, SCA Band 2, 0.375 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
Monash Passport categoryIndustry Linkage (Act Program)
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Simone Gibson

Synopsis

The knowledge areas of the medical treatment domains of clinical dietetics as required by the Dietitians Association of Australia will be taught and practised under supervision in the healthcare setting for acute and chronic conditions.

The practical experience of nutrition assessment, including anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, dietary, appetite and gastrointestinal function will be placed in the context of underlying medical conditions, and a nutrition care plan formulated, implemented and evaluated for outcomes.

The acute and ambulatory aspects of nutrition care will be studied, and the aspects of team management (nursing, allied health, medicine, social work) are placed in context with the development of communication skills. The student spends most time in the clinical placement setting with clinical education support and supervision. Case based learning will be used in class, co-morbidities examined for prioritisation of nutrition interventions in a problem solving context, and the student incrementally takes more responsibility over the semester for patient care including charting in the medical histories, co-signed by the supervisor.

The domains covered in this unit will be the management and dietetic treatment of gastrointestinal and pancreatic disease, liver disease, oncology, renal disease, pulmonary disease, allergy; neurosciences, nutrition support methodologies, intensive care nutrition, surgery, trauma, burns, infectious diseases and acute paediatrics.

Outcomes

The knowledge areas of the medical treatment domains of clinical dietetics as required by the Dietitians Association of Australia will be taught and practised under supervision in the healthcare setting for acute and chronic conditions.

The practical experience of nutrition assessment, including anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, dietary, appetite and gastrointestinal function will be placed in the context of underlying medical conditions, and a nutrition care plan formulated, implemented and evaluated for outcomes.

The acute and ambulatory aspects of nutrition care will be studied, and the aspects of team management (nursing, allied health, medicine, social work) are placed in context with the development of communication skills. The student spends most time in the clinical placement setting with clinical education support and supervision. Case based learning will be used in class, co-morbidities examined for prioritisation of nutrition interventions in a problem solving context, and the student incrementally takes more responsibility over the semester for patient care including charting in the medical histories, co-signed by the supervisor.

The domains covered in this unit will be the management and dietetic treatment of gastrointestinal and pancreatic disease, liver disease, oncology, renal disease, pulmonary disease, allergy; neurosciences, nutrition support methodologies, intensive care nutrition, surgery, trauma, burns, infectious diseases and acute paediatrics.

Objectives

At the completion of the unit the students will be able to:

  1. Integrate and apply medical and nutritional knowledge and principles in the dietetic management of the following conditions: gastrointestinal disease; cancer and the support of patients throughout the disease and its treatment; chronic and acute renal failure; pulmonary disease; allergy; specialised paediatric acute care; surgery; intensive care nutrition; burns; trauma and infectious disease;
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in skills required by a practicing clinical dietitian in screening, assessment, planning, counselling/education, case management, discharge planning and follow up care in the acute, ambulatory, rehabilitative and extended care areas;
  3. Synthesise information and apply to the dietetic process;
  4. Research and communicate nutritional information appropriately to patients, peers and other members of the healthcare team;
  5. Apply skills of research and evidence based practice to formulate and deliver care according to best practice guidelines within the institution and the profession;
  6. Reflect on learning to assist with critical thinking and clinical reasoning and problem solving skills; and
  7. Reflect on practice to assist with professional development and life long learning
  8. Synthesise information and apply to the dietetic process;
  9. Research and communicate nutritional information appropriately to patients, peers and other members of the healthcare team;

Assessment

Examination: 40%
Major case study: 35%
Assignments : 10%
Professional competency assessment of skills and competencies observed on clinical placement: Ungraded Pass
Clinical portfolio (including reflective and experiential learning): 15%.
Students must pass the examination, and the clinical placement competencies in order to achieve a pass in this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Completion of Year 3 of the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics or its equivalent

Co-requisites

BND4021 and must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
Monash Passport categoryIndustry Linkage (Act Program)
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Judi Porter

Synopsis

This units focuses on the role and management of food service systems, and uses the food service setting as a context for a study of general management principles. The student will gain an understanding of food service systems, and the provision of food services in institutional settings, including purchase of contracted services. The relationship between clinical dietetics and food services, and meeting client needs will be considered. Topics will include human resource management, institutional food and nutritional policy, menu design and assessment, regulatory and accreditation requirements, industrial relations, recruitment and staff management, budgeting and quality management.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Compare various systems available for provision of food services in healthcare settings
  2. recognise opportunities to improve nutrition and food standards within a food service;
  3. explain the operation of food service system from ordering to consumption;
  4. advise clients how to provide safe and nutritious foods in a food service operation.
  5. implement activities to support delivery of quality nutrition and food standards within food service;
  6. evaluate and disseminate results of food service activities;
  7. describe the key regulatory and accreditation systems relevant to food service management.

Assessment

Assignments: 75%
E-learning activities 25%
An overall pass mark in the practice placement assignment, is required to pass the unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Completion of Years 1, 2 and 3 of the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics or its equivalent


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ms Evelyn Volders

Synopsis

This unit encourages students to discuss and explore personal and professional issues in contemporary dietetic practice. It aims to draw together theoretical foundations of nutrition and dietetics and practical experiences and extend students in entry level competent practice. The unit will challenge students to think critically about their own practice and placement experiences. It will also support them to evaluate and integrate knowledge, skills and attitudes in preparation for entry into the workforce.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate their professional duty of care in accordance with the DAA code of professional conduct and organisations guidelines or protocols
  2. Accept responsibility for and manage, implement and evaluate their personal and professional development.
  3. Demonstrate consistent reflective practice in collaboration with peers and mentors.
  4. Evaluate nutrition and dietetic practice and apply valid and relevant conclusions and recommendations for practice.
  5. Use negotiation, teamwork and conflict resolution skills to promote best practice.
  6. Advocate for the role of nutrition and dietetics.
  7. Apply evidence and judgement to food and nutrition issues.

Assessment

Debate: 20%
Personal and Professional Development Plan including reflection: 30%
Assignments: 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Completion of Year 3, and semester one of Year 4 in the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics


18 points, SCA Band 2, 0.375 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
Monash Passport categoryIndustry Linkage (Act Program)
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Claire Palermo

Synopsis

This fieldwork will challenge the student to integrate their academic training and to synthesise knowledge into a practical community or public health nutrition project. The unit requires students to participate in the program planning cycle towards addressing a public health or community nutrition issue for the workplace setting. Students will gain confidence by participating in a work environment and provide tangible benefit to their participating setting. Students will gain entry level knowledge in all areas of nutrition and dietetic practice. Principles of information evaluation, workload management, communication, teamwork and responsibility for project management will be developed.

Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. utilise nutrition and health related data and scientific literature in identifying nutrition problems in the community
  2. illustrate the integration of public health and health promotion theory and epidemiology into practice in community or public health nutrition settings
  3. employ the program planning cycle and determine goals, objectives and plans for dealing with nutrition issues in the community
  4. adopt effective project management, team work and communication skills and work effectively within the placement organisation
  5. collect and evaluate the literature related to a community or public health nutrition issues and apply research and evaluation findings to practice
  6. organise, establish and document data, process and communication on a community or public health nutrition issue into written reports and oral presentations
  7. adopt a questioning and critical approach in all aspects of practice and evaluate practice on an ongoing basis.

Assessment

Project proposal: 20%
Project report: 40%
Poster presentation: 20%
Portfolio: 20%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

8 weeks full-time (5 days per week) plus 20 hours self directed study.

Prerequisites

BND3082 or equivalent

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Professor Helen Truby and Dr Kate Huggins

Synopsis

A weekly course over 12 weeks on research skills including: study design, use of relevant databases, spreadsheets, statistical analysis software, how to search and summarise the scientific literature, best practice in data presentation, qualitative and quantitative statistical analysis and skills in evidenced based review and critical analysis of scientific writing.

Outcomes

On completion of the unit, students will:

  • be able to explain different study designs and interpret data drawn from the scientific literature relating to nutrition
  • have developed skills in conducting a literature search and in undertaking an evidenced based review
  • to be able to explain major methodologies used for qualitative research
  • display competency in the use of relevant databases, spreadsheets and statistical analysis software
  • explain the issues covered in making a submission to an Ethics committee for approval of projects
  • exhibit a high level of competence in oral presentation to their peers
  • have experience in participating in scientific discussions

Assessment

Assessment from BND4111 will contribute to 15% to the final mark for BND3865 Bachelor of Nutrition Honours degree comprising:
Multiple choice quiz (10%)
Critique of a scientific paper (70%) including a hurdle oral presentation
Reflective commentaries on seminars (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Lecture/tutorials: 2 hours per week; assignments and self-directed learning: 8 hours per week

Co-requisites


18 points, SCA Band 2, 0.375 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Professor Helen Truby and Dr Kate Huggins

Synopsis

Each student will undertake a research project under the supervision of an approved member of the academic or research staff of Monash University. The choice of project and supervisor will be the responsibility of the student, in consultation with an academic advisor for the Nutrition and Dietetics unit. The research project will constitute the major portion of the students' work and will be conducted over a full year. For the purpose of unitisation, this unit will include the components of literature review and description of methods. Students will present their research proposal in a seminar format.

Outcomes

On completion of the unit, students will:

  • gain experience in undertaking an evidenced-based review of the scientific literature in their discipline;
  • discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed study design for their research project
  • describe the methodology required for their research project and summarise the logistical process involved in data collection
  • outline the main statistical methods that will be used in the research project and demonstrate competency in using the software programs required for these analyses
  • demonstrate a high level of competency in oral communication skills to a specialist scientific audience.

Assessment

Assessment from BND4121 will contribute 20% to the final mark for BND3865 Bachelor of Nutrition Honours degree comprising:
Evidenced-based literature review (100%)*
Oral research proposal
Draft methods chapter

*note that full quantitative assessment of this task will be undertaken at the end of Semester 2 in conjunction with Thesis examination.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Research project related work: 36 hours per week

Co-requisites


24 points, SCA Band 2, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Nutrition and Dietetics
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Professor Helen Truby and Dr Kate Huggins

Synopsis

Each student will undertake a research project under the supervision of an approved member of the academic or research staff of Monash University. The choice of project and supervisor will be the responsibility of the student, in consultation with an academic advisor from the Nutrition and Dietetic unit. The research project will constitute the major portion of the students' work and will be conducted over a full year. This unit will include a systematic review, results and discussion of the research project. Students will present their research results in a seminar format.

Outcomes

On completion of the unit, students will:

  1. be able to execute and analyse a research project, or set of studies;
  2. be proficient in computer based data manipulation, analysis, presentation and word processing;
  3. be able to write up scientific work in a report suitable for publication;
  4. demonstrate communication skills in both oral and written presentation to specialist scientific audience;
  5. have refined or acquired a range of technical skills appropriate for their project; and
  6. have gained insight into the research process in an area relating to the health sciences.

Assessment

Assessment from BND4122 will contribute to 65% to the final mark for BND3865 Bachelor of Nutrition Honours comprising:
Written thesis of not more than 20,000 words (100%)
Oral thesis presentation

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Research project related work: 42 hours per week

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Psychological Sciences
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Dr Joanne Fielding

Synopsis

This unit will use a case-based approach to cover the fundamental principles of physics, biochemistry and genetics. The material covered will describe the relationship between heritable metabolic/biochemical disturbances and behaviour. It will also introduce the basic concepts of human genetics including modes of inheritance and genetic mutations in the context of describing case studies of heritable/genetically-determined disorders (eg. Down's Syndrome, Friedreich's ataxia, etc.). Students will also be introduced to several generic skills that will be useful throughout their degree (eg. writing Neuropsychological case report) and perhaps also their future careers

Outcomes

  1. Have developed a good understanding of the broad research-based discipline 'behavioural neuroscience' and its many sub-disciplines or components.
  2. Have a good understanding of how our genes interact with the environment to affect the structure and function of the brain and/or our biochemical systems, and in turn, human behaviour.
  3. Be familiar with modes of inheritance, gene mutations and abnormalities.
  4. Be familiar with the details of several heritable disorders that affect certain aspects of behaviour through neuropharmacological, histological, biochemical and other neurological alterations.
  5. Have had the opportunity to develop their group-work and oral presentation skills.
  6. Have acquired new skills (eg. locating and extracting relevant and valid information from databases via the web; writing up a basic clinical case history) that will be useful throughout their undergraduate and postgraduate careers.
  7. Understand and be able to build on important concepts underlying neuroimaging procedures (including the principles of electromagnetism, simple nuclear physics, etc).
  8. To be exposed to the ethical issues surrounding the use of gene testing, as well as gene therapy as a treatment for disease.

Assessment

Discussion topic quizzes 12.5%
Behavioural Neuroscience Assignment: 15%
Clinical Neuropsychology assignment: 10%
Biophysics for Neuroscientists short-answer exercise: 7.5%
MCQ Exam: 55%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

4 contact hours + 8 additional hours per week

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Psychological Sciences
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Stephen Robinson

Synopsis

This unit reviews the gross and cellular structure of the brain and higher structures that encapsulate the nervous system. The majority of the course examines the structural and functional organisation of the cerebellum, thalamus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebral cortex, vasculature and ventricular systems. Emphasis will be placed on how these various parts of the brain mediate behaviour and the neurological consequences that result from their dysfunction.

Outcomes

At the completion of the unit, students will be able to:

  1. Identify from pictures and brain specimens structures of the cerebellum, thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebral cortex, vasculature and ventricular systems;
  2. Describe in their own words and interpret the organisational, structural and functional aspects of the cerebellum, thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebral cortex, vasculature and ventricular systems;
  3. Deduce basic functional consequences related to damage to the above specific neurological structures and deduce the functional effects of occlusion to specific blood vessels of the vascular system;
  4. Compare and contrast normal neural function to specific deficits outlined in 3;
  5. From case studies with complex and/or unique neural damage, be able to predict and/or infer what functional consequences could result;
  6. From case studies with complex and/or unique neural damage, be able to suggest assessment methods and possible treatment approaches that might be adopted.

Assessment

2 x Written theory examinations (mid-semester, end of semester: short answer and/or multiple choice questions, 2-hours): 2 x 25%
1-hour laboratory spot test: 30%
Weekly Tutorial assessment: 20%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 contact hours + 6 additional hours per week.

Prerequisites

BNS2011

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Psychological Sciences
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Dr Russell Conduit

Synopsis

This unit examines how the chemistry of the nervous system influences behaviour, building on prior knowledge of nervous system function. It addresses the nature of neuronal communication and how neurotransmitters interact with receptors to send signals to other brain cells. Emphasis will be placed on the regulation of homeostasis and behaviour by neurochemicals and hormones. The role of glial cells in controlling key metabolic pathways in the brain will also be reviewed. Lastly, this unit will examine how synaptic plasticity and biochemical changes underpin memory formation.

Outcomes

  1. Explain the methods used by the nervous system to exchange information by releasing neurotransmitters and the interaction of these neurochemicals with specific receptors;
  2. Describe how the nervous system regulates the homeostasis of the body and behaviour via neural connections and the release of neurochemicals and hormones from the brain and other organs;
  3. Recognise the role that glial cells have in controlling the biochemical balance of the nervous system and how they protect neurones from stressors and pathogens;
  4. Identify and describe how synaptic function and plasticity are altered through physiological and environmental influences, and how synaptic plasticity and biochemical changes promote memory formation;
  5. Discuss key features of experimental design and methodology that are used in the study of behavioural neuroscience;
  6. Demonstrate skills in the use of data analysis software to accurately analyse and report experimental data.
  7. Demonstrate careful observation and documentation in experimental work;
  8. Evaluate the importance of scientific findings and interpret and discuss these findings in written presentations

Assessment

Mid-semester examination (2-hours): 30%
End-semester examination (2 hours): 30%
Practical reports (3 reports of 1000 words): 30%
Blackboard Quiz on research design and ethics: 10%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours lectures

  • 2 hours practical or equivalent
  • 7 additional hours per week

Prohibitions

BNS3031, BNS3041

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Psychological Sciences
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Professor Shantha Rajaratnam

Synopsis

Following a brief examination of philosophical views of awareness and consciousness, the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie changes in awareness are examined. The modes of action, brain regions targeted and effects on cognition and behaviour of clinical, prescribed and recreational drugs are discussed. They are compared with other altered states of awareness, in particular circadian rhythms and sleep. The notion that awareness results from the integration of cellular activity in the brain and that subtle changes in this pattern of activity can dramatically alter awareness, cognition and behaviour, is emphasised.

Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, students will:

  1. understand the neurobiological modes of action of the major classes of drugs, and their different effects on awareness, cognition and behaviour;
  2. understand that awareness results from the integration of cellular activity in the brain, and that subtle changes in this pattern of activity can dramatically alter awareness, cognition and behaviour; and
  3. appreciate that addictive behaviour has a strong neurobiological basis, and the ethical and social implications of drug use and abuse.

Additional objectives involve fostering research and presentation skills that will be useful to graduates of Behavioural Neuroscience. To this end, student at the completion of the course will have:

  1. acquired experience in a variety of laboratory-based research paradigms and demonstrated a satisfactory level of competence in obtaining and interpreting scientific data and its presentation in written reports;
  2. acquired skills and experience in electronic data acquisition and the presentation of reports using modern techniques of information technology; and
  3. developed experience in self-directed group work and the instruction of others.

Assessment

Mid-semester written theory examination (short answer and/or MCQ, 2 hour): 35%
End of semester written theory examination (short answer and/or MCQ, 2 hour): 35%
Short practical report (maximum 500 words): 5%
Laboratory report (2,000 words) 25%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

5 contact hours

  • 7 additional hours per week (or 3 contact hours
  • 9 additional hours on alternate weeks)

Prohibitions

PSY3102

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Psychological Sciences
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Dr Glenn Melvin

Synopsis

This unit examines common neurological conditions that result in behavioural dysfunction, and imaging techniques that can assist their diagnosis. The first five weeks examine the applications, limitations and theoretical bases of X-ray imaging, CT, angiography, PET, MRI, FMRI, SPECT, EEG and MEG. The remainder investigates the neurobiological correlates of traumatic brain injury, brain tumours, epilepsies, cerebrovascular disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and Fragile X Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS). Emphasis will be placed on the impact of these disorders on behaviour and cognition, their diagnosis and treatment, and on aspects of patient care.

Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, students will:

  1. be familiar with the variety of neuroimaging techniques that are available, and understand the theoretical basis for these technologies and their practical limitations;

  1. understand how imaging techniques can assist the diagnosis of some neurological disorders, and be able to interpret some of the features revealed by these images;

  1. understand the neurobiological correlates of some common neurological disorders and how they are diagnosed and treated;

  1. understand the behavioural and cognitive deficits that accompany some neurological disorders;

  1. appreciate the impact of disorders and their treatment from the point of view of patients and their carers;

  1. have developed confidence in communicating effectively with clinicians, patients and their carers; and

  1. have acquired the ability of writing case reports based on clinical evaluation and interview with patients.

Assessment

Mid-semester written theory examination (short answer and/or MCQ, 2 hour): 30%
End of semester written theory examination (MCQ, 2 hours): 40%
Multi-disciplinary neuroimaging assignment: 15%
Patient Case Reports: 15%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures per week (1 x 2 hour; 1 x 1 hour), plus one 2 hour laboratory fortnightly. 6 additional hours per week of study

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


42 points, SCA Band 2, 0.875 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Psychological Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Clare Anderson

Synopsis

The aims of the Honours year in behavioural neuroscience are to increase students understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of research, develop their analytic, research and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in specific areas of the discipline including laboratory techniques and other research-related skills. The unit is also designed to prepare students for higher degree studies. The relatively high weighting of this unit reflects the intensity of taking on a major research project in this field. In this unit students may undertake one major project or two separate, though typically closely-related, research projects in an area within behavioural neuroscience. The project(s) will provide training in both discipline specific and generic research skills and form the basis of a literature review, research paper(s) and oral poster presentation.

Outcomes

On completion of BNS4100 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours Research Project students will:

  1. be able to critically review the scientific literature in their domain of behavioural neuroscience research,

  1. have acquired sound knowledge of the processes involved in research design, development and implementation through the completion of a research project,

  1. be able to execute and analyse the outcomes of a laboratory-based and/or field-based study,

  1. be proficient in the use of computer-based analysis, data-base, presentation, word processing and data-base/internet search engine software,

  1. be able to prepare a report of a research project in a potentially publishable way,

  1. show communication skills in both oral and written presentations to both audiences who are specialists in the student's field of study of research and non-specialist scientific audience,

  1. have acquired a range of technical skills appropriate to their research area,

  1. have the capability to perform a variety of scientific procedures and techniques that are essential to the satisfactory completion and reporting of a research project.

Assessment

Research proposal (1500 words): 5%
Literature review (4000 - 5000 words): 20%
Oral poster presentation: 10%
Honours Research Thesis (8000-10000 words): 65%

Hurdle: Students must pass the thesis to achieve a pass for this unit

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

42 hours/week on their research project. Six 2-3 hour seminars/workshops

Prerequisites

BNS4200 - Must be enrolled in the Honours degree of Bachelor of Behavioural Neuroscience.

Co-requisites

BNS4200

Must be enrolled in the Honours degree of Bachelor of Behavioural Neuroscience.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Psychological Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Katrina Simpson

Synopsis

The aim of the Honours year in behavioural neuroscience is to increase students' understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of research, develop their analytic, research and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in specific areas of the discipline including laboratory techniques and other research-related skills. In this unit students will complete the Research Design and Analysis coursework component. It involves attending a lecture series and associated workshops that are designed to expand the students' knowledge of univariate and multivariate statistical procedures used by neuroscientists and psychologists in research.

Outcomes

On completion of BNS4200 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours Research Design and Analysis unit, students will:

  1. understand the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of research project,

  1. be proficient in the use of advanced univariate and multivariate statistical procedures relevant to behavioural neuroscience research,

  1. be proficient in the use of the SPSS software package for statistical analysis and data-base storage and manipulation

  1. have the capability to pursue research-related postgraduate studies in behavioural neuroscience.

Assessment

Assessment 1 - Multiple choice online exam (Mid semester) (15%)
Assessment 2 - Journal (35%)
Exam (End of semester) (50%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

2 hours per week of lectures and 1 hour per week of tutorials and SPSSX training per fortnight.

Co-requisites

BNS4100

Must be enrolled in the Honours degree of Bachelor of Behavioural Neuroscience

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitGippsland Medical School
OfferedGippsland First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Assoc Professor Shane Bullock

Synopsis

This unit reflects an introduction to the four themes of the MBBS curriculum: Theme I (Personal and Professional Development), Theme II (Society, Population, Health and Illness), Theme III (Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice) and Theme IV (Clinical Skills). Students begin to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes required by a medical student. Knowledge in the basic medical and behavioural sciences is developed within inter-disciplinary units related to clinical and other problems through problem based learning clinical case studies. Clinical skills development introduces history-taking, physical examination and clinical reasoning through clinical skills tutorials and clinical placement activities. Community partnership placements are commenced.

Outcomes

Students will be expected to achieve the learning objectives in all four Themes for this Unit. Theme I Personal and Professional Development, Theme II Population, Society, Health and Illness, Theme III Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice and Theme IV Clinical Skills.

Assessment

Two assignments: 5%
5%; clinical competency/professionalism assessment 10%, written mid-semester exam: 5%, written end-of-semester exam: 10%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

18 weeks based upon 27 contact hours of predominately small group teaching and learning activities which will include some lectures, tutorials, practical sessions, fortnightly clinical placements and Community Based Program placements.

Prerequisites

Must be enrolled in course code 3952


0 points, SCA Band 3, 0.000 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitGippsland Medical School
OfferedGippsland Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Assoc Professor Shane Bullock

Synopsis

GMA2000 provides an overall result for Year A Graduate entry MBBS based upon achievement in GMA1011, GMA2022 and includes the Vertically Integrated Assessment examination undertaken at the end of Year A. Teaching and learning activities for GMA1011 and GMA2022 have been outlined in the relevant unit approvals and student results for each of these units will contribute to the result for GMA2000.

Outcomes

GMA2000 is a hurdle requirement for successful completion of the Graduate entry MBBS course. On successful completion of the unit students will have demonstrated the necessary integration of knowledge and skills developed during Year A of the medicine course.

Assessment

Weightings: GMA1010: 80%
VIA examination: 20%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Must be enrolled in course code 3952


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitGippsland Medical School
OfferedGippsland Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Assoc Professor Shane Bullock

Synopsis

This unit reflects the four themes of the MBBS curriculum: Theme I (Personal and Professional Development), Theme II (Society, Population, Health and Illness), Theme III (Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice) and Theme IV (Clinical Skills).

Outcomes

Students will be expected to achieve the learning objectives in all four Themes for this Unit. Theme I Personal and Professional Development, Theme II Population, Society, Health and Illness, Theme III Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice and Theme IV Clinical Skills.

Assessment

Three written assignments: 5%+5%
5%, written mid-semester exam: 5%, written end-of-semester exam: 10%, practical exam (OSCE): 15%, Vertically Integrated Assessment (VIA) exam: 20%
Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% at designated group teaching activities to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Workload requirement: 18 weeks based upon 27 contact hours of predominately small group teaching and learning activities which will include some lectures, tutorials, practical sessions, fortnightly clinical placements.

Prerequisites

Must be enrolled in course code 3952


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Assoc Prof Catherine Joyce (Caulfield), Mrs Jackie Witthuhn (South Africa)

Synopsis

HSC1052 provides an introduction to health care systems (local and global), including their relations to policy, politics and the interaction of the system with the health needs and outcomes of populations and individuals. The unit also utilizes relevant current events to generate discussion and debate around policy approaches to specific issues and the politics of health and social care.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Explain aspects of health and social care systems within specific communities (local and global).
  2. Analyse health systems comparatively, including their political underpinnings, and the role of politics and policy in determining the architecture of health and social care systems.
  3. Explain the role of health and social care systems in addressing equity and inequity in health and wellbeing.
  4. Relate political and social systems to the existing structure, functions and funding of health and social care systems
  5. Critique the role of health and social care systems in addressing broader socio-economic inequity, at local, national and global levels.

Assessment

1. Individual presentation (15%)
2. Group presentation (20%)
3. Written assignment (40%)
4. Weekly Quiz (25%)

Hurdle requirements: 80% attendance at tutorials unless medical or other certification provided and completion of in-class activities.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours per week (1 hour lecture, 2 hour tutorial)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
Monash Passport categoryResearch Challenge (Investigate Program)
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Assoc Prof Dragan Ilic and Dr Darshini Ayton (Caulfield), Juliana Kagura (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the skills necessary to locate, critique the usefulness and quality of, and summarise evidence to provide them with a solid foundation for an evidence-based approach to optimising health and well-being at a population level. Students are guided through skills in searching for and locating evidence. They are introduced to different research methodologies and ways of analysing data to understand various research paradigms. This information is used to critique the available literature. Students will be introduced to both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis; basic descriptive statistics;, measurement concepts; and synthesis and reporting of data.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Describe different sources of evidence in health (e.g. newspaper articles, internet sites, journal publications, etc)
  2. Retrieve and evaluate health information from diverse sources in order to inform and improve the practice of public health
  3. Describe quantitative and qualitative techniques for data collection and basic analysis for reporting data
  4. Recognise issues of cultural context and ethical principles in data collection and interpretation
  5. Summarise and interpret health information
  6. Demonstrate the ability to summarise and communicate evidence for professional audiences

Assessment

Evidence ranking and summary - written (20%)
Online Quizzes:
a: Quantitative data test (5%)
b: Qualitative data test (5%)
Group presentation - oral (30%)
Written examination - 2 hours (40%)

Hurdle requirements:
Tutorial attendance (80% attendance)
Workshop attendance (80% attendance)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

4 hours per week - 1 hour lecture, 2 hour tutorial, 1 hour workshop


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedBerwick Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Biswajit Banik

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the key principles and frameworks that guide health promotion and disease prevention in Australia and internationally. Students will examine concepts and theories that underpin health promotion and the primary care, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches used in this field. Important dimensions of practice, including partnerships, participation, multi-level action, capacity building and evidence-based practice will be explored. The areas of health promotion action that will be examined will encompass policy development for health, creating supportive environments, health education strategies, health communication techniques at the group and population level, and advocacy. The application of these to health challenges in diverse cultural and economic contexts will be explored. By the completion of the Unit, students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of health promotion's key concepts, values and methods, and the criteria by which the quality of practice can be judged.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. discuss and critically reflect on principles, concepts and frameworks that underpin health promotion;
  2. compare primary care, behavioural, and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion and discuss their strengths and limitations;
  3. describe the role of empowerment in health improvement and the scope for community participation in health promotion;
  4. identify the attributes of effective partnerships for health promotion;
  5. identify the different types of evidence that can guide health and sources of evidence that can assist in strategy selection;
  6. critically reflect on the uses of health education, community organisation, communication and social marketing strategies to achieve individual, social, and policy changes;
  7. demonstrate an understanding of the contribution of policy development to health promotion;
  8. describe the key domains of capacity building and the use of capacity building in health promotion, and;
  9. discuss ethical challenges that are presented by health promotion.

Assessment

Class test (1 hour) (20%)
Research report (2000 words) (30%)
In-tutorial participation (10%)
Examination (2 hours) (40%)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

1 hour lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week.

Prerequisites

Must have passed one of HSC1081, HSC1082 or HSC1112

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr John Oldroyd (Caulfield), Dr Rosalie Aroni (Berwick), Ms Natasha Khamisa (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit provides foundation knowledge in public health that begins with its historical underpinnings and leads to examination of the principles, practices and values of contemporary public health. Case studies will be used to illustrate the importance of intersectoral, interdisciplinary, systems thinking for the success of public health programs and policy. You will learn to critically analyse the determinants and burdens of disparate rates of illness and disease from the perspectives of health inequalities and vulnerable populations to understand public health priorities, and the core roles and functions of public health systems and programs. While the focus of this unit is on Australia, the learnings from this unit can be applied to public health issues and systems in any country.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. discuss the principles underpinning public health and examine public health values from different paradigms;
  2. describe the history and evolution of public health and discuss how they have impacted on the health of the populations;
  3. discuss a range of behavioural, social and cultural, environmental and political determinants that create health and cause ill-health and inequalities;
  4. identify a range of public health interventions and appraise their strengths and limitations;
  5. understand the critical relationship between human rights and public health and discuss critical ethical considerations for public health practice;
  6. examine the intersectoral and interdisciplinary systems that comprise good public health and implications for the workforce.

Assessment

Tutorial (in-class) quizzes (20%)
Group presentation (oral presentation) (15%)
Essay (1500 words) (25%)
Examination (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials
Hurdle requirement: You must complete all assessments tasks in order to pass this unit including formative (non-graded) assessment tasks, and summative (graded) assessment tasks.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Lecture 1 hour and Tutorial 2 hours per week

Prohibitions

HSC1031


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Basia Diug (Caulfield), Ms Claire Mitchell (South Africa)

Synopsis

The unit examines the biological determinants of the major non-communicable diseases that are common global causes of death and disability. Students will be encouraged to integrate knowledge of physiological factors, genetic factors and lifestyle choices to explain health and disease across the life span; and to appreciate that knowledge of the biological determinants of disease can be applied to the prevention and control of disease. Case studies will provide the opportunity to develop critical reasoning skills, self-learning and literacy skills necessary for understanding the biological bases of health and disease.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Discuss ways in which under-nutrition and over-nutrition contribute to the global burden of disease;
  2. Explain the basics of human genetics with reference to examples of human diseases that are caused by chromosomal, single gene or polygenic defects;
  3. Describe the structure of human cells and their functions in adaptive and non-adaptive responses to harmful environmental stimuli;
  4. Explain the biological basis of cardiovascular disease and its important risk factors that contribute to the high global prevalence of heart attack and stroke;
  5. Apply knowledge of the digestive tract, genetics, and dietary factors to explain the nature and occurrence of colorectal cancer;
  6. Explain how the function of gas exchange can be disrupted in obstructive respiratory disease and the health consequences in chronic conditions; and
  7. Explain the biological bases of selected global health problems and discuss possible approaches towards their prevention and control.

Assessment

Online quizzes (10%)
Mid-semester test (10%)
Oral case presentation (30%)
Written examination (2 hours) (50%)

Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week (1 lecture hour and 2 tutorial/workshop hours)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Basia Diug (Caulfield), Ms Claire Mitchell (South Africa)

Synopsis

The fundamental concepts introduced previously in 'Biological Bases of Health and Disease 1' will be developed further with a particular focus on health and disease across the life span and communicable disease.
The unit covers the biological and microbial determinants of diseases that are common global causes of death and disability.
Students will be encouraged to integrate knowledge of physiological factors, genetic factors and lifestyle choices to explain health and disease across the life span and to appreciate that knowledge of the biological determinants of disease can be applied to the prevention and control of disease.
Case studies will provide the opportunity for students to develop critical reasoning skills, self-learning and literacy skills necessary for understanding the biological bases of health and disease.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the biological factors that determine maternal and child health outcomes;
  2. Apply knowledge of the immune system to evaluate national and world immunisation programs;
  3. Discuss the changing demographics in world population and the increased global burden of disease caused by mental health problems;
  4. Compare the methods of transmission of communicable disease using appropriate examples of infections of global importance;
  5. Discuss the role of environmental factors in the spread on communicable disease;
  6. Discuss newly emerging and re-emerging communicable diseases and the challenges in controlling communicable disease in remote areas of Australia and in developing countries;
  7. Explain the biological bases of selected global health problems and possible approaches towards their prevention and control.

Assessment

Online quizzes (10%)
Mid-semester exam (10%)
Oral case presentation (30%)
Written examination (2 hours) (50%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week (1 lecture hour and 2 tutorial/workshop hours)

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Bradley Crammond (Caulfield), Ms Natasha Khamisa (South Africa)

Synopsis

In this unit, we ask you to think about the vast and growing inequities in health that exist across the world and the challenges for people living in developing countries. We explore their underlying causes including: globalisation, transnational trade, tourism, rapid development, social and political transitions, climate change, violence and insecurity.
Using research reports and field experience from practical projects, we examine the wider context for working in international settings as well as the issues faced by Indigenous peoples, migrants and refugees.
We explore our responsibilities as 'global citizens' and we challenge you to think about ways you could make a difference.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Understand the place of health and its social determinants in a globalising world.
  2. Compare and contrast initiatives to address global health challenges;
  3. Identify opportunities for action and design relevant approaches to global health challenges;
  4. Identify future global health challenges and their determinants;
  5. Analyse the social determinants of global health; and
  6. Critically reflect on contemporary debates regarding globalization and health.

Assessment

Formative assessment (not graded) include:
Tutorial participation: Students will participate in small group and self-directed activities across the whole semester (mid and end semester)

Summative assessments:
Group Presentation (30%)
Class test (2 hours) (30%)
Assignment (3,000 words) (40%)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours per week (1 hour lecture, 2 hour tutorial)

Prerequisites

Nil

Co-requisites

Nil

Prohibitions

Nil


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Rosalie Aroni (Caulfield), Ms Jabulani Ncayiyana (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit will explore how individual and population experiences of health are shaped by culture and society. The unit draws on key sociological and anthropological theories and concepts to reveal explanations for health in respect of larger socio-cultural realities and political processes. Students will be encouraged to foster skills in critical deconstruction of Western representations of culture to arrive at an appreciation of various 'ways of knowing', including Indigenous scholarship. There will be a focus on global health and in particular, Indigenous people, place, culture and health.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Apply key principles of sociological and anthropological thought to the lived experience of individuals and populations
  2. Demonstrate a sound understanding of the themes associated with the sociological imagination
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of colonialism and its impact on health
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the politics of health
  5. Critically examine and evaluate aspects of culture and society with which they are familiar (as well as historical representations) in order to extend their understanding of the socio-cultural structures, institutions and processes relevant to health globally

Assessment

Formative assessment:
Weekly quiz (weeks 2 to 11)

Summative assessment:
Individual journal (1200 words) (15%)
Individual analysis of media coverage of a health issue (1500 words) (30%)
Group presentation of a contentious health issue (15 minutes) (15%)
Individual essay (2000 words) (40%)

Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours contact time per week (1 hour lecture 2 hour tutorial / workshop)

Prerequisites

Must have passed one of HSC1081, HSC1082 or HSC1112

Prohibitions

ATS2717


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedBerwick Second semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Ben Smith (Caulfield), Nerida Joss (Berwick), Mrs Jackie Witthuhn (South Africa)

Synopsis

In this Unit students will develop knowledge and skills for public health and health promotion program design and implementation. These are core competencies for health promotion practice. Students will develop skills in community needs assessment, determining priorities and defining target populations, and selecting an appropriate mix of strategies based on evidence and theory. Strategies that take into account social and health inequalities will be examined. Students will consider key steps in implementation management and methods for building program sustainability. The planning and evaluation cycle will be examined to assist students to develop a comprehensive evaluation plan. Case studies, group work, planning tools and evaluations of health promotion programs will be used to develop practical problem-solving skills.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. describe the steps in planning a preventive health program;
  2. identify data sources for needs assessment and community profiles;
  3. develop a needs assessment incorporating elements of community profiling as the basis of an evidence-based program plan;
  4. use published literature and formative research to identify determinants of population health needs that can be changed by health promotion action;
  5. write SMART project goals and objectives that are clearly linked to health determinants;
  6. apply a range of theories and evidence to select strategies that will meet project objectives;
  7. identify administrative and management issues that need to be addressed for successful program implementation;
  8. select approaches that maximise the potential for program sustainability, and.
  9. describe the links between project planning and evaluation and the key steps in evaluation planning.

Assessment

Seminar participation: 10%
Health profile: 30%
Intervention map: 40%
Project implementation plan: 20%
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours - 1 hour lecture, 2 hours of tutorials

Prerequisites

Must have passed HSC1081 or HSC1082 and must have passed HSC1072 or HSC2101


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Nerida Joss

Synopsis

Students will critically analyse the structure, politics and role of the mass media (public relations, news, advertising, advocacy, popular culture) in constructing public health issues. Throughout the unit, students will critically review a range of recent communication campaigns and case studies of contemporary issues. The unit will cover health communication skills for a range of audiences and purposes, including presentation and report writing, developing health communications materials, social marketing, working with the mass media, e-health and the internet, and advocacy for policies, programs and resources. Various applications in rural and minority communities will be explored.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. discuss and critically reflect on theoretical models of communication, social change and marketing in relation to health and their application in medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion;
  2. critically analyse the role of the media in the construction of health issues;
  3. describe, compare and contrast different approaches to health communication and explain their strengths and limitations;
  4. critically review a range of local and international health communication campaigns as well as a range of health communication materials (print-based, electronic and web-based);
  5. identify key stages in designing a communication campaign and apply them to a selected health issue;
  6. demonstrate practical skills for working with the media (obtaining media coverage, writing press releases, conducting interviews, using the internet);
  7. demonstrate oral and written presentation skills for a range of professional and lay audiences including low literate audiences; and
  8. develop an understanding of the role and principles of public health advocacy in the strategic use of the media and community action to influence decision makers and public opinion.

Assessment

Press release (400 words): 20%
Written assignment (2000 words): 25%
Group project individual report (3000 words): 25%
Group presentation (oral): 30%
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

1 hour lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Darshini Ayton (Caulfield)

Synopsis

Students will gain understanding of the processes involved in community development and building partnerships to improve health, and the theories that underpin them. The unit examines the importance of participation and collective efforts in the social, economic and political life of the community and the contribution this makes to health development. Students will reflect critically on community development theory, concepts of social equity, empowerment, participation and the role of health professionals in community-based practice. Frameworks for community development and partnership building will be examined using a range of Australian and international case studies and current issues.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. define community development and explain the principles which underpin it;
  2. describe and discuss a range of theories for promoting change in communities and organizations - including their strengths and limitations;
  3. critically appraise the concepts of social equity, empowerment, participation and engagement, as well as the role of health professionals in community-based practice;
  4. demonstrate an understanding of the role and principles of advocacy in achieving individual and community empowerment;
  5. explain key stages in developing a community response to a health-related issue;
  6. identify roles and skills for working collaboratively with community members and a range of stakeholders to create change;
  7. analyse contemporary issues and debates regarding evaluation of community development approaches

Assessment

Essay (2000-2500 words) (30%)
Case study (oral group presentation) (30%)
Written report (3000 words) (40%)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

1 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Biswajit Banik (Caulfield), Mrs Jackie Witthuhn (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the key principles and frameworks that guide health promotion and disease prevention in Australia and internationally. Students will examine concepts and theories that underpin health promotion and the primary care, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches used in this field. Important dimensions of practice, including partnerships, participation, multi-level action, capacity building and evidence-based practice will be explored. The areas of health promotion action that will be examined will encompass policy development for health, creating supportive environments, health education strategies, health communication techniques at the group and population level, and advocacy. The application of these to health challenges in diverse cultural and economic contexts will be explored. By the completion of the Unit, students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of health promotion's key concepts, values and methods, and the criteria by which the quality of practice can be judged.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. discuss and critically reflect on principles, concepts and frameworks that underpin health promotion;
  2. compare primary care, behavioural, and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion and discuss their strengths and limitations;
  3. describe the role of empowerment in health improvement and the scope for community participation in health promotion;
  4. identify the attributes of effective partnerships for health promotion;
  5. identify the different types of evidence that can guide health and sources of evidence that can assist in strategy selection;
  6. critically reflect on the uses of health education, community organisation, communication and social marketing strategies to achieve individual, social, and policy changes;
  7. demonstrate an understanding of the contribution of policy development to health promotion;
  8. describe the key domains of capacity building and the use of capacity building in health promotion;
  9. discuss ethical challenges that are presented by health promotion.

Assessment

Class test 10%
Research report 30%
In-class presentation 20%
Examination 40%.
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

1 hour lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week.

Prerequisites

Must have passed one of HSC1081, HSC1082, HSC1112 or BND1002

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Dragan Ilic

Synopsis

The unit will look at how epidemiological techniques are applied in clinical research. It will explore how clinical trials and other types of studies are conducted in clinical settings. It will cover measurement of signs and symptoms (including normal and abnormal) and other clinical measurements, conduct and design of clinical research, interpretation of clinical research findings, and practical and ethical issues in clinical research.

Outcomes

On successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:

  1. Critically appraise evidence relating to the causation, diagnosis, natural history, treatment and prognosis of disease.
  2. Develop and select appropriate measures for use in clinical research
  3. Design and conduct epidemiological research in clinical settings
  4. Describe the application of clinical research findings to clinical practice
  5. Critically appraise ethical and practical considerations in clinical research

Assessment

2 x Online Quizzes (10%)
3 x Group Presentations (Oral with Powerpoint presentation) (20%)
1 x Critical Appraisal Task (CAT)(30%)
1 x Written Examination (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle requirements:
Tutorial attendance (80% attendance)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Biswajit Banik (Caulfield), Ms Claire Mitchell (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit provides explores the options for treatment and management of established health conditions at the individual level. It provides an introduction to pharmacology and an overview of other interventions commonly employed to manage illness and improve health. A case study approach will be used which looks at treatment options for key diseases (e.g., cancer).

Outcomes

On successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the processes by which drugs act on, and are handled by, the human body.
  2. Explain the place of drugs in prevention and treatment of specific diseases.
  3. Explain the role of other therapeutic (non-drug) interventions in prevention and treatment of key diseases.
  4. Describe how drugs and other treatments are developed, evaluated and regulated.
  5. Discuss the social context of drug use and abuse
  6. Discuss the relationship between drug therapy and public health in local and global contexts.

Assessment

Tutorial participation (5%)
Class test (1 hour) (10%)
Oral presentation and written report (1000 words) (15%)
Written assignment (2000 words) (30%)
Exam (2 hours) (40%)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Danielle Horyniak (Caulfield), Assoc Prof Peter Nyasulu (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit provides an introduction to epidemiological and statistical concepts necessary for understanding patterns of health and disease in populations. It extends the overview provided in HSC1061, reviewing how health and disease are measured, and how patterns of health and disease in populations are investigated. Students are introduced to different study designs, analysing and interpreting health data and the concepts of bias and confounding. Case studies include local, national and global examples of epidemiological research.

Outcomes

On successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:

  1. Critically analyse the strengths and weaknesses of different epidemiological study designs
  2. Critically appraise the popular and biomedical literature on population health
  3. Identify fundamental ethical considerations that underpin health research
  4. Identify the importance of statistical methods in the design, analysis and presentation of the results of research studies in health and biomedicine, and in reports of health related matters in general
  5. Explain basic statistical methods and when to apply them
  6. Interpret statistical results presented in the biomedical literature and other media, and convey the interpretation in simple language.
  7. Identify different approaches to the nature of 'evidence' in public health and the implications of such approaches for the measurement of health and well-being of

Indigenous and other population groups.

Assessment

2 x Written assignments (1500 words each) (35%)
Group presentation (oral) (15%)
2 x In-class biostatistics tests (20%)
Exam (2 hours) (30%)
Hurdle requirement: At least 80% attendance at tutorial/computer laboratory classes

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week

Prerequisites

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Rosalie Aroni (Caulfield), Assoc Prof Peter Nyasulu (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit builds on the introduction to research methods provided in HSC1061. In those units students learning was focused on appraising evidence produced by other researchers, and on describing and comparing study designs.
In this unit we extend this learning by enabling students to develop skills in designing and conducting their own research projects. The unit will cover: developing answerable research questions, matching research questions with study designs, collecting and analysing study data, managing research projects, and applications of quantitative, qualitative and combined approaches. The cultural, ethical and political contexts within which research takes place will also be discussed.

Outcomes

On successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:

  1. Develop researchable questions
  2. Develop a viable study design
  3. Demonstrate critical awareness of the options and constraints of different types of research design
  4. Select appropriate sampling strategies
  5. Identify appropriate methods for conducting research across a range of contexts
  6. Design data collection instruments (e.g. questionnaires and interview schedules)
  7. Use a suite of data collection methods appropriately
  8. Choose and use the appropriate tools for analysis of data
  9. Work collaboratively in a research team
  10. Appreciate the importance of conducting ethical and culturally sensitive research.

Assessment

Written assignments (Total of 3500 words) (55%)
Exam (2 hours) (30%)
Tutorial participation (completion of required reading(s) and/or other preparation for classes and contribution to class discussions) (15%)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week

Prerequisites

HSC1061 or HSC1082


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Liz Bishop (Caulfield), Dr Latifat Ibisomi (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit deals with two primary aspects of professional practice in the health and social care system, namely the legal and ethical principles that govern the operation of the system and the behaviour of individuals within it. The unit commences with an introduction to the legal framework, covering common law, statute law and the legal responsibilities of health and social care professionals. Students are then introduced to the ethical framework, through an examination of ethical theory, professional ethics, confidentiality, informed consent and relationships with patients. The complex interrelationship between legal and ethical aspects of healthcare practice is explored.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. demonstrate knowledge of the legal framework pertinent to healthcare practice
  2. explain why the study of health law is an essential aspect of professional practice
  3. discuss issues related to justice in the healthcare system
  4. develop an understanding of the nature of professional ethics and different ethical perspectives as related to healthcare
  5. understand the importance of confidentiality and informed consent.

Assessment

Written assignments (2 x 2500 words): 100%

Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedBerwick Second semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Michaela Riddell (Berwick, Caulfield), Ms Natasha Khamisa (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit will build on students' previous learning about global health, through examination of the 'health for all' agenda and associated approaches to meeting the challenges of health inequities.
The intent of this unit is not only to further students' awareness of global health issues, but also to encourage critical thinking about the efficacy of global health programs and the ethics of delivering aid. Central to the unit will be the question of why there is often a failure to provide a total community approach to health issues.

The unit comprises four modules of study.
During the first, students will look at global health from a broad perspective, examining the global health architecture and the roles played by major actors. They will critically appraise social and economic approaches to global health problems and examine the positive and negative outcomes for health.

The second module will cover major principles of effective and successful project management and will highlight past failures to demonstrate the complexity of health improvement in low- and middle-income countries.

The role of Australia bilateral donors (AusAID, USAID etc) in giving development aid and addressing health issues in developing nations will be explored in the third module, with students being required to engage in examining and commenting upon the ethical aspects of donor activity. T
his module also includes a session with individuals from the global health workforce, demonstrating the various careers available to students with a health sciences background.

The final module will draw together the key themes of the unit and look at how these can be applied to continuing and future global health challenges.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Critically analyse the relationships between various actors and agencies in global health.
  2. Explain, using evidence from secondary sources, the positive and negative aspects of different approaches to global health programs in terms of equity and inequity.
  3. Apply principles of health-for-all and its expression in project design to address global health challenges.
  4. Analyse programs for health issues at national and international levels for their capacity to address health inequities.
  5. Critically analyse Australia's position and activity within global health architecture
  6. Critique models of ethical and culturally appropriate development and aid delivery.
  7. Explain the current and future threats to global health with reference to various social, economic, environmental and political causes.

Assessment

Essay (2000 words) (30%)
Project plan (1000 words) (20%)
Project proposal (3000 words) (50%)
Hurdle requirement - Formative assessment task Twitter report (800 words)
Hurdle requirement for on campus offering: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Charles Livingstone (Caulfield), Dr Rosalie Aroni (Berwick), Ms Natasha Khamisa (South Africa)

Synopsis

The unit explores global and local health challenges that are at the forefront of Australia's health sector. Students will critically examine the construction of contemporary health challenges including: the implications of global inequalities in health and health problems arising from war and terrorism and political violence such as the refugee crisis.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. discuss in depth some key contemporary health challenges, such as HIV/AIDS, demonstrating awareness of multiple perspectives, including the ways in which different health professions approach the issues (and the strengths and weaknesses of these varied approaches) and exploring how integrated approaches to addressing the issues may be mounted across disciplines;
  2. demonstrate an in-depth understanding of global determinants of health;
  3. consider the common and specific factors involved in the construction of various contemporary health challenges as being of 'high priority' with an understanding of the role that evidence and other factors, including the media, play in this process;
  4. demonstrate the complex interplay of political, economic, legal and socio-cultural frameworks in shaping contemporary health challenges and how they are responded to;
  5. identify and discuss the implications of ideology, values and power bases in determining our understanding (and prioritising) of contemporary public health challenges;
  6. explore specific case studies of contemporary health challenges (global or local) and critically reflect on current strategies and approaches to responding to them.

Assessment

Written outline of research topic (500 words) (15%)
Literature review (1500 words) (25%)
Research essay (3000 words) (50%)
Class presentation (in class oral presentation) (10%)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

A one hour lecture plus a two hour tutorial per week.

Prerequisites

Must have passed one of BMS1042, HSC1031, HSC1041, HSC1081, HSC1082, HSC2022 or HSC2042


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Michaela Riddell (Caulfield, Clayton), Assoc Prof Peter Nyasulu (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit focuses on prevention and control of communicable diseases. Topics include principles of infection, outbreaks, public health control measures, and current issues in disease prevention and control.
Public health control measures discussed may include surveillance, modelling, immunisation, antimicrobial therapies, infection control, vector control, screening and risk factor management.
These topics are illustrated using relevant examples of communicable diseases such as vaccine-preventable diseases (e.g. influenza); vector-borne diseases (e.g., malaria), food-borne diseases (e.g., salmonella) and sexually transmitted infections (e.g., HIV). Epidemiological, social, and political perspectives are considered.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Identify the distinguishing epidemiological features of infectious diseases
  2. Explain how communicable infections are spread
  3. Interpret epidemiological data on disease surveillance and disease outbreaks
  4. Apply principles of communicable disease prevention to a range of scenarios, and identify which public health prevention and control strategies are appropriate for different diseases
  5. Design and evaluate disease surveillance and control programs
  6. Describe the role of social and political factors in disease prevention and control
  7. Explore similarities and differences in prevention and control strategies for non communicable diseases and communicable diseases

Assessment

2 x Written assignments (Total of 2000 words) (30%)
Group presentation (oral) (15%)
Tutorial exercises (10%)
Final exam (2 hours) (45%)
Hurdle requirement: At least 80% attendance at tutorial classes

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week plus 9 hours per week private study

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Darshini Ayton (Berwick & Caulfield)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to settings and characteristics of health promotion delivered in various settings including hospitals, schools, workplaces and sporting organisations. Students will be introduced to settings frameworks, theories and approaches and the role of health professionals in diverse settings will be examined. Additionally approaches to building health promotion capacity among staff in these settings will also be explored. Students will gain a sound understanding of the evidence base for health promotion work in different settings and will critically examine the challenges for health promotion in these settings.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Define settings approaches and distinguish key features of the settings approach to health promotion;
  2. Identify sources of data to inform evidence-based approaches to health promotion in different settings;
  3. Describe different approaches to health promotion in settings including organisational change and policy development;
  4. Demonstrate skills in planning and implementation for health promotion in different settings;
  5. Identify systems level changes in settings that will support the use of health promotion strategies;
  6. Describe capacity building approaches to improve the quality and sustainability of health promotion in these settings.

Assessment

Evidence review (2000 words) (35%)
Settings audit and program plan (2500 words) (40%)
Case study group presentation (Oral with Powerpoint or Prezi presentation) (25%)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours per week

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ruth Klein (Berwick, Caulfield), Mrs Jackie Witthuhn (South Africa)

Synopsis

This unit will equip students with skills to undertake the evaluation of health promotion programs and policies using a range of methodologies. Levels of health program evaluation, including formative, process, impact, and outcome evaluation, will be examined. The range of qualitative and quantitative methods that are appropriate for different evaluation questions will be presented. An emphasis will be placed on the evaluation challenges posed by the complexities of health promotion and the contexts in which it is carried out, with case studies used to illustrate these issues. Evaluation design and data collection options to strengthen knowledge of program impact will be explored.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. distinguish between levels of evaluation in health promotion and recognise how these are linked to program plans;
  2. select quantitative designs that are appropriate for different evaluation questions;
  3. identify the range of qualitative study designs that can be employed and the strengths and weaknesses of these for different strategies and contexts;
  4. identify methods to measure indicators at all levels of evaluation;
  5. develop survey questions and interview guides that demonstrate an understanding of measurement quality;
  6. recognise different aspects of measurement reliability and validity and how these can be evaluated;
  7. develop a comprehensive evaluation plan

Assessment

Evaluation design exercise (template provided): 10%
Project evaluation plan (template provided): 40%
Presentation of data collection tools (20 min oral presentation
30 min class activities): 20%
Data collection instrument (2000 words): 30%
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours per week

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1061, HSC1082 or BND1002)
and
one of (HSC1072, HSC2051, HSC2101 or BND2001)


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedBerwick Second semester 2014 (Day)
Caulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Charles Livingstone (Berwick & Caulfield), Dr Samson Muyanga (South Africa)

Synopsis

In this unit, students will examine the political foundations of health promotion and public health policies in Australia, different types of health policy, policy development processes and theories that underpin them. Interest groups and the challenges they pose to decision-making processes will be discussed. The social and political impacts of health policy will be explored, as well as the jurisdictional responsibilities held by different levels of government for health policies. Concepts of power, authority and influence will be discussed. Students will learn critical skills for policy analysis in the context of case studies of effective advocacy that have influenced policy change in Australia.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. identify health policy as a dynamic process which impacts on societies and individuals
  2. identify the structures, systems and institutions that contribute to the Australian health policy environment with emphasis on health promotion and public health policy
  3. critically engage with a range of public policy issues and policy processes
  4. discuss types of health policy within the context of jurisdictions which hold responsibility for them
  5. explain the role of government and their agencies, NGOs and the community in the development and implementation of health policy
  6. distinguish types of power and how they are used by interest groups and individuals in policy development
  7. use policy analysis skills to critique existing policy using a case study approach.

Assessment

Essay (2500 words): 50%
Case study (2000 words) and presentation (oral): 50%
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 hours per week (1 hour lecture and 2 hours tutorial)

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
South Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Darshini Ayton (Caulfield), Ms Juliana Kagura (South Africa)

Notes

The first compulsory seminar will be held during Orientation week of semester 2.

Synopsis

This unit will assist students to put into practice the theory that underpins the profession of health promotion by working in an agency which has promoting health as part of its core business. It will provide practical experience in preparation for embarking or enhancing a career in health promotion as well as opportunities to learn about career development, resume development and reflection on skills and capacities required by a graduate.
Applying the knowledge gained through their course by working in agencies that undertake population-based health promotion issues will help students to better understand health determinants and behaviour in the community, and prepare them for the realities of the workplace.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, it is expected that the students will be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge and skills gained in health promotion units, in the practice of community-based health promotion;
  2. Demonstrate skills and knowledge in learning about career development;
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of health promotion theories in program design and / or delivery;
  4. Reflect on the professional attitudes and skills required of health professionals working in community settings;
  5. Critically assess a workplace environment;
  6. Critically reflect on personal strengths and weaknesses as a health professional, and skills and capacities necessary for graduate employment.

Fieldwork

Each student will undertake a health promotion placement at a relevant organisation. The placement is 100 hours in duration and students need to be able to committ at least one day a week to complete their placement by mid-November.

Assessment

Half-way practicum reflection report (750 words) (20%)
Final Reflection report (2000-2500 words) (40%)
Career portfolio including career goals, cover letter, resume and placement work plan (40%)
Hurdle tasks:
100 hours field placement
12 hours of seminars
Participation in Moodle group discussions between weeks 5-12

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

144 hours including 100 hours of field placement, 12 hours of seminars, contact time of 1 hour online discussion group between weeks 5-12, and 2 hours of private study per week.

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

HSC3082 is available to students enrolled in Bachelor of Health Science 3882; or Bachelor of Health Science/Business 4503; or Bachelor of Health Promotion 4505; or Bachelor of Public Health 4502.

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Ewan MacFarlane (Caulfield, Clayton)

Synopsis

This unit explores the role of environmental factors in human health, how environmental health hazards are identified and how the risks can be assessed and managed. This unit will cover chemical, biological and physical hazards and their potential health effects in a range of environmental contexts.
This unit will encourage students to critically evaluate environmental health information and its application in realistic situations. In this unit students will explore practical examples of environmental health hazards to identify the human health risks present, ways to assess exposure and options and strategies for assessment and management of the health risks identified.

Outcomes

On successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:

  • Describe the essential principles of hazard identification, risk assessment, risk management and risk communication.
  • Demonstrate fluency with the basic concepts and terms used to describe chemical, physical and biological hazards.
  • Describe basic principles of identifying common hazards and nominate ways to assess the risks presented.
  • Nominate common interventions used to control environmental risks and the key personal, social and economic factors which may reduce the effectiveness or prevent control measures being successful.
  • Critically evaluate environmental health research evidence and to explain the limitations, relevance and application of the evidence to specific situations.

Assessment

1 x in-class quiz (1 hour): 15%
1 x minor written assignment (1,500 words): 25%
1 x major written assignment (2,000 words): 30%
Written examination (2 hour): 30%
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at seminars.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Carolina Weller

Synopsis

The unit provides the necessary skills for students to perform a quantitative design, data management and statistical analysis of a research project. This unit is a more specific development of quantitative health and medical research methodology that builds on the introductory material in 2nd year of the course.

It will involve designing a research protocol, including defining the research question, performing a literature review, selection of type of study, defining a study population and sampling strategies, questionnaire design, ethics approval, and oral and written presentation of a protocol. It will also include sessions on managing data and choosing a statistical analysis approach. Students will choose a health research question of interest to them and design a research protocol for studying that particular question.

Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Develop an answerable research question that is appropriate for the gap in research
  2. Perform a literature review around the topic and research question
  3. Choose the appropriate study design & identify their strengths & limitations
  4. Design a research project/protocol including project timeline
  5. Define a study population and sampling strategies to answer the research question posed
  6. Develop a specific approach to data collection and data collection method
  7. Develop an approach to data analysis that is suitable to their research
  8. Further cultivate skills in conducting ethical and culturally sensitive research
  9. Present a written research protocol

Assessment

2 x Written assignments (Total 3000 words) (30%)
Group presentation (oral) (15%)
In-class group work (15%)
Final report (3500 words) (40%)
Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Biswajit Banik

Notes

Students are required to attend induction sessions in the week prior to the start of semester.

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is based on academic performance.

Synopsis

This unit provides an opportunity for high achieving students to experience public health research in practice. Application forms for this unit can be obtained from med-sphpm-ugenq@monash.edu. A strict quota applies and entry is based on academic performance. Students will be placed with a current public health/epidemiological research project and will undertake specific tasks within the project as well as being exposed to the broader research environment. The specific tasks undertaken will vary, but may include, for example, dealing with recruitment of study participants, data collection and management and analysis of findings. Students will apply research skills acquired in years 1-2 of their degree, in areas such as dealing with bias and confounding, developing data collection tools, managing and analyzing data, and ethical practices in the research environment. Students will prepare oral and written presentations relating to: their specific task/s; the research project with which they are working; and the research process more generally. This unit is particularly designed for students who are considering a research career, via an Honours degree and postgraduate study.

Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge and skills of research design, methodology and data analysis in the practice of public health/epidemiological research
  2. Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the practical and methodological issues in conducting public health/epidemiological research
  3. Critically reflect on the skills required for good research practice, including professional, ethical and practical issues
  4. Present oral and written reports of research processes and research outcomes.

Assessment

First oral presentation (10 mins): 15%
Written assignment (1500 words): 20%
Final oral presentation (20 mins): 15%
Final written report (3000 words): 35%
Supervisor's assessment, including attendance: 15%

Hurdle requirement:
Progress report checklist signed by both the student and supervisor.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

12 hours per week of on-site research work and private study.
Students are also required to attend induction sessions in the week prior to the start of semester.

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Students must be enrolled in one of the following degrees: Bachelor of Health Science 3882 or Bachelor of Health Science and Bachelor of Business 4503

Prohibitions


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedAlfred Hospital First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Charles Livingstone

Synopsis

This unit aims to develop students' understanding and skills in the quantitative and qualitative research methods that underpin contemporary global public health and health science research, as well as the analysis, interpretation and reporting of data from such research. This unit introduces students to the theoretical methodological and ethical issues that underpin contemporary global public health and health science research. It provides direction and guidance to honours students in identifying a meaningful research question and develops the skills and knowledge students need to develop a research proposal. It re-introduces students to quantitative and qualitative research frameworks and data analysis techniques they need both to undertake their study and write a research report.

Outcomes

On completion of the unit students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a good understanding of the research process and skills needed to produce a research report to meet the standard required at honours level by developing an outline and plan of a research process suitable for their research project;
  2. Critique their outline and plan for a research project for their research project;
  3. Explain the formulation of research questions and formulate a research question relevant to their research project;
  4. Demonstrate a good understanding of the range of quantitative and qualitative research frameworks utilised in public health and health science research by:
    • Identifying the research frameworks used in a range of research projects;
    • Selecting the most suitable research framework/methodology for given examples of research projects; and,
    • Justifying the research framework/methodology chosen for their research project;
  5. Link research paradigms or methods to research questions;
  6. Demonstrate a good understanding of data analysis methods associated with the various research frameworks by:
    • Identifying the most appropriate data analysis methods for different research frameworks;
    • Selecting the most suitable data analysis methods for their research project; and,
    • Justifying the data analysis methods chosen for their research project;
  7. Demonstrate a good understanding of potential further research available to them by identifying future research activities in which they could participate and are of specific interest to them.

Assessment

Hurdle requirement: Students are required to attend 80% of seminars and colloquia.

Formative assessment: Feedback during seminar participation as well as following the three summative assessments.

Summative assessment:
A. An individual presentation during the semester on students' project methodologies (20%);
B. A class test on the quantitative and qualitative research frameworks and approaches to data analysis utilised in public health and health science research topics covered during the semester. The class test will contain both multiple choice and short answer questions (20%) and,
C. A 3,000-3,500 word assignment based on students' project methodologies which will form the basis of the student's methods chapter of the thesis (60%).

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Four class contact hours per week (seminar style), attendance of a weekly colloquium (1-2 hours per week), plus regular project supervision (1-2 hours per fortnight). In addition, as per University requirements, students will be required to spend up to 20 hours per week in private study/self-directed learning (i.e. a total of 24 hours per week).

Co-requisites

Student must be enrolled in the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Health Science, Honours degree of Bachelor of Medical Science or with permission of Chief Examiner


24 points, SCA Band 2, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedAlfred Hospital Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Charles Livingstone

Synopsis

The Honours thesis is a research study, focusing on a particular contemporary global public health and health science research topic or issue, undertaken with the guidance and support of a supervisor. Students will be expected to demonstrate initiative and independence during their research study. All Honours students are required to present on their research project at a research seminar prior to submission. The Honours thesis is designed for students who are intending to undertake further higher degree studies. Graduates who have successfully completed the Health Science Research Project (both Part 1 and Part 2) will be able to use their 15,000 word study as evidence of independent research experience in an application for entry into higher research degree programs.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to develop a research topic to investigate that is feasible within a two-semester time frame by submitting a 15,000 word thesis;
  2. Identify key research questions that are suitable for an honours level project;
  3. Select and review relevant theory and literature;
  4. Design a study and choose appropriate methods to investigate research questions;
  5. Select appropriate modes of analysis;
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of and discuss the ethical issues involved in their research project;
  7. Implement, critically appraise or apply research in a particular field;
  8. Prepare a comprehensive written report that is professionally presented and contains all elements required for an academic/scientific journal publication; and,
  9. Present and lead a discussion on their project as part of the weekly colloquium series.

Assessment

Hurdle requirement: Students are required to attend 80% of colloquia, and are required to meet with their supervisor at least once a fortnight for 1-2 hours.

Formative assessment:
a. An individual presentation and feedback on students' completed projects - to occur prior to submission and,
b. Feedback during supervision throughout the semester.

Summative assessment: A 15,000 word research-based honours thesis (100%). Students' theses will be examined as per normal Faculity of Medicne, Nursing and Health Sciences' practice, that is examined by at least two examiners. Additional examiners may be used if there is a significant descrepancy between the examiners.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Two class contact hours per week (seminar style), attendance of a weekly colloquium (1-2 hours per week), plus regular project supervision (1-2 hours per fortnight). In addition, as per University requirements, students will be required to spend up to 40 hours per week in private study/self-directed learning (i.e. a total of 48 hours per week).

Prerequisites


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitDepartment of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
OfferedAlfred Hospital First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Michaela Riddell

Synopsis

The unit aims for students to develop critical and analytic skills as applied to contemporary global public health and health science research, as well as providing students with advanced knowledge in specific areas of public health and health science from within a global context.
Seminars will focus on topics such as current public health thinking and practice and global dimensions of local health, as well as on skills in evidence appraisal and systematic searching. Students will be active learners through the presentation of two seminars to the class during the semester, and will lead the discussion that follows.
Students will provide a written review of a topic that is related to their specific research project that demonstrates advanced theoretical understanding of the issues and research relating to that topic.

Outcomes

By the completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  1. Discuss contemporary global approaches to research in health sciences and public health;
  2. Critically assess what is known and not known in the literature, about determinants of health in relation to selected topics cover during the seminars as well as to students' research topics;
  3. Develop a systematic search strategy on a specific topic based on a research question, encompassing the development of inclusion-exclusion criteria, a search strategy and table summaries of selected studies;
  4. Critically review the scientific literature relative to a defined research question; and,
  5. Prepare a literature review of a health issue using critical analysis.

Assessment

Hurdle requirement: Students are required to attend 80% of seminars.

Formative assessment: Feedback during seminar participation and presentations delivered (Objectives 1 - 5).

Summative assessment:
a. Two individual presentations during the semseter - one on the student's project and the second on a seperate public health and/or health science issue or topic. Presentations will be assessed using a set of assessment criteria included in the Unit Guide (30%), and,
b. A 4,000-5,000 word critical review of research papers on a specific public health and/or health science issue that will form the basis of the student's literature review for their final thesis (70%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Four class contact hours per week (seminar style). In addition, as per University requirements, students will be required to spend 20 hours per week on the unit in private study (i.e. a total of 24 hours per week).

Co-requisites

Student must be enrolled in the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Health Science, Honours degree of Bachelor of Medical Science or with permission of Chief Examiner


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Health Sciences, South Africa
OfferedSouth Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Prof Geoff Setswe

Synopsis

This unit aims to develop students' understanding and skills in the quantitative and qualitative research methods that underpin contemporary global public health and health science research, including the analysis, interpretation and reporting of data from such research. The unit introduces students to the theoretical, methodological and ethical issues underpinning contemporary global public health and health science research. It provides direction and guidance in identifying a meaningful research question and in developing the skills and knowledge needed to design and write a research proposal. It reintroduces students to quantitative and qualitative research frameworks and data analysis techniques needed both to undertake the study and to write a research report.

Outcomes

  1. Produce a research report to meet the standard required at honours level by developing an outline and plan of a research process suitable for the research project;
  2. Critique the outline and plan for a research project.
  3. Explain the characteristics of research questions and formulate a research question relevant to the research project
  4. Demonstrate a good understanding of the range of quantitative and qualitative research frameworks utilised in public health and health science research. In doing so:
    • Identify the research frameworks used in a range of research projects;
    • Select the most suitable research framework/methodology for given examples of research projects; and justify the research framework/methodology chosen for the research project;
  5. Link research paradigms or methods to research questions;
  6. Demonstrate a good understanding of data analysis methods associated with the various research frameworks. In doing so:
    • Identify the most appropriate data analysis methods for different research frameworks;
    • Select the most suitable data analysis methods for the research project; and,
    • Justify the data analysis methods chosen for the research project;
  7. Identify future research activities in which they would be interested to participate.

Fieldwork

Students may be allocated to visit a community site on a fieldwork to learn methods of community entry and how to conduct research fieldwork in different communities. This will be a supervised fieldwork visit done with the lecturer/researcher.

Assessment

Class Test (20%)
Class Presentation (20%)
Methodology Chapter (60%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Seminar and/or Online Learning Activity (3 hours)

Off-campus attendance requirements

+ Pre-Lecture & Self-directed Learning Activity (3 hours)
+ Post-Lecture Discussion Question (1 hour)
+ Unit Assessment/Assignment (4 hours)

Prerequisites

Completion of the 144 credit point, three year Bachelor of Public Health degree or equivalent

Co-requisites

HSC4102 Contemporary and global public health issues

Prohibitions

HSC4001 Health science research project 1


12 points, SCA Band 2, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Health Sciences, South Africa
OfferedSouth Africa First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Prof Geoff Setswe

Synopsis

This unit aims for students to develop critical and analytic skills as applied to contemporary global public health and health science research. It provides students with advanced knowledge in specific areas of public health and health science from a global context.
Seminars will focus on topics such as current public health thinking and practice and global dimensions of local health, as well as on skills in evidence appraisal and systematic searching. Students will be active learners through the presentation of two seminars to the class during the semester, and will lead the discussion that follows.
Students will provide a written review of a topic that is related to their specific research project that demonstrates advanced theoretical understanding of the issues and research relating to that topic.

Outcomes

  1. Discuss contemporary global public health issues.
  2. Analyse the relationship of health policy matters to public health.
  3. Develop a systematic search strategy on a specific topic based on a research question, encompassing the development of inclusion-exclusion criteria, a search strategy and table summaries of selected studies.
  4. Critically review the scientific literature relative to a defined research question.
  5. Prepare a report on a public health issue using critical analysis.
  6. Mobilise quantitative and qualitative research skills to analyse public health issues.

Assessment

Assignment (20%)
Class Presentation (20%)
Report on a contemporary public health issue (60%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Seminar and/or Online Learning Activity (3 hours)

Off-campus attendance requirements

+ Self-directed Learning Activity (3 hours)
+ Preparation of research report (1 hour)
+ Unit Assessment/Assignment/Presentation/Report (4 hours)

Prerequisites

Completion of the 144 credit point, three year Bachelor of Public Health degree or equivalent

Co-requisites

HSC4101 Public health research proposal

Prohibitions

HSC4011 Advanced studies in contemporary and global health research


24 points, SCA Band 2, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Health Sciences, South Africa
OfferedSouth Africa Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Prof Geoffrey Setswe

Synopsis

This unit aims to develop students' understanding and skills in writing a research report in public health. The unit introduces students to the skills preparing an introduction, literature review, choice of research methods, findings and discussion of these findings, conclusions and recommendations. It provides direction and guidance in identifying a meaningful research question and in developing the skills and knowledge needed to design and write a research report using reputable referencing techniques. It reintroduces students to quantitative and qualitative research frameworks and data analysis techniques needed both to undertake the study and to write a public health research report.

Outcomes

  1. Produce a research report to meet the standard required at honours level;
  2. Develop an outline and plan of a research process suitable for the research project;
  3. Formulate an introduction that clearly explains the structure and purpose of the study;
  4. Justify a choice of quantitative and/or qualitative research methods used in the study:
    • Describe the study design used
    • Describe methods of data collection used
    • Describe data analysis approach used
    • Describe measures used to protect research subjects
  5. Demonstrate skills in data analysis and reporting on findings;
  6. Link research findings with literature review in a discussion section;
  7. Draw conclusions and make recommendations from the study.

Fieldwork

Students may be allocated to visit a community site on a fieldwork to learn methods of community entry and how to conduct research fieldwork in different communities. This will be a supervised fieldwork visit done with the lecturer/researcher.

Assessment

Assignment (20%)
Class Presentation (20%)
Research Report (60%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Seminar and/or Online Learning Activity (3 hours)

Off-campus attendance requirements

+ Self-directed Learning Activity (6 hours) - data collection, analysis
+ Preparation of research report (5 hour)
+ Unit Assessment/Assignment (6 hours)

Prerequisites

HSC4102 Contemporary and global public health issues
HSC4101 Public health research proposal

Prohibitions

HSC4002 Health science research project 2


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Primary Health Care
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Belinda Lewis

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to health promotion delivered in a variety of primary care settings including hospitals, community health services, and general practice.
The common characteristics of primary care will form the framework including issues of expanded access, multi-professional service teams, optimal service coordination, and a focus on patient empowerment and the application of technology to health promotion.
Prevention and health promotion systems relevant to primary care will be examined, and the evidence and theoretical base for preventive (behavioural) counselling, brief interventions, health education practice, methods of tailoring strategies to client needs, motivational interviewing techniques, motivating change and preventing relapse will be explored.
Approaches to adopting health promotion strategies and building capacity for health promotion in others will be explored.

Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate their understanding of the frameworks that underpin health promotion in clinical settings by:

a. Identifying structured approaches and distinguishing key features of existing health promotion programs;

b. Describing the principles and charters that guide health promotion practice;

c. Comparing and contrasting health promotion needs and values of different subgroups within the community.

  1. Demonstrate the application of health promotion principles in their clinical settings by:

a. Describing capacity building approaches to improve the quality and sustainability of health promotion;

b. Identifying the contrasting the behavioral and socio-environmental approaches to promoting health in primary clinical care settings;

c. Recognising the difference between marketing and health promotion along with the ethical questions it raises.

  1. Demonstrate how they operationalise health care in their clinical settings by:

a. Reporting influences upon individual motivation and capacity to perform health behaviours;

b. Planning and producing a health promotion pamphlet or poster for their clinical setting.

  1. Demonstrate their ability to evaluate existing health promotion programs in their clinical settings by:

a. Describing a health promotion outcomes framework and how it is used in program planning;

b. Reporting their evaluation (using key principles and evidence-based approaches identified earlier) of a local health promotion activity from their clinical setting.

Assessment

Hurdle requirement: 100% attendance at tutorials and lecture program.
Evidence review: 30%
Case study report and group presentation: 40%
Analysis essay and program plan: 30%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

12 hours per week including contact time of 4 hours and 8 hours of private study


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Primary Health Care
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Belinda Lewis

Synopsis

This unit provides the basic understanding of the concept of health particularly in the primary care clinical settings. This exploration will begin at a personal level and expand to clinical settings with the broader health environment. Varied definitions and models of health will be introduced to allow a detailed exploration of illness, health risks and how individuals, families and communities use limited resources.
Differences between health of the individual and the broader population will be examined using the clinical environment as the focal point. The factors that impact the dimensions of health will be critically explored to better understand the roles of government policies, the private sector and communities. Current inequalities in resources and other factors affecting health in clinical settings will be identified.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Reflect on the implications on clinical care of their own values and assumptions regarding health and wellbeing.
  2. Review diverse definitions, concepts and interpretations of health and wellbeing and their application in the clinical context.
  3. Define, compare and contrast biomedical and ecological models of health, and describe the value of both models in the clinical context.
  4. Demonstrate how the ICF framework applies in primary clinical care.
  5. Identify the socio-cultural, economic and physical determinants of health and describe how these affect care provision in clinical situations.
  6. Apply the principles of the 'determinants of health' approach in discussing selected health issues from the National Health Priority Areas across a range of population groups and clinical settings within urban/metropolitan and rural Australia.
  7. Describe and discuss inequalities in health and utilisation of clinical services, and the underlying reasons.
  8. Critically reflect on contemporary debates regarding individual and collective responsibility for health in clinical settings and the role for governments and private enterprise.
  9. Critically reflect on the philosophical and ideological underpinnings of various professional and patient perspectives on health and examine the way these perspectives are modulated by perspectives on socio-cultural, economic and physical determinants of health in the clinical setting

Assessment

Hurdle requirement: students are required to attend 100% of tutorials
Essay (25%)
Written assignment (45%)
Final Examination (30%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

12 hours per week including contact time (1 hour lecture, 2 hour tutorial), fieldwork and self-directed learning


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Malaysia First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Richard Loiacono/ Professor Shah Yasin

Synopsis

MED1011 will introduce students to the four themes (sub-units) upon which the five-year curriculum is based:
THEME I: Personal and Professional Development: students will participate in a transition program, focusing on transition to university life, personal ethics, healthy lifestyle, group support and communication skills. This will be followed by a Health Enhancement program concentrating on self care (stress management, relaxation training, coping skills), other aspects of healthy lifestyle and group support, and introduction to the science of Mind-Body Medicine. Also included: an introduction to Ethics and Medical Law.
THEME II: Population, Society, Health and Illness: Health, Knowledge and Society Teaching will provide a framework of inquiry allowing analysis of the social aspects of medicine.
THEME III: Foundations of Medicine: The Fabric of Life provides students with foundation knowledge in genomics and cell biology in health and disease. An integral part of this theme will be the weekly problem based learning activity
(PBL). Each PBL integrates material presented to students in this and other themes throughout the week.
THEME IV: Clinical Skills: introduces students to practical clinical skills including: handwashing, sharps disposal; subcutaneous and intramuscular injecting. Students will interact with health care professionals during medical contact visits, and will be introduced to the medical interview, taking a family history, ethical aspects of medical contact visits.

Outcomes

Theme I:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Recognise the legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Discuss issues related to justice, the importance and role of advocacy within the health system
  4. Practice principles of ethical decision making and consultation with peers and teachers
  5. Describe characteristics of a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify the types of risks and errors in health care settings and the role of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Recognise the importance of research and quality improvement
  10. Recognise the need to evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify available support services
  12. Describe appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others (simulated patients, peers, teaching staff)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities health care team members and their professions and show the ability to work collaboratively within a team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Recognise own strengths and limitations, including personal factors which impact upon performance, and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Discuss different perspectives on health, illness and medical practice
  2. Describe associations between health and illness and social on access to health care
  3. Consider appropriate adaptations of medical practice to suit cultural and social circumstances
  4. Critically examine the influence their own experiences, background and culture have on their attitudes towards medicine
  5. Demonstrate basic skills in accessing research materials from personal, print and electronic sources

Theme III:

On completion of this sub-unit, students will have knowledge and understanding of:

  1. normal cell and tissue structure and formation;
  2. genes in health and disease;
  3. the immune system in health and disease;
  4. interaction between microbial organisms and the human host and the role of parasites and fungi in infectious disease;
  5. injury and the host response;
  6. the nature of neoplasia and genetic and environment factors leading its progression and spread.
  7. demonstrate an introductory level of understanding of human psychology and the neurobiological basis of human behaviour
  8. demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of the general principles, concepts and language of neuroscience that will provide a basis for the study of neural control of body systems and neurology in later semesters;

Theme IV:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview in simulated environments
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history in simulated environments
  3. Perform an appropriate examination for specified systems in simulated environments.
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in simulated environments
  5. For specified conditions, identify relevant investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Identify the required information for completion of requests for investigations.
  7. Provide a basic interpretation of results for specified investigations
  8. Outline the reasons for prioritising patient care
  9. Generate a problem list
  10. Formulate a differential diagnosis (list)
  11. Identify the function of management plans in patient care
  12. For specified conditions identify clinically appropriate medications
  13. Explain the importance of monitoring patients
  14. Explain the importance of fluid and electrolyte management
  15. Identify the importance of procedures and documentation for continuity of care
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Recognise the basic elements of patient case files

Assessment

Examinations and written assignments to account for 30% of the end of Year 1 result. Assessment of materials presented in the result for MED1011 will be a pass grade only (PGO).
Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% at designated small group teaching activities to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the 0040, 1074, 3856


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Richard Loiacono/ Professor Shah Yasin

Synopsis

THEME 1: 'Health Enhancement Program' develops strategies for personal health enhancement and ethical/legal issues relevant to professional responsibility, the doctor-patient relationship and public accountability.
THEME 2: 'Population Health' develops an understanding of epidemiology, construction of epidemiological study design, function and interpretation of statistical information and critical appraisal of research publications.
THEME 3: The scientific basis of clinical practice of the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular medicine and human life span.
THEME 4: 'Clinical Skills' develops comprehensive medical history taking skills and examination of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and peripheral nervous system. Develop an awareness of key ethical issues involved in communication with patients, family members, carers and health professionals. Rural attachment: a week based at a rural centre will focus on developing an understanding of the practice of medicine in a rural context.

Outcomes

Theme I:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Recognise the legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Discuss issues related to justice, the importance and role of advocacy within the health system
  4. Practice principles of ethical decision making and consultation with peers and teachers
  5. Describe characteristics of a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify the types of risks and errors in health care settings and the role of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Recognise the importance of research and quality improvement
  10. Recognise the need to evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify available support services
  12. Describe appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others (simulated patients, peers, teaching staff)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities health care team members and their professions and show the ability to work collaboratively within a team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Recognise own strengths and limitations, including personal factors which impact upon performance, and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and methods of biostatistics in medical research;
  2. Understand the strengths and weaknesses of different epidemiological study designs;
  3. Appreciate the role of chance, bias and confounding in epidemiological studies;
  4. Critically appraise articles in medical journals;
  5. Interpret and appreciate the clinical relevance of statistical information presented in medical research publications;

Theme III:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a knowledge and appreciation of the function of peripheral sensory systems, sensory pathways, motor pathways and the importance of sensory feedback;
  2. Understand the general and detailed organization of the limbs and back;
  3. Identify and test the muscle groups acting on the joints of the upper and lower limb, the cranio-vertebral and the intervertebral joints, and their normal range of movement;
  4. Identify the surface markings of the major joints, nerves, blood vessels, ligaments and bony features of the upper and lower limbs and vertebral column; and understand the application of imaging technologies to the musculoskeletal systems;
  5. Understand the detailed structure and function of the tissues of the musculoskeletal system, including bone, muscle, tendon, articular cartilage, ligaments and connective tissue;
  6. Demonstrate an introductory level of understanding of human psychology and human behaviour;
  7. Discuss the pathogenesis of diseases caused by bacteria and microbes;
  8. Outline the pharmacological agents used in the treatment of infectious disease.
  9. Describe the trajectory of development, and its importance to an understanding of the individual as a complete human being within a social setting.
  10. Describe the structure and function of the healthy cardiovascular system
  11. Discuss the mechanisms and effects of selected common pathologies affecting the cardiovascular system;
  12. Outline therapeutic agents commonly used to deal with disorders of the cardiovascular system;
  13. Give an account of the interactions of the cardiovascular system in the maintenance of homeostasis
  14. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of neurons, signaling mechanisms, drug actions and receptors mechanisms, and the organization, inter relationship and general function of all divisions of the nervous system; demonstrate an introductory level of understanding of human psychology and the neurobiological basis of human behaviour.

Theme IV:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview in simulated environments
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history in simulated environments
  3. Perform an appropriate examination for specified systems in simulated environments.
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in simulated environments
  5. For specified conditions, identify relevant investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Identify the required information for completion of requests for investigations.
  7. Provide a basic interpretation of results for specified investigations
  8. Outline the reasons for prioritising patient care
  9. Generate a problem list
  10. Formulate a differential diagnosis (list)
  11. Identify the function of management plans in patient care
  12. For specified conditions identify clinically appropriate medications
  13. Explain the importance of monitoring patients
  14. Explain the importance of fluid and electrolyte management
  15. Identify the importance of procedures and documentation for continuity of care
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Recognise the basic elements of patient files

Rural Attachment:

On completion of this Rural Attachment students will be able to:

  1. Recognise the importance of place to health, illness, injury and health service delivery;
  2. Describe the health, illness, community services and facilities available in a rural location;
  3. Recognise how rural health differs across gender, age, race and sexual orientation;
  4. Compare and contrast medicine in a rural context with their metropolitan experiences to date.

Assessment

Examinations and written assignments to account for 70% of the end of Year 1 result.
Assessment of materials presented in the result for MED1022 will be a pass grade only (PGO).
Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% at designated small group teaching activities to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the MBBS course codes 0040, 1074, 3856


0 points, SCA Band 3, 0.000 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Richard Loiacono/ Professor Shah Yasin

Synopsis

MED2000 provides an overall result for Year 1 & 2 MBBS based upon achievement in MED1011, MED1022, MED2031, MED2042 and the first Integrated Vertical Assessment (VIA) examination. Students will need to successfully complete MED1011, MED1022, MED2031, MED2042 and the VIA examination. A grade will be awarded for MED2000 which is based on student achievement in MED1011, MED1022, MED2031 and MED2042 and the VIA examination.

Outcomes

MED2000 is a hurdle requirement for successful completion of the MBBS course. On completion of the unit, students will have demonstrated the necessary integration of knowledge and skills developed during Years 1 - 2 of the medicine course.

Assessment

MED1011: 12.5%
MED1022: 12.5%
MED2031: 27.5%
MED2042: 27.5%
First VIA Examination: 20%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Medicine/ Bachelor of Surgery (course codes 0040)


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Monash Passport categoryInternship (Act Program)
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Malaysia First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Richard Loiacono/ Professor Shah Yasin

Synopsis

Through a 'Community Based' placement, the student develops an awareness of the sector's relevance to the practice of medicine and the socio-economic context of health and illness. In 'Information Management and Health Promotion' the student develops skills in data management and critical appraisal of evidence and knowledge to assist in clinical decision-making. 'Homeostasis: Maintaining the internal environment' enables the student to study the respiratory, renal, endocrine and haematopoietic systems, gastroenterology, nutrition and metabolism.' 'Clinical Skills' assists the student to develop clinical reasoning and focused history taking based on these major systems. Weekly Problem Based Learning (PBL) studies will integrate material presented in all themes. The Rural/urban placement focuses on the development of a perspective of experience of practising medicine in either environment.

Outcomes

Theme I:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Recognise the legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Discuss issues related to justice, the importance and role of advocacy within the health system
  4. Practice principles of ethical decision making and consultation with peers and teachers
  5. Describe characteristics of a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify the types of risks and errors in health care settings and the role of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Recognise the importance of research and quality improvement
  10. Recognise the need to evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify available support services
  12. Describe appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others (simulated patients, peers, teaching staff)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities health care team members and their professions and show the ability to work collaboratively within a team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Recognise own strengths and limitations, including personal factors which impact upon performance, and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. articulate the relationship between data, information, evidence, knowledge and informed care;
  2. demonstrate in applied situations the following:
  3. enhanced information technology skills (searching and medical database identification skills, including computer presentation skills)
  4. application of critical skills to clinical and research questions
  5. application of a range of knowledge based systems in clinical practice (bibliographic software, decision support systems);
  6. analyse the different perspectives in health promotion
  7. define, compare and contrast medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion;
  8. align a range of health promotion theories of change, ranging through individual to social;
  9. participate in the basic health promotion process of program development, planning, implementation and evaluation;
  10. systematically apply critical appraisal and knowledge management skills to evaluation of health promotion intervention strategies;
  11. identify appropriate strategies for health promotion interventions, including targeting high risk and population-based strategies;

Theme III:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. discuss the relevance of biomedical science to the practice of respiratory, endocrine, haemopoetic and renal medicine, and apply knowledge in these areas in an integrative manner to the understanding of particular cases or clinical issues;
  2. describe the structure and function of the healthy respiratory and renal, endocrine systems and the formation and function of blood;
  3. discuss the mechanisms and effects of selected common pathologies affecting these systems;
  4. outline therapeutic agents commonly used to deal with disorders of these systems;
  5. give an account of the interactions of these systems in the maintenance of homeostasis, drawing upon knowledge acquired in preceding semesters;
  6. discuss the relevance of biomedical science to the practice of medicine in the areas of endocrinology and metabolism, gastroenterology and nutrition, and apply knowledge in these areas in an integrative manner to the understanding of particular cases or clinical issues;
  7. describe the role of endocrine systems in normal and pathological function;
  8. discuss the normal growth pattern and the attendant nutritional requirements of individuals from birth to adulthood, recognise the sources of deviation from such normal patterns and appreciate the role of nutrition in health and disease, taking account of social and cultural influences;
  9. describe the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract and comprehend the pathophysiology of common symptoms and major diseases of the gastrointestinal tract;
  10. outline therapeutic agents relevant for endocrine, gastrointestinal conditions.

Student Project Cases:

On the completion of this activity students will be able to:

  1. integrate information from the four curriculum themes based on the range of learning activities, including self-directed research;
  2. integrate and synthesise information from different body systems and human perspectives in the appreciation of clinical issues;
  3. identify relevant resources and critically analyse information from a variety of sources;
  4. develop skills in problem solving and apply in a medical context;
  5. develop interpretative skills related to the evaluation of endocrine, metabolic, gastrointestinal, nutritional, reproductive and developmental information and issues, interfacing biomedical science with clinical medicine;
  6. work effectively and communicate constructively within small groups in the planning, development and implementation of teamwork tasks, with individual and group responsibilities and adherence to project timelines;
  7. discuss issues and problems in a structured manner and act as spokesperson for a group in a wider forum;
  8. apply skills in audiovisual presentations on particular topics in medicine;
  9. develop skills in preparation of written summaries in the form of notes suitable for effective communication and education;
  10. apply constructive critiques to verbal and written presentations.

Theme IV:

On completion of this sub-unit students will be able to:

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview in simulated environments
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history in simulated environments
  3. Perform an appropriate examination for specified systems in simulated environments.
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in simulated environments
  5. For specified conditions, identify relevant investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Describe the requirements for requests/ordering relevant investigations.
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations in simulated settings/scenarios
  8. Outline the reasons for prioritising patient care
  9. Generate a problem list
  10. Formulate and discuss their reasoning for a differential diagnosis (list)
  11. Outline a basic management plan for specified common problems and conditions
  12. For specified conditions identify clinically appropriate medications
  13. Explain the importance of monitoring patients
  14. Recognise the need for the management of conditions using fluid, electrolyte and blood products
  15. Identifies the importance of procedures and documentation for continuity of care
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Recognise the basic elements of patient case files

Urban Placement:

  1. Participate in specialist tutorials in relation to breast examination, ECG's and real patient encounters
  2. Review and practice Year 1 Clinical skills

Rural Placement:

  1. describe and discuss how rural contexts impact on the assessment of health conditions;
  2. recognize the importance of context and clinical reasoning in relation to focused history taking;
  3. describe and discuss how a rural context impacts on the clinical and non-clinical management of patients;
  4. analyse the ways in which rural diversity can impact on rural health, illness and clinical practice;
  5. reflect on the nature of a rural clinical practice from a clinician's perspective.

Assessment

Examinations and written assignments account for 30% of the end of Year 2 result.
Assessment of materials presented in the result for MED2031 will be a pass grade only (PGO).
Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% at designated small group teaching activities to pass this unit.
The following in semester assignments are carried out across the full year:
CBP
Rural Assessment
Urban Assessment

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the MBBS and MED2000


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Monash Passport categoryResearch Challenge (Investigate Program)
OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Richard Loiacono and Professor Shah Yasin

Synopsis

Through 'Community Based' placement, the student develops an awareness of the sector's relevance to the practice of medicine and the socio-economic context of health and illness. In 'Information Management and Health Promotion' the student develops skills in data management and critical appraisal of evidence and knowledge to assist in clinical decision-making. 'Hormones and sex growth' enables the student to examine, 'Sex, reproduction and development'. Head and neck will be a focus of learning. Students will further develop studies in neurological sciences. 'Clinical Skills' assists the student to develop clinical reasoning and focused history taking based on these areas. PBL: weekly case studies are used to integrate material presented in all themes. Rural/urban placement: a fortnight focusing on either the experience of practicing medicine in the urban or rural environments will be undertaken as in Semester 1.

Outcomes

On completion students will be able to:

Theme 1

  1. Recognise the legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Discuss issues related to justice, the importance and role of advocacy within the health system
  4. Practice principles of ethical decision making and consultation with peers and teachers
  5. Describe characteristics of a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify the types of risks and errors in health care settings and the role of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Recognise the importance of research and quality improvement
  10. Recognise the need to evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify available support services
  12. Describe appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others (simulated patients, peers, teaching staff)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities health care team members and their professions and show the ability to work collaboratively within a team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Recognise own strengths and limitations, including personal factors which impact upon performance, and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II

  1. articulate the relationship between data, information, evidence, knowledge and informed care;
  2. demonstrate in applied situations, enhanced information technology skills, application of critical skills to clinical and research questions and application of a range of knowledge based systems in clinical practice;
  3. appreciate the different perspectives in health promotion
  4. define, compare and contrast medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion;
  5. understand the application of a range of health promotion theories of change, ranging through individual to social;
  6. understand and participate in the basic health promotion process of program development, planning, implementation and evaluation;
  7. systematically apply critical appraisal and knowledge management skills to the evaluation of health promotion intervention strategies;
  8. identify appropriate strategies for health promotion interventions including targeting high risk and population-based strategies;

Theme III:

  1. discuss the relevance of biomedical science to the practice of medicine in the areas of sexuality, development and growth, and apply knowledge in these areas in an integrative manner to the understanding of particular cases or clinical issues;
  2. describe the basic processes of reproduction and early development, comprehend infertility and strategies to manage reproduction and contraception, understand how fetal conditions can determine adult disease
  3. outline therapeutic agents relevant for neurological, reproductive, and psychological conditions.
  4. Describe the anatomy of the head and neck including the intracranial region
  5. Describe the physiology of central nervous system function
  6. demonstrate an introductory level of understanding of human psychology and the neurobiological basis of human behaviour
  7. demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of neurons, signaling mechanisms, drug actions and receptors mechanisms, and the organization, inter relationship and general function of all divisions of the nervous system; demonstrate an introductory level of understanding of human psychology and the neurobiological basis of human behaviour.

Theme IV

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview in simulated environments
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history in simulated environments
  3. Perform an appropriate examination for specified systems in simulated environments.
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in simulated environments
  5. For specified conditions, identify relevant investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Describe the requirements for requests/ordering relevant investigations.
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations in simulated settings/scenarios
  8. Outlines the reasons for prioritising patient care
  9. Generate a problem list
  10. Formulate and discuss their reasoning for a differential diagnosis (list)
  11. Outline a basic management plan for specified common problems and conditions
  12. For specified conditions identify clinically appropriate medications
  13. Explains the importance of monitoring patients

Rural placement:

On the completion of this placement students will be able to:

  1. describe and discuss how rural contexts impact on the assessment of health conditions.;
  2. recognise the importance of context and clinical reasoning in relation to focused history taking;
  3. describe and discuss how a rural context impacts on the clinical and non-clinical management of patients;
  4. analyse the ways in which rural diversity can impact on rural health, illness and clinical practice;
  5. reflect on the nature of a rural clinical practice from a clinician's perspective.

Student Project Cases:

On the completion of this activity students will be able to:

  1. integrate information from the four curriculum themes based on the range of learning activities, including self-directed research;
  2. integrate and synthesise information from different body systems and human perspectives in the appreciation of clinical issues;
  3. identify relevant resources and critically analyse information from a variety of sources;
  4. develop skills in problem solving and apply in a medical context;
  5. develop interpretative skills related to the evaluation of endocrine, metabolic, gastrointestinal, nutritional, reproductive and developmental information and issues, interfacing biomedical science with clinical medicine;
  6. work effectively and communicate constructively within small groups in the planning, development and implementation of teamwork tasks, with individual and group responsibilities and adherence to project timelines;
  7. discuss issues and problems in a structured manner and act as spokesperson for a group in a wider forum;
  8. apply skills in audiovisual presentations on particular topics in medicine;
  9. develop skills in preparation of written summaries in the form of notes suitable for effective communication and education;
  10. apply constructive critiques to verbal and written presentations.

Rural placement and Urban placement- refer to MED2031.

Assessment

Examinations and written assignments account for 70% of the end of Year 2 result.
Assessment of materials presented in the result for MED2042 will be a pass grade only (PGO).
Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% at designated small group teaching activities to pass this unit.
The following in semester assignments are carried out across the full year:
CBP
Rural Assessment
Urban Assessment

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the MBBS and MED2000


12 points, SCA Band 3, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Synopsis

MED3051 is an integrated medicine/surgery curriculum based on the four themes of the medical curriculum: Personal and professional development; population, society, health and illness; foundations of medicine; and clinical skills. Evidence-based educational approaches support students in acquiring appropriate knowledge, attitudes and skills in medicine, surgery, clinical skills, evidence-based clinical practice, occupational and environmental medicine, pathophysiology, pharmacology, ethics and law. Previous learning will be extended.

Outcomes

On successful completion of Year 3/B, students are expected to be able to:

Theme I: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Apply the legal requirements and protocols to clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Recognise issues related to justice and the role of advocacy that are evident within the health system
  4. Practice and discuss ethical decision making and consultation in clinical environments
  5. Display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Describe factors that contribute to risks and errors in health care settings and the responsibilities of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Identify the activities in clinical settings that contribute to research and quality improvement in healthcare
  10. Review and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify support strategies
  12. Use appropriate environments and strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities of patient centred health care team members and their professions and opportunities to assist the health care team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Articulate own strengths, acknowledge own limitations which impact upon performance, seek support and self-advocate for improvement.
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. correctly apply principles and key steps in evidence based clinical practice;
  2. demonstrate application of the principles of evidence-based medicine to the diagnosis, management and prevention of occupational and environmental disease;
  3. elicit an accurate occupational and environmental history;
  4. describe how to certify a patient's fitness for work;
  5. effectively advise patients on the cause and prevention of the better-known occupational and environmental diseases;
  6. recognise human and institutional factors relevant to risk management in health care settings;

Theme III: Scientific basis of clinical practice

History/examination and Differential Diagnosis:

  1. Identify and apply the scientific bases that underpin the rational approach to eliciting a history and examining a patient in common diseases;
  2. Formulate a differential diagnosis and problem list relevant to the patient;

Clinical Features, Natural history, Pathogenesis and Pathology of disease

  1. Describe the natural history, pathogenesis and morphology of pathological processes related to specific diseases and conditions. Relate these to their clinical manifestations;

Recognition of Complexity in Patients' Health and Disease:

  1. Recognize that patients can present with problems due to multiple causes and contributing factors, including psychosocial factors, which impact upon their management, care and outcomes;

Investigating Health Problems:

  1. Determine and describe the scientific rationale that underpins the selection of appropriate investigations to confirm the diagnosis and guide the management of the patient;
  2. Interpret the results of investigations and relate these to the diagnosis and/or management of the patient's condition;

General Principles of Management

  1. Outline the scientific basis for the range of therapeutic approaches available to manage a patient's problem;
  2. Analyse the scientific rationale that underpins medical and surgical therapies (the scientific basis of therapies and their implementation);
  3. Select appropriate management options for patients, medical (including pharmacological) and interventional (particularly surgical);

Surgical Management

  1. Explain the key features of processes undertaken to provide surgical care for a patient, including preoperative assessment, operating room processes, anaesthetic management and postoperative care;
  2. Describe the key principles of common operations and procedures important to the effective surgical management of patients' problems;

Pharmacotherapeutics

  1. Use a rational approach, incorporating knowledge about safety, to select appropriate therapeutic drugs. Describe the basis of their mechanism of action, important aspects of their pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and drug interactions;

The Role of Research in Advancing Medical Knowledge:

  1. Identify and criticise how research contributes to the body of scientific knowledge available to medical practitioners;

Theme IV: Clinical skills

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview.
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (relevant to practice in medical and surgical units).
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments under direct, structured supervision.
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions.
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly under structured supervision.
  7. Interpret results of investigations and use data to guide patient management under structured supervision.
  8. Distinguishes priority of patient care based upon urgency.
  9. Generate a ranked problem list.
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and select the most likely options relevant for the patient.
  11. Develop management plans for common problems and conditions.
  12. Select most appropriate medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient.
  13. Monitor the patient, identifies common complications and plans an immediate response under structured supervision.
  14. Develop and implement an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use under structured supervision.
  15. Outline procedures and documentation for admissions, discharges and referrals.
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations.
  17. Accurately record case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats under structured supervision.

Assessment

Mini Case Records (MCRs) ( 70%)
Integrated clinical appraisal activity (30%)
Hurdle requirements: satisfactory attendance of over 80%, log book completion, completion of on-line tasks, satisfactory participation and performance in clinical skills activities and portfolio submission.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Approximately 13 hrs/week of structured teaching and learning, 10 hrs/week of unstructured learning in clinical settings and 10 hrs/week self directed learning (private study).

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

MED3062 and MED3200; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


12 points, SCA Band 3, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Synopsis

MED3062 is an integrated medicine/surgery curriculum based on the four themes of the medical curriculum: personal and professional development; population, society, health and illness; foundations of medicine; and clinical skills. Evidence-based educational approaches support students in acquiring appropriate knowledge, attitudes and skills in medicine, surgery, clinical skills, evidence-based clinical practice, occupational and environmental medicine, patho-physiology, pharmacology, ethics and law. Previous learning will be extended. By the end of the semester students must be capable of undertaking history and clinical examinations of patients with straightforward conditions.

Outcomes

On successful completion of Year 3/B, students are expected to be able to:

Theme 1: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Apply the legal requirements and protocols to clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Recognise issues related to justice and the role of advocacy that are evident within the health system
  4. Practice and discuss ethical decision making and consultation in clinical environments
  5. Display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Describe factors that contribute to risks and errors in health care settings and the responsibilities of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Identify the activities in clinical settings that contribute to research and quality improvement in healthcare
  10. Review and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify support strategies
  12. Use appropriate environments and strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities of patient centred health care team members and their professions and opportunities to assist the health care team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Articulate own strengths, acknowledge own limitations which impact upon performance, seek support and self-advocate for improvement.
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. correctly apply principles and key steps in evidence based clinical practice;
  2. demonstrate application of the principles of evidence-based medicine to the diagnosis, management and prevention of occupational and environmental disease;
  3. elicit an accurate occupational and environmental history;
  4. describe how to certify a patient's fitness for work;
  5. effectively advise patients on the cause and prevention of the better-known occupational and environmental diseases;
  6. recognise human and institutional factors relevant to risk management in health care settings;

Theme III: Scientific basis of clinical practice

History/examination and Differential Diagnosis:

  1. Identify and apply the scientific bases that underpin the rational approach to eliciting a history and examining a patient in common diseases;
  2. Formulate a differential diagnosis and problem list relevant to the patient;

Clinical Features, Natural history, Pathogenesis and Pathology of disease

  1. Describe the natural history, pathogenesis and morphology of pathological processes related to specific diseases and conditions. Relate these to their clinical manifestations;

Recognition of Complexity in Patients' Health and Disease:

  1. Recognize that patients can present with problems due to multiple causes and contributing factors, including psychosocial factors, which impact upon their management, care and outcomes;

Investigating Health Problems:

  1. Determine and describe the scientific rationale that underpins the selection of appropriate investigations to confirm the diagnosis and guide the management of the patient;
  2. Interpret the results of investigations and relate these to the diagnosis and/or management of the patient's condition;

General Principles of Management

  1. Outline the scientific basis for the range of therapeutic approaches available to manage a patient's problem;
  2. Analyse the scientific rationale that underpins medical and surgical therapies (the scientific basis of therapies and their implementation);
  3. Select appropriate management options for patients, medical (including pharmacological) and interventional (particularly surgical);

Surgical Management

  1. Explain the key features of processes undertaken to provide surgical care for a patient, including preoperative assessment, operating room processes, anaesthetic management and postoperative care;
  2. Describe the key principles of common operations and procedures important to the effective surgical management of patients' problems;

Pharmacotherapeutics

  1. Use a rational approach, incorporating knowledge about safety, to select appropriate therapeutic drugs. Describe the basis of their mechanism of action, important aspects of their pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and drug interactions;

The Role of Research in Advancing Medical Knowledge:

  1. Identify and criticise how research contributes to the body of scientific knowledge available to medical practitioners;

Theme IV: Clinical skills

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview.
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (relevant to practice in medical and surgical units).
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments under direct, structured supervision.
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions.
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly under structured supervision.
  7. Interpret results of investigations and use data to guide patient management under structured supervision.
  8. Distinguishes priority of patient care based upon urgency.
  9. Generate a ranked problem list.
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and select the most likely options relevant for the patient.
  11. Develop management plans for common problems and conditions.
  12. Select most appropriate medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient.
  13. Monitor the patient, identifies common complications and plans an immediate response under structured supervision.
  14. Develop and implement an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use under structured supervision.
  15. Outline procedures and documentation for admissions, discharges and referrals.
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations.
  17. Accurately record case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats under structured supervision.

Assessment

Mini Case Records (MCRs) (70%)
Integrated clinical appraisal activity (30%)
Hurdle requirements: satisfactory attendance of over 80%, log book completion, completion of on-line tasks, satisfactory participation and performance in clinical skills activities and portfolio submission.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Approximately 13 hrs/week of structured teaching and learning, 10 hrs/week unstructured learning in clinical settings and 10 hrs/week self directed learning (private study).

Prerequisites

Must have passed an (I/W) unit in {MED3051}

Co-requisites

MED3200; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Shane Bullock

Notes

Students who fail to progress in MED3051 in semester 1 must discontinue from MED3200. Unit discontinuation penalites will apply.

Synopsis

Introductory Clinical Studies integrates the learning across MED3051 and MED3062. Learning activities specific to each specialty area will be linked to the specific clinical placement and may include lectures, tutorials, case-based learning, bed- side tutorials, practical skills sessions, and specialty teaching clinics and directed learning activities.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to

  1. Demonstrate appropriate communication, and interpersonal and professional skills for hospital and community clinical settings
  2. Recognise legal and ethical issues relevant to the practice of medicine.
  3. Recognise the principles of team-work, and the role of doctors in clinical teams.
  4. Explain the economic perspective on health issues and health care.
  5. Critique evaluations of a health intervention.
  6. Identify organisational factors which impact on patient care and participate in quality improvement processes.
  7. Identify the impact of public health policy on the delivery of health care to the individual.
  8. Identify relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families.
  9. Identify relevant approaches to health education, illness prevention and rehabilitation.
  10. Apply the knowledge and concepts of basic biological, psychological and social science to common and important clinical conditions.
  11. Identify biological, psychological and social factors pertinent to understanding the illness and its management.
  12. Identify common and important illnesses, conditions and disorders.
  13. Elicit and record an accurate clinical history appropriate for the patients and the clinical context.
  14. Perform and accurately record an appropriate physical examination.
  15. Develop differential diagnoses and formulate problems.
  16. Competently perform selected clinical practices, techniques and procedures.
  17. Formulate appropriate patient-centred management plans and discuss management issues.
  18. Identify appropriate and cost-effective investigation strategies.

Assessment

Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) (55%)
Written examination (45%)
Hurdle requirements: satisfactory attendance of over 80%, satisfactory participation and performance in clinical skills activities.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

2 x 18 week semesters in continuous rotations through clinical attachments.

Prerequisites

Must have completed 2 of MED2031, MED2042, GMA2000, GMA2022

Co-requisites

MED3051 or MED3062; Students must be enrolled in 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532


0 points, SCA Band 3, 0.000 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)TBA

Synopsis

MED4000 provides an overall result for Year 3B and 4C MBBS based upon achievement in Year 3B and Year 4C. A grade will be awarded for MED4000 which is based on student achievement in MED3051, MED3062, MED3200, MED4091 and MED4200.

A student must pass MED4200 and MED4190 before a grade in MED4000 will be awarded.

Outcomes

MED4000 is a hurdle requirement for successful completion of the MBBS course. On completion of the unit, students will have demonstrated the necessary integration of knowledge and skills develop during Years 1 - 4 of the medicine course.

Assessment

MED3051: 6.125%
MED3062: 6.125%
MED3200: 22.75%
MED4190: 10.0%
VIA Exam: 30.0%
MED4200 (OSCE & EMQ component, excluding VIA): 25.0%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

MED3051, MED3062 and MED3200 or GMB3031, GMB3042 and GMB3200

Co-requisites

MED4190, MED4200; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


12 points, SCA Band 3, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Synopsis

Specialty Clinical Practices I provides clinical teaching in Children's Health, General Practice, Psychiatry and Women's Health. Students will undertake clinical placements in at least 2 specialty areas across the semester. Learning activities, tailored to the specific placement, may include lectures, tutorials, case-based learning, bedside tutorials, practical skills sessions, and specialty teaching clinics and directed learning activities. Students are expected to attend clinical settings, undertake independent learning activities and consolidate knowledge and skills from previous learning. EBCP and Health Systems Management components will be integrated with placement activities.

Outcomes

On successful completion, for the disciplines relevant to each of the clinical

placements undertaken, students are expected to be able to:

Theme I: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Apply the legal requirements and protocols to clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety.
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients).
  3. Recognise issues related to justice and the role of advocacy that are evident within the health system.
  4. Practice and discuss ethical decision making and consultation in clinical environments.
  5. Display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others.
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments and acts as a role model for junior students.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats.
  8. Explain the potential harm created by risks and errors in health care settings and the responsibilities of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care.
  9. Identify activities in clinical settings that contribute to research and quality improvement in healthcare.
  10. Review and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes.
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify support strategies.
  12. Use appropriate environments and strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals).
  13. Acknowledge the roles and responsibilities of patient centred health care team members be willing to assist by taking on appropriate roles.
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Articulate own strengths, acknowledge own limitations which impact upon performance, seek support and self-advocate for improvement.
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Explain the economic perspective on health issues and health care.
  2. Critique evaluations of a health intervention.
  3. Identify organisational factors which impact on patient care and participate in quality improvement processes.
  4. Identify the impact of public health policy on the delivery of health care to the individual.
  5. Identify relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families.
  6. Identify relevant approaches to health education, illness prevention and rehabilitation.

Theme III: Foundations of Clinical Practice

  1. Apply the knowledge and concepts of basic biological, psychological and social science to common and important clinical conditions.
  2. Identify biological, psychological and social factors pertinent to understanding the illness and its management.
  3. Identify common and important illnesses, conditions and disorders.

Theme IV: Clinical Skills

  1. Conduct a structured and organised patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history for neonates, babies, children, adolescents, and adults
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (relevant to practice in general practice, psychiatry, women's health and children's health).
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments.
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions.
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly.
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations and use to guide patient management.
  8. Prioritise patient care in order of urgency under structured supervision.
  9. Generate a ranked problem list.
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and justify the most likely options relevant for the patient.
  11. Develop and justify management plans for common problems and conditions for a patient whose illness remains undifferentiated.
  12. Select and justify their choice of medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient.
  13. Monitor the patient, recognise common complications and plan an immediate response under structured supervision.
  14. Develop and implements an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use.
  15. Perform admissions, discharges and referrals including documentation and patient preparation.
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations.
  17. Accurately record case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats.

Assessment

Summative in-semester assessment tasks (written and practical tasks) specific for the discipline area of the clinical attachments (ie Children's Health, General Practice Women's Health, and Psychiatry). Weighting 100%
Hurdle requirements for each area of clinical attachment (ie Children's Health, General Practice Women's Health) such as completion of specified clinical tasks and completion of logbooks. Successful completion of web-based Evidence-Based Clinical Practice and Health Systems Management components.
80% minimum attendance hurdle requirement

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This is a 12 point unit over 18 weeks in continuous rotations through clinical attachments.

Prerequisites

MED3051, MED3062 and MED3200 or GMB3031, GMB3042 and GMB3200

Co-requisites

MED4182, MED4200 and MED4000; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


12 points, SCA Band 3, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Synopsis

Specialty Clinical Practices II provides clinical teaching in Children's Health, General Practice, Psychiatry and Women's Health. Students will undertake clinical placements in at least 2 specialty areas across the semester. Learning activities, tailored to the specific placement, may include lectures, tutorials, case-based learning, bedside tutorials, practical skills sessions, and specialty teaching clinics and directed learning activities. Students are expected to attend clinical settings, undertake independent learning activities and consolidate knowledge and skills from previous learning. EBCP and Health Economics components will be integrated with placement activities.

Outcomes

On successful completion, for the disciplines relevant to each of the clinical

placements undertaken, students are expected to be able to:

Theme I: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Apply the legal requirements and protocols to clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety.
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients).
  3. Recognise issues related to justice and the role of advocacy that are evident within the health system.
  4. Practice and discuss ethical decision making and consultation in clinical environments.
  5. Display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others.
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments and acts as a role model for junior students.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats.
  8. Explain the potential harm created by risks and errors in health care settings and the responsibilities of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care.
  9. Identify activities in clinical settings that contribute to research and quality improvement in healthcare.
  10. Review and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes.
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify support strategies.
  12. Use appropriate environments and strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals).
  13. Acknowledge the roles and responsibilities of patient centred health care team members be willing to assist by taking on appropriate roles.
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Articulate own strengths, acknowledge own limitations which impact upon performance, seek support and self-advocate for improvement.
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Explain the economic perspective on health issues and health care.
  2. Critique evaluations of a health intervention.
  3. Identify organisational factors which impact on patient care and participate in quality improvement processes.
  4. Identify the impact of public health policy on the delivery of health care to the individual.
  5. Identify relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families.
  6. Identify relevant approaches to health education, illness prevention and rehabilitation.

Theme III: Foundations of Clinical Practice

  1. Apply the knowledge and concepts of basic biological, psychological and social science to common and important clinical conditions.
  2. Identify biological, psychological and social factors pertinent to understanding the illness and its management.
  3. Identify common and important illnesses, conditions and disorders.

Theme IV: Clinical Skills

  1. Conduct a structured and organised patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history for neonates, babies, children, adolescents, and adults
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (relevant to practice in general practice, psychiatry, women's health and children's health).
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments.
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions.
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly.
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations and use to guide patient management.
  8. Prioritise patient care in order of urgency under structured supervision.
  9. Generate a ranked problem list.
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and justify the most likely options relevant for the patient.
  11. Develop and justify management plans for common problems and conditions for a patient whose illness remains undifferentiated.
  12. Select and justify their choice of medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient.
  13. Monitor the patient, recognise common complications and plan an immediate response under structured supervision.
  14. Develop and implements an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use.
  15. Perform admissions, discharges and referrals including documentation and patient preparation.
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations.
  17. Accurately record case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats.

Assessment

Summative assessment tasks (written and practical) specific for the discipline area of the clinical attachments (ie Children's Health, General Practice Women's Health, Psychiatry) with a total of 12 assessment workload points for in-semester assessment. Weighting 100%
Hurdle requirements for each area of clinical attachment (ie Children's Health, General Practice Women's Health) such as specified clinical tasks and completion of logbooks. Successful completion of web-based Evidence-Based Clinical Practice and Health Economics components.
80% minimum attendance hurdle requirement

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This is a 12 point unit over 18 weeks in continuous rotations through clinical attachments.

Prerequisites

MED3051, MED3062 and MED3200 or GMB3031, GMB3042 and GMB3200

Co-requisites

MED4200 and MED4000; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Synopsis

Specialty Clinical Practices provides clinical teaching in Children's Health, General Practice, Psychiatry and Women's Health. Students will undertake clinical placements in at least 2 specialty areas across the semester. Learning activities, tailored to the specific placement, may include lectures, tutorials, case-based learning, bedside tutorials, practical skills sessions, and specialty teaching clinics and directed learning activities. Students are expected to attend clinical settings, undertake independent learning activities and consolidate knowledge and skills from previous learning. EBCP and Health Economics components will be integrated with placement activities.

Outcomes

On successful completion, for the disciplines relevant to each of the clinical

placements undertaken, students are expected to be able to:

Theme I: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Apply the legal requirements and protocols to clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety.
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients).
  3. Recognise issues related to justice and the role of advocacy that are evident within the health system.
  4. Practice and discuss ethical decision making and consultation in clinical environments.
  5. Display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others.
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments and acts as a role model for junior students.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats.
  8. Explain the potential harm created by risks and errors in health care settings and the responsibilities of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care.
  9. Identify activities in clinical settings that contribute to research and quality improvement in healthcare.
  10. Review and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes.
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify support strategies.
  12. Use appropriate environments and strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals).
  13. Acknowledge the roles and responsibilities of patient centred health care team members be willing to assist by taking on appropriate roles.
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Articulate own strengths, acknowledge own limitations which impact upon performance, seek support and self-advocate for improvement.
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Explain the economic perspective on health issues and health care.
  2. Critique evaluations of a health intervention.
  3. Identify organisational factors which impact on patient care and participate in quality improvement processes.
  4. Identify the impact of public health policy on the delivery of health care to the individual.
  5. Identify relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families.
  6. Identify relevant approaches to health education, illness prevention and rehabilitation.

Theme III: Foundations of Clinical Practice

  1. Apply the knowledge and concepts of basic biological, psychological and social science to common and important clinical conditions.
  2. Identify biological, psychological and social factors pertinent to understanding the illness and its management.
  3. Identify common and important illnesses, conditions and disorders.

Theme IV: Clinical Skills

  1. Conduct a structured and organised patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history for neonates, babies, children, adolescents, and adults
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (relevant to practice in general practice, psychiatry, women's health and children's health).
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments.
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions.
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly.
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations and use to guide patient management.
  8. Prioritise patient care in order of urgency under structured supervision.
  9. Generate a ranked problem list.
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and justify the most likely options relevant for the patient.
  11. Develop and justify management plans for common problems and conditions for a patient whose illness remains undifferentiated.
  12. Select and justify their choice of medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient.
  13. Monitor the patient, recognise common complications and plan an immediate response under structured supervision.
  14. Develop and implements an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use.
  15. Perform admissions, discharges and referrals including documentation and patient preparation.
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations.
  17. Accurately record case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats.

Assessment

Summative assessment tasks (written and practical) specific for the discipline area of the clinical attachments (ie Children's Health, General Practice Women's Health, Psychiatry) with a total of 24 assessment workload points for in-semester assessment. Weighting 100%.
Hurdle requirements for each area of clinical attachment (ie Children's Health, General Practice Women's Health) such as specified clinical tasks and completion of logbooks. Successful completion of web-based Evidence-Based Clinical Practice, Health Economics, and Health Systems Management components.
80% minimum attendance hurdle requirement.

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

MED3051, MED3062 and MED3200 or GMB3031, GMB3042 and GMB3200

Co-requisites

MED4200 and MED4000; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)TBA

Synopsis

Integrated Clinical Studies builds upon learning in the specialty clinical areas of Children's Health, General Practice, Psychiatry and Women's Health. Students will undertake clinical placements in each specialty clinical areas across the year. Learning activities specific to each specialty area will be linked to the specific clinical placement and may include lectures, tutorials, case-based learning, bedside tutorials, practical skills sessions, and specialty teaching clinics and directed learning activities. Students are expected to consolidate knowledge and skills through both experiential learning in clinical settings and self directed study.

Outcomes

On successful completion, for the disciplines relevant to each of the clinical placements undertaken, students are expected to be able to:

Theme I: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Demonstrate appropriate communication, and interpersonal and professional skills for hospital and community clinical settings
  2. Recognise legal and ethical issues relevant to the practice of medicine.
  3. Recognise the principles of team-work, and the role of doctors in clinical teams.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Explain the economic perspective on health issues and health care.
  2. Critique evaluations of a health intervention.
  3. Identify organisational factors which impact on patient care and participate in quality improvement processes.
  4. Identify the impact of public health policy on the delivery of health care to the individual.
  5. Identify relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families.
  6. Identify relevant approaches to health education, illness prevention and rehabilitation.

Theme III: Foundations of Clinical Practice

  1. Apply the knowledge and concepts of basic biological, psychological and social science to common and important clinical conditions.
  2. Identify biological, psychological and social factors pertinent to understanding the illness and its management.
  3. Identify common and important illnesses, conditions and disorders.

Theme IV: Clinical Skills

  1. Elicit and record an accurate clinical history appropriate for the patients and the clinical context.
  2. Perform and accurately record an appropriate physical examination.
  3. Develop differential diagnoses and formulate problems.
  4. Competently perform selected clinical practices, techniques and procedures.
  5. Formulate appropriate patient-centred management plans and discuss management issues.
  6. Identify appropriate and cost-effective investigation strategies.

Assessment

Summative assessment tasks:
OSCEs 40%,
Written examinations 40%,
Written VIA 20 %
Attendance (80%) attendance at clinical attachments

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This is a 24 point unit over 2 x18 week semesters in continuous rotations through clinical attachments.
80% minimum attendance hurdle requirement

Prerequisites

MED3051, MED3062, MED3200 or GMB3031, GMB3042 and GMB3200

Co-requisites

(MED4171 or MED4182) and MED4000; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


12 points, SCA Band 3, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester to First semester 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester to First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Juanita Fernando

Synopsis

This unit is designed to introduce the principles and practice of research and will teach skills relating to data analysis and communication of scientific ideas in oral presentations and a written thesis. Students will be able to select from a wide range of biomedical project proposals that will enable them to pursue a specific area of interest working with their chosen supervisor.

Outcomes

On completion of this course, students will be expected to demonstrate the generic attributes of a Monash graduate. The objectives of the Honours degree of Bachelor of Medical Science are to:

  1. retrieve, interpret and evaluate information in medical and other research based publications
  2. describe various methodologies in human, public health and biomedical science research
  3. discuss an aspect, issue or problem within a human, public health or biomedical science research field
  4. describe the ethical requirements for research activities in human, public health and biomedical science research
  5. design, frame, conduct and report on a small-scale project in human, public health or biomedical science research

Assessment

Hurdle requirements
Mid-Year Progress Report (Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Summative assessment:
Literature Review 75% (Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
1 Department Oral Presentation 25% (Objectives 1, 2, 3, 5)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Average weekly workload of 36 hours per week comprised of private study (library searches, reading, preparation of presentations and writing research thesis), oral presentations, and practical research activities (eg data collection and collation, laboratory work, data analysis and review).

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Students must be enrolled in the Honours Degree of Bachelor of Medical Science

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


36 points, SCA Band 3, 0.750 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester to First semester 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester to First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Juanita Fernando

Synopsis

This unit is designed to introduce the principles and practice of research and will teach skills relating to data analysis and communication of scientific ideas in oral presentations and a written thesis. Students will be able to select from a wide range of biomedical project proposals that will enable them to pursue a specific area of interest working with their chosen supervisor.

Outcomes

On completion of this course, students will be expected to demonstrate the generic attributes of a Monash graduate. The objectives of the Honours degree of Bachelor of Medical Science are to:

  1. retrieve, interpret and evaluate information in medical and other research based publications
  2. describe various methodologies in human, public health and biomedical science research
  3. discuss an aspect, issue or problem within a human, public health or biomedical science research field
  4. describe the ethical requirements for research activities in human, public health and biomedical science research
  5. design, frame, conduct and report on a small-scale project in human, public health or biomedical science research

Assessment

1 Department Oral Presentation: 5% (outcomes: 1,2,3,5)
Minor Thesis: 80% (outcomes: 1,2,3,4,5)
Faculty Presentation: 15% (outcomes 3,5)
consists of:
Faculty 5 minute thesis presentation (7.5%)
Scientfific Poster 10 minute presentation (7.5%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Average weekly workload of 36 hours per week comprised of private study (library searches, reading, preparation of presentations and writing research thesis), oral presentations, and practical research activities (eg data collection and collation, laboratory work, data analysis and review).

Prerequisites

Submission of all assessment items from MED4101

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Honours degree of Bachelor of Medical Science

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


18 points, SCA Band 3, 0.375 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Synopsis

MED5091 is focused on facilitating the transition of students into the medical workplace as beginning interns. Students will participate in a range of learning experiences which are designed to substantially enhance their clinical reasoning, diagnostic and case management skills. Students will participate in supervised clinical practice and related learning activities (learning modules). Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to broaden their knowledge and skills in self selected areas of clinical practice which may include electing a remote community, health or medicine related field.

Outcomes

On successful completion of the unit students are expected to be able to:

Professional attributes and behaviour (Theme I)

  1. Comply with legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety.
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients).
  3. Articulate issues related to justice and act as an advocate within the health system.
  4. Use ethical decision making and consultation in clinical practice including complex situations.
  5. Consistently display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others.
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments and acts as a role model for junior students.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats.
  8. Identify strategies to address the potential harm created by risks and errors in health care settings and comply with the requirements of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care.
  9. Engage in research and quality improvement activities in clinical settings where possible.
  10. Evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practice relating to patient outcomes.
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and refer them to appropriate support.
  12. Arrange appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals).
  13. Actively contribute to the health care team to maximize the team's effectiveness by participating as a student member.
  14. Engage in learning and teaching opportunities, participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities and mentor junior students.
  15. Evaluate strengths, acknowledge own limitations that impact upon professional performance and self-advocate and seek support for improvement.
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Population, Society, Health and Illness (Theme II)

  1. an understanding of the social contexts of illness and how these influence the clinical presentation and management;
  2. an understanding of the 'continuum of care' in patient management across diverse settings including rural health;
  3. an awareness of health care quality improvement activities;

Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice (Theme III)

  1. an understanding of the causative factors and pathophysiological basis of health and disease;
  2. an ability to identify and assimilate presenting problems in the development of appropriate therapeutic treatments and a management plan;
  3. an understanding of the acute, chronic, ambulatory and psychological contexts of illness and how these influence the clinical presentation and management;

Clinical Skills (Theme IV)

  1. Conduct a structured and organised patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history for neonates, babies, children, adolescents, adults and the elderly
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (in medical units, surgical units, a specialty unit and aged care)
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments.
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations and use to guide patient management
  8. Prioritises patient care in order of urgency
  9. Generate a ranked problem list
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and justify the most likely options relevant for the patient
  11. Develop and justify management plans for common problems and conditions an for a patient whose illness remains undifferentiated
  12. Selects and justifies their choice of medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient, including empirical choice of 'best guess' antibiotic
  13. Monitors the patient, recognises common complications and plans and justifies an immediate response under structured supervision
  14. Develops, implements and justifies an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use
  15. Performs admissions, discharges and referrals including documentation and patient preparation
  16. Provides structured and effective case presentations and justifies reasoning
  17. Accurately records case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats.

Assessment

There will be multiple approaches to assessment in MED5091 as follows: Apart from the PIA 'in-training' assessment, which will be graded, all assessment tasks will be a "hurdle" requirement.
Each assessment item will need to be successfully completed to Pass the unit.
1. Formative assessment;
2. Moderated online discussions;
3. Case presentations;
4. Clinical Knowledge Test;
5. Pre-Intern Appraisal (PIA);
6. Portfolio. Hurdle requirement:
Students must attend a minimum of 80% tutorials and clinical placements to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

2012 pre-req: MED4071, MED4082 and MED4000
2014 pre-req: MED4171, MED4182, MED4200 and MED4000 or GMC4151, GMC4162, GMC4200 and GMC4000

Co-requisites

MED5092, MED5102 and MED5100; Must be enrolled in MBBS or MBBS/LLB


24 points, SCA Band 3, 0.500 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia First semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Synopsis

MED5092 is focused on facilitating the transition of students into the medical workplace as beginning interns. Students will participate in a range of learning experiences which are designed to substantially enhance their clinical reasoning, diagnostic and case management skills. Students will participate in supervised clinical practice and related learning activities (learning modules). Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to broaden their knowledge and skills in self selected areas of clinical practice which may include electing a remote community, health or medicine related field.

Outcomes

On successful completion of the unit students are expected to be able to:

Professional attributes and behaviour (Theme I)

  1. Comply with legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety.
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients).
  3. Articulate issues related to justice and act as an advocate within the health system.
  4. Use ethical decision making and consultation in clinical practice including complex situations.
  5. Consistently display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others.
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments and acts as a role model for junior students.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats.
  8. Identify strategies to address the potential harm created by risks and errors in health care settings and comply with the requirements of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care.
  9. Engage in research and quality improvement activities in clinical settings where possible.
  10. Evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practice relating to patient outcomes.
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and refer them to appropriate support.
  12. Arrange appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals).
  13. Actively contribute to the health care team to maximize the team's effectiveness by participating as a student member.
  14. Engage in learning and teaching opportunities, participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities and mentor junior students.
  15. Evaluate strengths, acknowledge own limitations that impact upon professional performance and self-advocate and seek support for improvement.
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Population, Society, Health and Illness (Theme II)

  1. an understanding of the social contexts of illness and how these influence the clinical presentation and management;
  2. an understanding of the 'continuum of care' in patient management across diverse settings including rural health;
  3. an awareness of health care quality improvement activities;

Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice (Theme III)

  1. an understanding of the causative factors and pathophysiological basis of health and disease;
  2. an ability to identify and assimilate presenting problems in the development of appropriate therapeutic treatments and a management plan;
  3. an understanding of the acute, chronic, ambulatory and psychological contexts of illness and how these influence the clinical presentation and management;

Clinical Skills (Theme IV)

  1. Conduct a structured and organised patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history for neonates, babies, children, adolescents, adults and the elderly
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (in medical units, surgical units, a specialty unit and aged care)
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments.
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations and use to guide patient management
  8. Prioritises patient care in order of urgency
  9. Generate a ranked problem list
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and justify the most likely options relevant for the patient
  11. Develop and justify management plans for common problems and conditions an for a patient whose illness remains undifferentiated
  12. Selects and justifies their choice of medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient, including empirical choice of 'best guess' antibiotic
  13. Monitors the patient, recognises common complications and plans and justifies an immediate response under structured supervision
  14. Develops, implements and justifies an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use
  15. Performs admissions, discharges and referrals including documentation and patient preparation
  16. Provides structured and effective case presentations and justifies reasoning
  17. Accurately records case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats.

Assessment

There will be multiple approaches to assessment in MED5092 as follows: Apart from the PIA 'in-training' assessment, which will be graded, all assessment tasks will be a 'hurdle' requirement. Each assessment item will need to be successfully completed to Pass the unit.
1. Formative assessment;
2. Moderated online discussions;
3. Case presentations;
4. Clinical Knowledge Test;
5. Pre-Intern Appraisal (PIA);
6. Portfolio.
Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% tutorials and clinical placements to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

2012 pre-reqs: MED4071, MED4082 and MED4000
2014 pre-reqs: MED5091 or GMD5071

Co-requisites

MED5102 and MED5100; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


0 points, SCA Band 3, 0.000 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Professor Ben Canny

Synopsis

This unit indicates the honours grade obtained by a student on completion of the five years of the MBBS degree. Students are not eligible for honours if they take more than five years (not including intermitted years) to complete the course. The grade is derived from a formula approved by faculty board as outlined below.

Assessment

MED2000 or GMA2000: 30%, MED4000 or GMC4000: 60%, Year 5D: 10%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

MED4171, MED4182, MED4200, MED4000 or GMC4151, GMC4162, GMC4200 and GMC4000

Co-requisites

MED5091, MED5092 and MED5102; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Full year (extended) 2014 (Day)
Clayton Second semester to First semester 2014 (Day)
Malaysia Second semester to First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Chris Wright

Synopsis

Medical practitioners are frequently required to respond to emerging and consolidating innovations and policies related to clinical practice. MED5102 further develops the concept of 'readiness to practice' and focuses upon the development of students' understanding of the principles of Patient Safety and the related clinical competencies. The unit will provide students with an understanding of the role of research in Patient Safety and the application of these principles and practices in diverse contexts. The unit will have the capacity to respond to other issues/innovations/policy changes as they arise in medical practice.

Outcomes

At the completion of MED5102 students will be able to:

  1. identify and describe the principles of Patient Safety;

  1. recognise individual practitioner, patient and institutional methods and strategies used to ensure Patient Safety principles are upheld;

  1. demonstrate competence in Patient Safety practices in simulated settings;

  1. contribute actively to the development and implementation of Patient Safety practices; and

  1. critique and apply current scientific and medical research related to Patient Safety.

Assessment

Students will not be individually graded, but all assessments will be a hurdle requirement. Each assessment item will need to be successfully completed to pass this unit.
1. Observed Patient Safety Skills Assessment
2. Student group presentations
3. On-line assessment tasks.
Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% tutorials and clinical placements to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

2012 pre-reqs: MED4071, MED4082 and MED4000
2014 pre-reqs: MED4171, MED4182, MED4200 and MED4000 or GMC4151, GMC4162, GMC4200 and GMC4000

Co-requisites

MED5091, MED5092 and MED5100; Must be enrolled in the MBBS or MBBS/LLB


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
Overseas Summer semester A 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedKing's College London First semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas First semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)
King's College London Second semester 2014 (Day)
Overseas Second semester 2014 (Off-campus Day)

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Ms Helen Hall

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the role and primary functions of the midwife in contemporary midwifery practice. Students will explore the philosophical basis of midwifery to develop an understanding of the basic premises "being with woman", "woman centeredness" and "working in partnership" in preparation for assuming the role. Students will be introduced to professional contexts in which midwives practice exploring cultural and indigenous issues, legal and ethical aspects of midwifery care, multidisciplinary teamwork and development of professional communication skills.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student will be able to:

  1. describe the role of the midwife in contemporary midwifery practice and multidisciplinary teams
  2. discuss philosophical foundations underpinning the role of the midwife in contemporary midwifery practice
  3. explain the principles of basic midwifery care
  4. identify important principles of health promotion and primary health counselling
  5. discuss factors impacting on the care of indigenous women and those from different cultures
  6. identify key support organizations to be found in the community who provide assistance to childbearing women
  7. describe legal and ethical foundations of midwifery practice
  8. justify the need for reflective practice in the implementation of evidence informed care
  9. demonstrate effective professional communication skills
  10. demonstrate developing midwifery competence based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Written assignment: 30%
Class presentation: 20%
Examination: 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

4 hours per week for 12 weeks

Co-requisites

Nil


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Helen Hall

Synopsis

Students learning will focus on well women's experiences of recognising pregnancy, their response to becoming pregnant, the changes encountered from early pregnancy through to the early weeks after birth, the midwife's roles relating to health assessment, health promotion, primary level health counselling, and working with well women during childbearing.

Outcomes

On completion of this subject the student will be able to:

  1. Apply theoretical knowledge of midwifery to a woman-centred approach to midwifery practice
  2. Describe working with women in childbearing using the theoretical understandings gained in science units.
  3. Demonstrate developing clinical and communication skills necessary to provide women-centred midwifery
  4. Recognise the importance of women's social context in the provision of midwifery services
  5. Demonstrate beginning skills in physical assessment of women and their babies at various stages of pregnancy
  6. Assist women to understand breastfeeding including offering support to establish successful breastfeeding.
  7. Outline the relative merits of different choices in infant nutrition
  8. Document the ongoing relationship with the women they are following through in a way that reflects their own involvement and actions and the rationale for these
  9. Demonstrate midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Practice enquiry (written assignment: 2500 - 3000 words): 40%
Examination (2 hours): 60%, hurdle
Clinical skills assessment: (Pass/Fail)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

12 hours per week over 11 weeks

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course code 3562 or 3953 or 4514


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland First semester 2014 (Flexible)
Peninsula First semester 2014 (Flexible)
Coordinator(s)Mary Anne Biro(Peninsula), Ms Carolyn Bailey (Gippsland)

Synopsis

This unit will provide the foundation knowledge required by midwifery students to effectively care for women during preconception through to early parenting. The focus will be on the role of the midwife as a primary carer in relation to: the preparation of women for pregnancy; physiological and psychological adaptation of women during pregnancy and birth, and the first weeks after birth; and care of women and their babies during this continuum.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student will be able to:

  1. Outline the role of the midwife in assessment of fetal and maternal well-being in pregnancy, labour, birth and the puerperium;
  2. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the female and male reproductive systems;
  3. List key events in the continuum of embryonic and fetal development including the adaptation of the baby at birth;
  4. Describe the anatomical, physiological and hormonal changes and processes that occur in the woman's body during pregnancy, labour, birth and the puerperium;
  5. Describe the process of labour and birth;
  6. Briefly describe the anatomy of the breast and physiology of lactation;
  7. Describe the routine screening and basic diagnostic tests in pregnancy assessment;
  8. Outline the role of the midwife in caring for women experiencing the minor disorders of pregnancy; and
  9. Demonstrate developing skills in the appraisal and use of evidence to inform clinical practice.

Assessment

Class tests x5 (10% each): 50%
Examination (2 hours): 50%
Students must achieve a pass in the examination to pass the unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

12 hours: two (2) hour tutorial each fortnight

Co-requisites

BMA1901 and must be enrolled in course code 3563 or 3953 or 4514


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland First semester 2014 (Flexible)
Peninsula First semester 2014 (Off-campus)
Coordinator(s)Ms Carolyn Bailey (Gippsland), Ms Helen Hall (Peninsula)

Synopsis

The focus of this unit is to develop midwifery knowledge and skills related to the transition from pregnancy to labour and normal childbirth. Pain relief and comfort during labour as well as interventions to assess the progress of labour will be explored. Mechanisms of normal labour and management of childbirth complications will be overviewed. The focus of midwifery care within the unit is that of a midwife-women partnership model. The role of partner and family for birth support is also analysed.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, the student will have had the opportunity to:

  • demonstrate knowledge regarding comprehensive assessment and care of a woman and her baby during the birth process;
  • explore the philosophical, physiological, psychosocial, spiritual, cultural and environmental factors influencing the birth process;
  • identify a woman's need for privacy, dignity and respect, as well as the right to be informed and make decisions regarding care;
  • explore principles of clinical decision-making and evidence-based practice when providing women-centred care during the process of birth;
  • examine theoretical concepts surrounding pain assessment in midwifery practice during the birth process;
  • identify the role of the midwife in assisting women work with pain associated with childbirth;
  • examine pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods utilized to assist women to work with pain during childbirth;
  • explore the role of the midwife in assisting the woman requiring assisted vaginal and operative birth;
  • identify the midwife's scope of practice and collaboration with other members of the healthcare team, where appropriate;
  • critique the implications of obstetric interventions, and use of technology upon the woman and her family; and,
  • demonstrate beginning level competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Written assignment (2,000 words):40%
2 Online quizzes (multiple choice) (invigilated): 20%
Examination (2 hours):40%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Must have passed units BMA1901, MID1002, MID1003 and one of (BMA1912, BMS1902)

Prohibitions

MID2005


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Helen Hall (Peninsula)

Synopsis

Midwifery is a highly-skilled profession. This practice-based unit will provide the scope for students to continue developing midwifery specific skills and consolidate a level of competence that can be augmented by further learning in practice. It exposes students to variations from normal childbearing that may arise. Students will be provided with opportunities to develop skills and knowledge that will enable them to care effectively for women experiencing these alterations. This unit runs alongside MID2004 Being with Birthing Women.

Outcomes

Following completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the basic principles of pharmacology, therapeutic drug administration and monitoring as they relate to midwifery practice
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in calculation of drug dosages for administration of medications by a variety of routes
  3. Demonstrate safe clinical practice in relation to drug administration based on sound pharmaceutical knowledge
  4. Apply theoretical concepts when working with birthing women; 5. Describe variations from normal that may arise during pregnancy, labour, birth and the postnatal period and the midwife's role in managing these
  5. Demonstrate effective communication, counselling and pastoral expertise when caring for women and their families
  6. Undertake comprehensive assessment of birthing women and their babies during the childbearing process
  7. Employ a woman-centred approach to midwifery care supported by assessment and evidence based practice
  8. Respect the rights, values and cultural beliefs of women and families expressed during the birthing process by creating a culturally appropriate environment for the woman and her partner
  9. Under supervision, apply a variety of pharmacological and non pharmacological pain management methods for labouring women
  10. Work in collaboration with other members of the health care team to provide optimum care of the birthing family
  11. Demonstrate midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Essay: 50%
Clinical practice (Hurdle requirement): Pass/Fail
Mastery calculation test (Hurdle requirement): Pass/Fail
Examination (2 hours): 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Must have passed BMA1901, MID1001, MID1002, MID1003 and must have passed one of BMA1912 or BMA1902

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ms Gayle McLelland

Synopsis

Midwifery is a highly-skilled profession, hence time and scope to advance practical skills and knowledge is paramount for developing safe and responsive midwives. This practice unit will allow for further development of midwifery skills and identity, whilst incorporating new knowledge and skill. Students will explore complications that can arise during, but are unrelated to, childbearing processes. Emphasis in the unit will be placed on developing physical health assessment skills for identifying and managing a range of medical and surgical conditions that may arise. In addition, pharmacological concepts will be applied in the management of such conditions.

Outcomes

On completion of this subject, the student will be expected to:

  1. Develop a sense of becoming a midwife with emerging confidence and competence;
  2. Articulate attitudes, beliefs and values towards women and childbearing within a diverse cultural context;
  3. Perform accurate physical health assessment skills with both pregnant and non-pregnant women;
  4. Describe a range of medical and surgical conditions that may complicate childbearing;
  5. Discuss the midwifery management for medical and surgical conditions that may arise during childbearing;
  6. Describe implications of pharmacological agents used in the management of medical conditions during childbirth;
  7. Implement appropriate care for women experiencing variations from normal childbearing;
  8. Critically reflect on self and practice as a midwife;
  9. Explain the nursing implications of caring for patients receiving drug therapy;
  10. Explore and evaluate the educational needs of clients in relation to their pharmacology and health status;
  11. Demonstrate safe clinical practice in relation to drug administration based on sound pharmaceutical knowledge;
  12. Explain the principles of drug treatment in common disease and non disease states or conditions, resuscitation and poisoning;
  13. Administer medications and document accurately under supervision of registered staff and/or clinical teacher to demonstrate safe clinical practice in the midwifery practice setting;
  14. Implement evidence-informed care when working with women;
  15. Demonstrate competency according to the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife;
  16. Document the ongoing relationship with the women they are following through in a way that reflects their own involvement and actions and the rationale for these, as well as the women's actions and attitudes and responses to midwifery care.

Assessment

Case study (2,500 - 3,000 words): 50%
Clinical practice assessments (Hurdle requirement): pass/fail
Mastery Calculation Test: (Hurdle Requirement): Pass/Fail
Examination (2 hours): 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

12 hours per week for 12 weeks

Prerequisites

MID2006 and one of MID2004 or MID2005


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)TBA

Synopsis

Midwifery is a highly skilled profession.
This unit will enable the student to develop skills and confidence in the full scope of midwifery practice. Debate and analyse current trends in the provision of birthing services including issues sensitive to rural and urban differentials including specialist follow up and access to acute and specialized services. Students will be provided with both 'simulated' and 'real' opportunities to develop skills and knowledge that will enable them to provide effective care to birthing women experiencing variations from normal childbearing.
The clinical practice component will provide students with opportunities to incorporate theoretical learning directly into midwifery practice.

Outcomes

  • Critically examine the socio-political and cultural debate in the provision of birthing services to women and their families in Australia and globally;
  • Debate on the accessibility and equity to maternity services for women in the rural setting;
  • Demonstrate safe clinical practice based on sound theoretical knowledge and reasoning;
  • Discuss and critically analyse variations from normal that may arise during labour and birth and the midwife's role in managing these;
  • Undertake comprehensive assessment of birthing women and their babies during the childbearing process;
  • Demonstrate understanding and interpretation of women's rights, values and cultural beliefs in creating an appropriate and culturally safe environment for women and their partners to birth;
  • Demonstrate their developing knowledge and application of the variety of pharmacological and non pharmacological pain management methods for labouring women;
  • Demonstrate skills in advocacy, decision making and referral when working as part of the multidisciplinary team especially in an environment of complexity;
  • Implement evidence-based holistic care for women, babies and their families across the childbearing process;
  • Employ reflective practice strategies to develop understanding of diverse midwifery practice; and,
  • Demonstrate midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for Midwives.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement 160 hours

Assessment

Written assignment, 50% (2500);
Exam: 50%, (3hrs);
Clinical practice assessment: Fail/Pass

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Students will be on campus for 10 weeks with one week revision and 4 weeks will be spent in clinical practice. Four of those weeks are included in this unit. The weekly on campus workload requirement for the unit will be:
Lectures: 1 x 2 hours x 10 weeks = 20 hours
Tutorials: 1 x 2 hours x 10 weeks = 20 hours
Clinical: 160 hours
Individual Study: 120 hours
Total: 320 hours

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Prohibitions


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Carole Gilmour (Peninsula)

Synopsis

This theoretical unit will assist students to acquire foundational knowledge of the care of babies with special needs. Students will have the opportunity to study the circumstances that commonly result in a baby being admitted to a Level Two Nursery. The issues confronting the infant and family during this period will be explored as well as the role of the midwife in facilitating health and wellbeing of the infant and family. Students will reflect upon and debate the ethico-legal issues involved in caring for a baby with special needs.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students will have had the opportunity to:

  1. explore circumstances that may necessitate admission of a baby to a Level Two Nursery
  2. evaluate the Level Two Nursery environment and its potential to impact upon the baby and family
  3. examine the role of the midwife within the context of the Level Two Nursery multidisciplinary team
  4. utilise clinical decision-making strategies to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the care required for the baby and the family
  5. demonstrate an appreciation of the family's need for privacy, dignity and respect, as well as their right to be informed and to make decisions regarding care of their baby
  6. develop understanding of evidence-based care for the baby and family
  7. debate the ethico-legal issues which arise in the care of babies with special needs.

Assessment

Written assignment (1500 words): 30%
Guided study activities (2 x 500 words): 20%
Examination (2 hours): 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

3562 Bachelor of Midwifery or 3953 Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery or 4514 Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Midwifery


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)TBA

Synopsis

This unit will focus on human lactation, breastfeeding and infant nutrition. It will provide opportunities for students to analyse critically socio-cultural dimensions related to lactation and nutrition and consolidate knowledge and skills to support women in making infant feeding choices. In addition, this unit provides the opportunity for students to apply principles of lactation, breastfeeding and infant nutrition to practice. The unit will facilitate students' application of relevant codes to midwifery practice.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students will have had the opportunity to:

  1. critically examine socio-cultural dimensions of baby nutrition and breastfeeding, in Australia and globally;
  2. describe the anatomy and physiology of the human female breast and process of lactation;
  3. explore how a baby breastfeeds and situations where the baby and mother have special needs;
  4. identify strategies which promote and protect breastfeeding;
  5. identify factors impacting upon breastfeeding and baby nutrition;
  6. explore how to assist women and infants experiencing breastfeeding difficulties; and,
  7. reflect upon and critically examine one's own values and beliefs in respect to the dignity, worth and spirituality of women and infant dyads and families.

Assessment

Written assignment (2,000 words): 40%
Student presentation (20 minute presentation and poster): 40%
Case study (1000 words):20%

Chief examiner(s)


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Peninsula: Helen Hall Gippsland: TBA

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the broad range of therapies listed under the umbrella term of 'complementary and alternative medicine '(CAM). Students will have the opportunity to consider the underlying philosophy and reasons why the treatments have become increasingly popular in a contemporary health care setting. Using an evidence based approach, the benefits and risks of the major modalities will be considered. The concept of 'integrative medicine' and the role and responsibilities of health care professionals will also be explored.

Outcomes

On completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and philosophy of CAM
  • Explore the reasons people integrate CAM into their health care
  • Identify the advantages and challenges of an evidence based approach to CAM
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major CAM modalities
  • Critically discuss the role of CAM in modern health care
  • Describe the ethical, legal and professional issues when integrating CAM into midwifery/nursing practice

Assessment

Written assignment (3,000 words) (40%)
Poster presentation (group activity) (40%)
Quiz (invigilated) (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

4 contact hours per week


12 points, SCA Band 1, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Gayle McLelland

Synopsis

This theory and practice unit introduces students to the complexities of childbearing and emergency birthing challenges that women may experience during pregnancy, labour and birth and the first weeks after birth. The focus is on students developing their knowledge and skills relating to midwifery and obstetric management of these challenges. Emphasis is given to the collaborative role of the midwife, referral, use of medical technology, obstetric intervention, and the implications for women, their babies, and midwives. Whilst recognising the role of other healthcare practitioners, midwifery care will be central. Students will be introduced to the use of medical technology and obstetrical intervention whilst maintaining a woman-centred focus.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

  1. discuss the role of the midwife and collaborative practice related to challenges, deviations from normal and interventions during the childbearing period;
  2. discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis, evidence for care and expected outcomes associated with selected specific conditions that affect pregnancy, labour and birth, and the first few weeks after birth;
  3. discuss and demonstrate an understanding of pharmacologogical management in the care of the complex woman
  4. apply appropriate knowledge to develop and implement plans of care for women experiencing complex challenges in childbearing;
  5. discuss and critique the use of screening tests and technologies available for women during pregnancy;
  6. discuss and critique interventions in pregnancy, labour and birth and their management from the perspective of the midwife, the health care team and the woman;
  7. discuss the identification and management of a range of emergency situations in pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period;
  8. demonstrate the ability to identify and manage selected emergencies in a simulated setting;
  9. demonstrate the ability to work effectively within a multidisciplinary team;
  10. discuss the range of physical health problems women may experience following childbirth;
  11. discuss grief situations related to women, families and the midwife following pregnancy loss;
  12. document the ongoing relationship with the women and families that the midwifery student follows through in a way that reflects their own involvement and actions; and
  13. demonstrate beginning level midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Cumulative Assessments includes:

Formative assessment:
Guided study activities
Reflective journaling exercises

Summative assessment:
Group presentation (20 mins): 20%
Written assignment (2,500-3,000 words): 30%
Examination (3 hours): 50%
Clinical skills assessments (hurdles): (Pass/Fail)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Lectures - 2 hours per week (24 hours)
Tutorials/Clinical Laboratories - 2 hours per week (24 hours)
Online Guided Learning Activities - 2 hours per week (24hours)
Clinical placement - 2 days per week (16 hours) for 10 weeks (160 hours)
Student directed study - 80 hours

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Bachelor of Midwifery: MID2102, Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery: MID1002, MID2105

Co-requisites

3562 Bachelor of Midwifery or 3953 Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery or 4514 Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Midwifery


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland First semester 2014 (Flexible)
Coordinator(s)Ms Jan Jones (Gippsland)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to childbearing and emergency birthing obstacles that women may experience. Midwifery and obstetric management of childbearing obstacles will be explored. Emphasis is given to the collaborative role of the midwife, referral, use of medical technology, obstetric intervention, and the implications for women, their babies, and midwives.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student will be able to:

  1. evaluate collaborative practice within challenges, disturbances and interventions during childbearing
  2. examine screening tests and innovative technologies available to women during pregnancy
  3. examine the pathophysiology, diagnosis, evidence for care and expected outcomes associated with selected challenges in pregnancy
  4. discuss the causes, identification, effects and management of disturbances in the rhythms of labour and birth
  5. identify interventions in pregnancy, labour and birth and their management from the perspective of the midwife and health care team
  6. identify factors that indicate potential for maternal and/or unborn baby life threatening emergencies
  7. describe the management of a range of emergency situations in pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period
  8. describe the range of physical health problems women may experience following childbirth
  9. discuss grief situations related to women, men and the midwife following pregnancy loss
  10. demonstrate beginning level midwifery competency based upon the ANMAC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Written assignment (2000 words): 30%
Guided study activitiy (1000 words): 20%
Examination (2 hours): 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ms Jan Jones (Gippsland)

Synopsis

This practice unit complements the theory unit Childbearing obstacles and will focus on students developing their knowledge and skills relating to the obstacles women may experience during pregnancy, labour and birth and the first weeks after birth. Emphasis is given to the recognition of problems and the collaborative and referral role of the midwife. Whilst recognising the role of other healthcare practitioners, midwifery care will be central. Students will be introduced to the use of medical technology and obstetrical intervention whilst maintaining a woman-centred focus.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

  1. apply appropriate knowledge in the care of a woman experiencing obstacles in childbearing;

  1. develop plans of care for women experiencing obstacles in childbearing;

  1. demonstrate understanding of specific conditions that affect pregnancy, labour and birth, and the first few weeks after birth;

  1. evaluate the implications of obstetric interventions in maternity care;

  1. critique the use of technology in maternity care;

  1. demonstrate beginning skills in the use of technology in midwifery and obstetric practice;

  1. demonstrate the ability to manage emergencies;

  1. demonstrate the ability to practice within a multidisciplinary team;

  1. facilitate woman's access to appropriate community resources;

  1. document the ongoing relationship with the women and families that the midwifery student follows through in a way that reflects their own involvement and actions and the rationale for these, as well as the families' actions and attitudes and responses to midwifery care; and

  1. demonstrate midwifery competency based on the selected ACMI Competency Standards

Assessment

Reflective exercise (1500-2000 words): 40%
Creative project and presentation: 30%
Emergency Skill assessment - OSCEs x 2 (Note: this is a hurdle requirement)
Associated class test: 30%
OSCE: Pass/Fail; must be passed in order to pass the unit

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Lectures - 2 hours per week (24 hours)
Tutorials/Clinical Laboratories - 2 hours per week (24 hours)
Clinical placement - 160 hours

Prerequisites

Two units in MID2004, MID2006 or MID2105


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Off-campus)
Coordinator(s)Dr Meredith McIntyre

Synopsis

Through introduction of the broader womens health context, the unit explores the primary and collaborative role of the midwife working with women experiencing common women's health problems and their responses to these experiences. Students will be introduced to the physical and psychological aspects associated with selected womens health problems. The issue of women's experience of 'what is happening to me' and 'woman's sense of self' will be explored. The focus will be on fostering a positive self-image for women through facilitating participation in informed decision-making and taking responsibility for self-care and optimising wellness.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to: describe the essential components to be considered when performing a comprehensive women's health assessment; discuss the principles of primary health care in the promotion of health and wellness with diverse groups of women experiencing treatment for a range of women's health problems; discuss common health problems women may experience throughout various life stages; describe physical and psychological aspects associated with selected women's health problems; identify the range of responses a woman may experience when confronted with a body altering health problem; explore strategies to promote women's participation in informed decision-making and taking responsibility for self-care; relate reflective practice and the implementation of evidence-informed care to quality care in midwifery practice; and demonstrate beginning level midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Online Quiz: 10%
Written assignment (2000 words): 30%
Examination: 60% (Hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Midwifery, Honours degree of Bachelor of Midwifery or Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Carole Gilmour (Peninsula)

Synopsis

This unit will focus on students developing knowledge and skills relating to midwives and nurses working in partnership with women experiencing breast and other women's reproductive health concerns. It will include care of women experiencing diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures within the context of reproductive health, including women's cancers and urinary conditions. Students' learning will focus on the role of the midwife or nurse as a provider of primary care for women across the reproductive health lifespan with emphasis on skill development in women's health assessment, promoting wellness, discharge planning, woman-centred care planning, care delivery and evaluation.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able:

  1. describe the role of the midwife/nurse as the provider of primary care for women throughout the reproductive health lifespan;
  2. demonstrate the required skills when undertaking a women's health assessment:
  3. describe health promotion strategies aimed at improving women's health across the lifespan;
  4. evaluate the physical and psychological health needs in the care of women experiencing gynaecological procedures, breast surgery and urinary procedures;
  5. develop care and discharge plans for women undergoing diagnostic/therapeutic procedures related to reproductive and breast health concerns, in an acute care setting;
  6. demonstrate the ability to employ reflective practice and evidence-informed care.

Assessment

Formative:
Journaling exercises, online discussions

Summative:
Written assignment (2,500-3,000 words) 30%
Presentation (20 minute group presentation) 20%
Examination (2 hours): 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Flexible. This unit will require student attendance on campus for a maximum of the equivalent of 4 hours per week for 12 weeks.

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Ms Jan Jones (Gippsland), Dr Carole Gilmour (Peninsula)

Synopsis

This unit will assist students within the context of the family to apply, in the nursery, foundational knowledge of the caring for babies with special needs. The student will gain beginning skills necessary for a midwife to be a competent member of the multidisciplinary team. Supervised practice in the Level two Nursery will facilitate the development of ACMI (Inc) competencies, where reflection and utilisation of evidence is required to meet the varied needs of babies with special needs and the family. Experience in this environment will allow the student to appreciate the complexity of the family experience.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

  1. demonstrate understanding of the circumstances that necessitate admission of a baby to a Level Two Nursery;

  1. evaluate the environment of the nursery and implement strategies to promote the wellbeing of the baby and family;

  1. develop competency within the context of the multidisciplinary Health Care team;

  1. utilise a clinical decision making process to apply the necessary knowledge and understanding required to meet the needs of the baby and family in the nursery;

  1. apply strategies for maintaining the family's need for privacy, dignity and respect, as well as their right to be informed and to make decision regarding care of their baby;

  1. facilitate family involvement with the care of the baby with special needs;

  1. employ reflective practice and implement evidence based care for babies and their families;

  1. facilitate transition of the baby and family from hospital to home;

  1. document the ongoing relationship with the women and families that the midwifery student follows through in a way that reflects their own involvement and actions and the rationale for these, as well as the families' actions and attitudes and responses to midwifery care; and

  1. demonstrate midwifery competency based on the selected ACMI Competency Standards.

Assessment

Essay (2500 words): 40%
Presentation (20 minutes): 20%
Examination (2 hour): 40%
Hurdle requirement (Clinical assessment): Pass/Fail

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This unit will require student attendance on campus and/or in practice for a maximum of 12 hours per week for 12 weeks. There will be time allocated in practice for students to complete clinical assessment.

Co-requisites


12 points, SCA Band 1, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ms. Suzanne Willey

Synopsis

This unit provides students with a comprehensive and clinically meaningful final preparation for transition to practice as a competent beginning level midwife. The unit provides students with the opportunity to explore in detail a range of midwifery and medically led models of care and the midwifery leadership necessary to promote the profession, providing childbearing women with choice in the care they receive. Students are provided with the opportunity to explore contemporary midwifery practice, regulatory and professional issues and identify evidence informed midwifery practices.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit students will have had the opportunity to:

  1. reflect critically upon the role that women-centred care and midwifery led models of care play in the Australian maternity care context;
  2. appraise contemporary and evidence-based midwifery practice;
  3. discuss challenges of autonomous practice and midwifery leadership;
  4. demonstrate skill in ethical decision making in the identification of appropriate solutions to complex midwifery issues;
  5. demonstrate proficiency in the implementation of planned midwifery care; and,
  6. demonstrate midwifery competency based on the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Essay (3,000 words) (40%)
Case Study (3,000 words) (60%)
Clinical placement with clinical assessment (160 hours) (Fail/Pass)
Clinical portfolio with all minimum requirements completed (Fail/Pass)

Students must pass the clinical assessment to pass the unit. Students must submit the clinical portfolio for audit in order to be course completed.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

This is a flexible unit with a number of compulsory on campus workshops.

One four hour orientation session and three four hour compulsory on-campus workshops: 16 hours
Self-directed learning: 60 hours
Clinical placement: 240 hours
Total: 316 hours

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Ms Carolyn Bailey (Gippsland), Ms Meredith McIntyre (Peninsula)

Synopsis

This practice unit provides students with a comprehensive and clinically meaningful final preparation for transition to practice as a competent first level registered midwife, in an area of their choosing. The unit utilises principles of adult learning to enable students to explore an area of special interest such as midwifery practice in rural and remote locations, neonatal intensive care nursery and care of childbearing women at risk.

Outcomes

Having successfully completing this unit, it is expected that the student will:

  1. be able to apply principles of adult learning to address an identified learning need;
  2. explain factors affecting communication and negotiation in the midwifery context;
  3. synthesise a broad range of knowledge from previous subjects to demonstrate an integrated bio-psychosocial insight into a selected area of midwifery practice; and
  4. selectively apply current research findings relevant to the nominated field of study.

Clinical Objectives

At the completion of this unit student will be able to:

  1. demonstrate safe midwifery practice based on sound theoretical knowledge and reasoning;
  2. perform detailed physical health assessment of childbearing women and newborns;
  3. resolve midwifery practice problems appropriately;
  4. proficiently implement midwifery care as planned;
  5. demonstrate sensitivity to the cultural dimensions of care;
  6. practice with increasing independence and incorporate current research findings into clinical practice; and
  7. demonstrate midwifery competency based on the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

6 x on-line discussions to expand and explore knowledge (500 words each): 30%
Complex case study of Mother and baby (3000 words): 70%
Clinical Assessment: Pass/Fail. Students must pass the clinical assessment to pass the unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

4 hours teacher directed; 240 hours clinical practice

Prerequisites

Must have passed MID3000 OR MID3103 and MID3104

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Midwifery or Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery


12 points, SCA Band 1, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Flexible)
Coordinator(s)Mary Anne Biro

Synopsis

The unit will prepare students with the theoretical knowledge and skills to assess, examine and initiate emergency management on the newborn infant. Anatomy and physiology relating to the newborn infant and human lactation will be explored. Students will develop an understanding of multidisciplinary care and collaborative practice in the management of sick newborn infants in a Level II Nursery. In addition, students will critically analyze all nutritional choices for well and sick babies and develop an understanding of the socio-cultural elements surrounding the care of newborn and their families.

Outcomes

  1. Critically examine the social-cultural context in the provision of care to babies and their families in Australia and globally;
  2. Examine the changes in anatomy and physiology of the fetus and newborn infant and describe successful adaptation to the extrauterine environment;
  3. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the human female breast and process of lactation;
  4. Apply strategies which promote and protect breast feeding;
  5. Explore the nutritional choices available and the factors that impact upon women's decision making regarding feeding their babies;
  6. Identify normal variations in the newborn period and provide appropriate management strategies;
  7. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in resuscitating and stabilising a baby;
  8. Identify the circumstances and conditions that may necessitate admission of a baby to a Level Two nursery
  9. Evaluate the Level Two Nursery environment and its impact upon the woman, her baby and family;
  10. Utilise the clinical decision making process to demonstrate evidence-based knowledge and understanding of the care required by the baby and the family;
  11. Demonstrate an appreciation of the family's need for privacy, dignity and respect, as well as their right to be informed and to make decisions regarding care of their baby;
  12. Demonstrate the ability to practice within a multidisciplinary team in an environment of complexity;
  13. Implement evidence-based holistic care for women, babies and their families across the childbearing process;
  14. Employ reflective practice strategies to develop understanding of diverse midwifery practice; and,
  15. Demonstrate midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for Midwives.+ Critically examine the social-cultural context in the provision of care to babies and their families in Australia and globally.

Assessment

Written assignment (2,500 words) (25%)
Case study (2,500 words) (25%)
Exam (3 hours) (50%) (Students must achieve a pass in the final examination to pass the unit) (Hurdle)
Clinical practice assessment (Pass/Fail) (Students must pass clinical placement to pass the unit) (Hurdle)
Linked neonatal skills assessments x 5 (Pass/Fail)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories: 54 hours
Clinical: 96 hours
Individual Study: 162 hours
Total: 312 hours

Prerequisites

MID2004, and either MID2006 or MID2105

Prohibitions

MID2107, MID2108, MID2109


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedGippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula First semester 2014 (Flexible)
Coordinator(s)Maureen Miles

Synopsis

This unit focuses on the interplay between the socio-political issues that pervade the clinical arena of midwifery. These include for example how economic and class factors impact on vulnerable populations who are pregnant or giving birth. It facilitates the student to a greater understanding of vulnerability in childbearing women.
The unit also includes issues such as violence within the family, child abuse, sexual assault drug abuse and associated pathologies. The special needs of Indigenous women and their families will be addressed. Additionally, the birthing needs of refugees and asylum seekers and their families will be explored. The emphasis of the unit will be grounded in the philosophy of adult learning encouraging the student to be self-directed in the identification of their learning needs.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. identify common vulnerabilities within society and how these impact on childbearing women
  2. develop a range of problem solving, decision-making and time management strategies that enhance the organisation of clinical midwifery care to vulnerable groups of childbearing women;
  3. incorporate and evaluate ethically and culturally relevant midwifery interventions for vulnerable women across the birthing journey including cultural identity and racism;
  4. critically reflect on their own actions in the professional partnership role with vulnerable women and on the nature of midwifery practice in relation to clients' health situations;
  5. develop strategies of leadership, management, teamwork and interdisciplinary collaboration in the provision of quality midwifery care when being with vulnerable women, and
  6. apply principles of adult learning to identify their specific learning needs.

Assessment

1. Poster and abstract and presentation that address a socio-political issue that influences childbearing women, families and midwifery practice. 60%
2. Reflective essay on specific vulnerabilities of the student's choice, that affect childbearing women and their families 20% (Objectives 1,2,4).
3. Critical analysis of a contemporary journal article that addresses socio-political issues of vulnerability in midwifery practice 20% (Objectives 1,2,3,4,5).
4. Clinical Practice (Clinical Hurdles) Pass/Fail

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

116 hours total study

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Biomedical Sciences
Monash Passport categoryDepth (Enhance Program)
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Ramesh Rajan

Synopsis

This unit examines how humans conceptualize, respond to and treat illness and well-being.
It is a Monash Passport II "Depth" unit designed to help students to broaden and deepen their understanding of the world from different disciplinary bases. These units will be linked to the 'Enhance' Program of The Monash Passport II, a distinctive suite of programs in which students are given the opportunity to develop a range of skills and abilities that not only serve as a foundation for career development, but can also be applied to transform local and international communities. Successful completion of the depth units will be noted in both student transcripts and in Australian Higher Education Graduation Statements (AHEGS).
This unit will use a case-based and thematic approach to understand humans approach illness and well-being. Two study areas will be used, from a pool of 6-8 broad-ranging conditions which may include areas such as Obesity and the formation of body image, Autism and awareness of self and others, Schizophrenia and concepts of free will, Depression and the meaning of happiness, Alzheimer's disease and the sense of being human, Ageing and decay, and conceptions of mortality.
A weekly theme-based approach to learning will be used, with themes from the perspectives of Biomedicine, Art, Philosophy among others and the unit will be taught by staff from different disciplines across Monash. The unit aims to be very strongly research-centred to allow students to develop an evidence-based attitude to health and illness in particular, and to life in general. The evidence-based multi-disciplinary approach will allow students to develop the broadest possible perspective and understanding of human concepts, attitudes and responses to health, well-being and illness. They will also help instill attitudes and skills critical to involvement in transforming local and international communities.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  • describe the impact of illness on the daily lives of those who are afflicted directly and indirectly by that illness
  • describe the societal conceptions of disease/illness in general and of the specific condition under study, in philosophy, literature and art
  • explain the epidemiological characteristics of the illness under study
  • describe the behavioural consequences of the illness under study
  • describe the medical basis of the illness under study, including the physiology, pharmacology and molecular biology of the condition
  • describe the therapeutic treatments and public health considerations of the illness under study
  • critically analyze research articles across a broad spectrum of disciplines related to illness and well-being
  • present data and ideas to a broad audience via a journal club or lecture style presentation
  • work constructively in a small group/team
  • develop a cogent and coherent writing style and an ability to demonstrate a reasoned understanding of the subject content through a written essay on a broad theme focused on one of the cases under study.
  • learn how to design and present web-based information in a manner easily accessible to the general public but also to develop a structure that allows for depth of information to be delivered

Assessment

Journal club presentations (group work): 20%; Lecture style presentations (group work): 25%; Design portfolio for a website (group work): 25%; Essay (individual work): 30%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

4 hours of workshops, 2 hours of student led research centred activities per week and 2 hours of journal club presentations per week. An additional 6 hours of private study is recommended.


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Monash Passport categoryDepth (Enhance Program)
OfferedCaulfield Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Bradley Crammond

Synopsis

There is no issue of greater importance today than that of promoting global development. Contemporary global health challenges are closely related to problems of development. Consequently, global health solutions require interdisciplinary perspectives and intersectoral collaboration across health and development. In this Unit, developed in collaboration with Oxfam Australia as part of the Oxfam/Monash Partnership, students will identify how, where and why global and transnational issues impact on people's health. They will consider why multidisciplinary approaches to research, policy and practice are so important and why evidence based policy and practice are required to address such complex health challenges. Working in groups to address a series of case studies, students will investigate some of the big questions of global health and development, involving poverty reduction and equality of access to health. For the first time, in 2014 between 3 and 5 students will have the opportunity to complete a semester-long internship at Oxfam Australia.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit you will be able to:

  1. Critically discuss development of, and progress towards, the Millennium Development Goals
  2. Describe how various disciplines and sectors contribute to the potential realization of those goals as exemplified in both small and large scale development projects
  3. Identify characteristics of effective project work undertaken by government and non-government organisations related to health, wellbeing and development in various contexts
  4. Examine evidence that supports applied policy making and practice in response to inter-related local, transnational and global challenges to health and wellbeing
  5. Reflect on the factors that influence your experience of working in a multidisciplinary team, including requisite knowledge and skills development.

Fieldwork

Some lectures may be conducted at Oxfam Australia to accommodate guest lecturers.

Assessment

Hurdle requirement: Students are required to attend 80% of tutorials
Literature review - 40%: 2000 words
Syndicate (Group) Presentation - 20%
Case evaluation - 40%: 2000 words (for the students completing the internship the case evaluation will be developed from their work at Oxfam)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

3 contact hours per week plus 9 hours per week private study.


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Virginia Plummer

Synopsis

NEH3001 is the second of two units offered in the Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Emergency Health related to interprofessional teams. The underpinning framework of this unit and NEH2002 Interprofessional healthcare Teams 1 are based on the 'Interprofessional capability Framework" developed by the combined Universities Interprofessional Learning Unit, in Sheffield, UK. The guidelines generated from this framework relate to practice-based learning and fall within four conceptual domains: Knowledge in Practice, Ethical Practice, Interprofessional Working and Reflection.

Outcomes

At the completion of this unit students will be able to:

Theme 1: Knowledge in Practice

  1. describe team structures and effective team functioning through knowledge of group dynamics and professional roles of all team members for complex contemporary case scenarios:

Theme II: Ethical Practice

  1. demonstrate an ability to understand and respect patients' cultures, values and belief systems;

Theme III: Interprofessional Working

  1. produce an example of integrated assessment and plan of care in partnership with the patient and responsive to the needs of health care service requirements;
  2. demonstrate effective communication skills in the context of patient focused care;

Theme IV: Reflection

  1. describe problem solving approaches and evidence based practice to identify and anticipate change in interprofessional team roles for complex contemporary case scenarios;
  2. show evidence of reflective processes associated with the management of complex case scenarios.

Assessment

Written reports on case-based team learning exercises: 40%
Self, peer and tutor assessments of group work and simulated team exercises: 30%
Assignment: 30%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

12 hours per week including contact time and private study, averaged over the 12 week semester - a total of 156 hours.

Prerequisites

NEH2002


12 points, SCA Band 1, 0.250 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)L. Walker

Synopsis

This clinical unit focuses on the preparation of the student for the transition to interprofessional practice as a multi-skilled health professional. The unit will examine the management of self and others, organizational structures within healthcare practice, evaluation of leadership teamwork, risk management and multidisciplinary decision making. Students will participate in a range of learning experiences designed to enhance their appreciation of health professionals' roles and teamwork skills. Specific clinical contexts of learning will be acute care emergencies, mental health emergencies and disaster management.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the students will be able to:

  1. demonstrate the ability to engage in multi-skilled interprofessional roles in multidisciplinary team environments
  2. appraise the contribution of leadership, management, teamwork and interdisciplinary collaboration in the provision of quality emergency care
  3. engage in appropriate interactions within the multidisciplinary health care team that promote and support patient participation and autonomy
  4. analyse a range of problem solving and time management strategies that enhance the organization of clinical workload whilst engaged in interprofessional practice
  5. incorporate and evaluate culturally relevant and age specific interventions for clients across the lifespan
  6. apply the principles of adult learning to identify their specific learning needs
  7. reflect critically on their own actions and on the nature of interprofessional practice in relation to the management of clients' health situations; practice with increasing independence at a beginning registered nurse level in accordance with the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMC) competencies.

Assessment

Written assignment: 60%
Reflective journal (2000 words): 40%
Nursing Clinical assessment: Pass/Fail
Paramedic clinical skills logbook: Pass/Fail

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Lectures and laboratory sessions will be conducted on two full study days to facilitate clinical placements throughout the semester.

This unit involves two clinical placements

  1. Four week nursing clinical placement in a hospital emergency department
  2. Approximately 80 hours paramedic clinical placements in a range of paramedic settings

Prerequisites


6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)L. Walker

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the student's ability to provide health care in community based emergency health and hospital settings. It builds on the model of clinical competence and the context of clinical practice commenced in previous years of this course. It provides context to support the clinical theory unit concurrently undertaken in this semester, BEH3032. Supervised clinical experience is undertaken over 2 weeks in ambulance and community based health settings. Hospital experience involves 2 weeks in hospital critical care areas, including coronary care unit, with an ICU orientation, operating theatre for airway care and fluid management and recovery, and an emergency department.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, the student should be able to:

  1. demonstrate an ability to review his/her own clinical experience and arrange suitable learning experiences to maintain learning needs as a result of the varying clinical opportunities while on placement
  2. demonstrate progress in the development of clinical, professional and leadership capabilities as a beginning health care provider
  3. describe legal frameworks and statutory and regulatory requirements of the professions that make up the health care team
  4. identify their role in team structures and contribute to effective team functioning through knowledge of group dynamics and professional roles of all team members
  5. apply an understanding of duty of care within a prevailing legal and ethical framework
  6. participate in an integrated approach to service delivery that is focused on the needs of the patient
  7. demonstrate an ability to respond to health emergencies, to assimilate information quickly and communicate it clearly and unambiguously to other members of the health care team
  8. demonstrate an ability to provide advanced life support under supervision
  9. demonstrate a culturally sensitive approach to the recognition and management of the reactions of patients and family to acute illness or injury
  10. describe the operational setting for critical care units in hospitals, ambulance services and retrieval services and the role of paramedics and nurses in facilitating continuity of care.

Assessment

Reflective Practice Assignment: 55%
Inter-professional Case Reviews: 45%
Clinical Practice Portfolio: Pass/Fail.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

The equivalent of 4 weeks full time supervised clinical placement - a total of 152 hours.

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Enrolment in the Bachelor of Emergency Health (3892) and BEH3032


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
Clayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Katrina Recoche (Peninsula), TBA (Berwick), Louisa Lam (Clayton)

Synopsis

Health professionals need to be able to communicate effectively with patients and their families, and with colleagues in the health care team. They also need to communicate with a wider scholarly community in order to implement evidence-based approaches in their practice and contribute to research evidence to advance the nursing knowledge base. These instances of communication require that professionals engage in a process of lifelong learning facilitated by reflection and critical thinking and by independent learning skills.

The aim of this unit is to enable students to develop as independent learners and competent communicators in four areas:

  • Communication with self
  • Communication with researchers
  • Communication with patients and their families
  • Communication with peers and other health professionals.

This unit explores the knowledge and skills needed to communicate effectively in each of these four areas as well as the way in which these areas interact with one another.

Following a brief introduction to the concepts of research and the nature of research evidence, this unit covers the essential elements of reflective practice and critical thinking, academic and information literacies, developmental psychology and oral and written communication including electronic patient records and telehealth,. Effective listening, body language, professional and therapeutic relationships, anger management, coping and conflict resolution are also explored.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. Explain the modes of communication employed by health practitioners in professional relationships as well as the key issues and strategies that must be considered in each.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic psychological processes related to human behaviour.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of the importance of evidence-based practice in the provision of safe, effective, holistic health care as well as the role of practise in enhancing the evidence base available.
  4. Effectively use a broad range of resources, including literature, information technologies and peers, to enhance scholarship and development as a professional.
  5. Demonstrate competency in academic skills at a beginning level.
  6. Apply, at a beginning level, critical thinking and reflection in the development of self as an independent learner and a future health professional.

Assessment

Individual electronic portfolio including a range of tasks:
Structured writing task: 15%
Essay: 30%
Reading and reflective activities: 45%
Integration of portfolio: 10%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

One

  1. hour lecture per week supported with two
  2. hour of tutorials and one
  3. hour of online guided learning activities per week for twelve
  4. weeks and 96 hours of private study over the semester. This unit applies to the following area(s) of study.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course code 0727 or 3562 or 3892 or 4506 or 4514


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedGippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Pamela Wood (Gippsland)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the Australian health care system, social determinants of health and the burden of disease experienced by individuals and groups differentially located in Australian society. The unit will explore societal values and the ethical dimensions of health care including access, equity, autonomy, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence. Students will also investigate the evolving role and place of nursing in the health care system and reflect on how the profession is likely to further evolve globally in the twenty first century.

Outcomes

  1. Discuss the evolution of the Australian health care system and the responses to emerging health issues
  2. Discuss the social determinants of health and their impact on Australians
  3. Critically examine the current health priorities, choices and cost implications of the Australian health care system
  4. Discuss the application of ethical principles to contemporary health care including access, equity, autonomy, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence
  5. Outline the evolution of the profession of nursing globally and in Australia
  6. Explain the role of nurses in facilitating equitable health care in a contemporary society

Assessment

Written assignment (2500-3000 words): 40%;
Group Work: 20%;
1x 2hr examination: 40%

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Attend lecture 2 hours and tutorial 2 hours/ week over 12 weeks and 9 hours of self directed study/week


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Dr Joy Lyneham (Peninsula)

Synopsis

This unit introduces the student to the concept of culture from a sociological perspective. Social determinants of health, supported by epidemiological evidence, will be explored taking into account the influence of gender, family, and ethnicity on health outcomes. The concept of values and ethical principles within healthcare communities will be introduced. Using critical thinking processes students will evaluate the influence that the 'socialisation of nursing' phenomena has on the defining characteristics of the Australian nursing workforce culture. The forces of globalisation on healthcare in the future and the nursing profession will be discussed.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. discuss the demographics of the Australian population from an epidemiological perspective
  2. appreciate the influence aging, gender and ethnicity exert on social determinants of health
  3. demonstrate the ability to appraise social and ethical wellbeing within the context of equity and cultural safety
  4. describe the role of the nurse as a member of the multidisciplinary team in the health service industry
  5. discuss the influence that globalization will effect on nursing workforce culture
  6. describe the concepts of wellness and illness as they are applied to the community, individuals and the Australian health care system
  7. discuss the role of community, culture and religion in influencing health care practice
  8. conceptualize values as the foundation of health ethics
  9. discuss the judgment and application of ethical principles to ethical issues in health care.

Assessment

Written Assignment (2500 words): 40%
Three (3) online, short answer, quizzes: 60% (20% per quiz)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Workload requirement: This unit will be offered as on campus flexible delivery mode consisting of three (3) hours lectures per week supported with one (1) hour of online guided learning activities per week for 12 weeks.


6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
Peninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Grace Stankiewicz (Peninsula), TBA (Clayton)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the beginning knowledge and skills of the professional nurse. The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMC) competency standards for the registered nurse are utilised as a framework to guide students in relation to person-centred care, patient safety, cultural and contextual competence and developing practice.
This unit includes the theoretical and practical foundations of clinical practice and processes in the clinical environment. In this unit you learn how to individualise care and undertake basic clinical skills that are fundamental in the care of individuals and groups. It is here you begin to explore the art and science that underpins the practice of a professional registered nurse.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

  1. Describe the concepts of health using a person-centred approach;
  2. Identify and discuss the biomedical, psychological, cultural and social aspects of healthcare;
  3. Discuss strategies to identify and evaluate the health needs of individuals and populations;
  4. Demonstrate accurate collection and recording of data for health histories for individuals, groups and communities;
  5. Demonstrate the knowledge and principles underpinning health assessment within varied contexts of care;
  6. Use an evidence-based approach to perform selected basic care skills in simulated and clinical environments while demonstrating an ability to maintain patient safety;
  7. Describe the role of the nurse/midwife in supporting the activities of daily living for patients and clients;
  8. Demonstrate professional behaviours and communication guided by the ANMC competency standards for professional practice;

Fieldwork

Clinical placement one (1) week (40 hours)

Assessment

Written assignment (2,000 words) 40%
Written examination 60%
Satisfactory clinical placement report.
To pass this unit the student must pass the examination and the clinical placement.

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

Lectures two

  • hours per week, Laboratory two
  • hours per week, Guided self-directed learning one

      (1) hour per week,

  • Co-requisites

    Must be enrolled in course code 0727 or 2552 or 3562 or 3892 or 4514

    Prohibitions


    6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedNot offered in 2014
    Coordinator(s)Ms Katrina Recoche

    Synopsis

    This unit will provide students with an enhanced understanding of the role culture plays in the lives of people from different backgrounds, the role of culture on health beliefs and the implications for health professionals. The unit will explore cultural safety and cultural responsiveness/cultural competency using the NH&MRC National Guidelines for Cultural Competence in Health as a framework. Students will be provided with the opportunity to explore their own values and beliefs and contrast these with the values and beliefs of others in the community.
    The unit will use various community-based clinical and social issues as a vehicle to enable students to engage with and develop skills in applying the principles of cultural responsiveness/cultural competency in health care delivery, in the setting of our diverse multi-cultural and Indigenous communities. This unit will underpin the 'Cultural Responsiveness/ Cultural Competency' theme in the respective courses which will be enhanced throughout subsequent units.

    Outcomes

    • Define the notion of 'culture' and how it manifests in society
    • Identify own personal values and beliefs related to health beliefs and contrast these with the values and beliefs of others in the community

    OR

    • Identify and reflect upon your own cultural knowledge and perspectives, and examine new ways of seeing, valuing and understanding with regard to multi-cultural and Indigenous health practice
    • Discuss the terms health status and culture
    • Describe the evolution of cultural awareness with regard to prevailing theories and models
    • Discuss the terms cultural responsiveness/cultural competency and safety
    • Outline the main points underpinning the NH&MRC National Guidelines for Cultural Competency in Health and the NHMRC Guidelines for Ethical Research in Indigenous health
    • Demonstrate the communication skills and attitudes required of health professionals in providing culturally safe health care for multicultural and Indigenous Australians
    • Apply the principles of cultural safety to achieve optimal outcomes for particular cultural groups
    • Examine and discuss a variety of explanations for Indigenous health and ill-health.

    Assessment

    Quiz, 30 minute, 10%.
    Workbook, 2,000 words, 40%
    Exam, 2 hour, 40%
    Tutorial attendance and participation 10%

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    24 Lecture Hours, 12 tutorial hours or online learning activities, 36 hours directed reading activities, 80 hours student directed.


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)Catherine Chung (Gippsland)

    Synopsis

    This unit introduces students to the fundamentals of nursing care for individuals and communities by introducing concepts, processes and skills required for nursing practice Concepts introduced include body mechanics, pain and comfort, the collection of health and nutritional profiles and issues of growth and development across the individual's lifespan. It aims to introduce students to complementary therapies and the notion of healthy lifestyles for the older and younger person. The unit includes theoretical and practical information about nursing skills, concepts and processes in a clinical practice component.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

    1. describe the concept of health from biomedical and psychological perspective
    2. begin to evaluate the concept of health needs or challenges for the normal individual or group over the lifespan
    3. perform selected basic care skills in a simulated environment using evidence-based approach
    4. demonstrate knowledge and skills for the assessment of health and development of individuals over the lifespan
    5. accurately collect and record data for health profiles and/or health histories for either individuals, groups or communities
    6. demonstrate a beginning understanding of the theories and the effects of pain; and
    7. demonstrate an ability to maintain safe body mechanics and comfort for clients/patients.

    Assessment

    Written examination: 50%. Students must pass this examination to pass the unit
    Clinical fieldwork: 50%
    Practical skills examination: pass/fail. Students must pass this examination to pass the unit
    Students must attend 90% of all scheduled laboratories - refer to school guidelines for details

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    12 weeks x 2 hours lectures, 12 weeks x 2 hours laboratories, 8 hours student directed learning activities, 96 hours of clinical placement.

    Co-requisites

    Only available to students enrolled in: Bachelor of Nursing Practice, Bachelor of Nursing Practice/ Bachelor of Midwifery, Bachelor of Nursing (Community Health)


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBerwick Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)Louisa Lam (Clayton), Joanne Stewart (Peninsula), Kelli Innes (Berwick)

    Synopsis

    This unit examines fundamental knowledge and skills in preparation for the care of individuals. Emphasis is placed on systematic health assessment and the development and evaluation of appropriate person-centred care, incorporating the legal and ethical dimensions of care. The clinical practise experience undertaken in this unit is an integral component of the development of the nurse/midwife and concentrates on the practical application of theoretical principles explored in this unit.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of therapeutic communication within the interdisciplinary health care team to enhance the personal interaction involved in assessment;
    2. Accurately demonstrate comprehensive health and physical assessment skills in simulated and clinical practice environments;
    3. Plan, implement and evaluate nursing care using a person-centred approach cognisant of each individual's autonomy, self esteem and dignity;
    4. Demonstrate the ability to integrate scientific knowledge with nursing practice;
    5. Demonstrate understanding of the basic principles of medication management related to patient safety;
    6. Demonstrate professional and personal accountability as a novice practitioner when providing nursing care;
    7. Discuss the legal and ethical principles surrounding safe care delivery to individuals and the implications for nursing/midwifery care;
    8. Identify the core principles of palliative care and the resources available for people with life limiting illness; and,
    9. critically reflect on own values about health, illness, dying and how death affects professional responses and interactions with others.

    Fieldwork

    Clinical placement two (2) weeks, (80 hours)

    Assessment

    Written assignment (2,000 words) 40%
    Examination 60%,
    Clinical placement Pass/Fail
    Clinical skills examination Pass/Fail
    Drug Calculation and mastery Pass/Fail (Hurdle)

    Students must pass the clinical placement, clinical skills assessments and calculation hurdle to pass this unit.

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Lectures two

  • hours per week, Laboratory two
  • hours per week, Guided self-directed learning one

      (1) hour per week,

  • Prerequisites

    Co-requisites


    Must be enrolled in course code 0727 or 2552 or 3562 or 3892 or 4506 or 4514


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedClayton First semester 2014 (Day)
    Peninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)Suzanne Willey (Peninsula), Georgina Willets (Clayton)

    Synopsis

    Leadership is fundamental to the nature of nursing and midwifery; in the formation of safe practice, interdisciplinary relationships, education, research and health care delivery.
    In this unit, nursing leadership is explored by examining the historical nature of leadership in nursing. The social construct of leadership will be investigated in the context of interpersonal organisational health care relationships and clinical practice. A major feature of the unit is an exploration of the professional values and ethics that form the basis of decision making in health care systems and nursing practice.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the contexts in which health care is provided in Australia including primary care, acute care, sub acute care and supportive care;
    2. Discuss the philosophical and ethical values that underpin nursing as a profession;
    3. Describe the attributes and roles of leaders and leaders in nursing;
    4. Conceptualise the relationship between nursing, leadership and teamwork;
    5. Analyse values as the foundation of health care ethics;
    6. Explain the principles underpinning standards and codes of practice related to the profession;
    7. Discuss the role of community, culture and religion in influencing health care practice; and,
    8. Debate the values underpinning difference pertaining to gender, cultural and disability.

    Assessment

    Tutorial attendance and participation 10%
    Student-led discussion 50%
    Final Examination (2 hours) (40%)

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Lectures two

  • hours per week, Tutorials two
  • hours per fortnight, Guided self-directed learning one

      (1) hour per week

  • Co-requisites

    Only available to students enrolled in: Bachelor of Nursing or Diploma of Tertiary Studies


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBairnsdale First semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)TBA (Gippsland)

    Synopsis

    The aim of this unit is to enable students to develop tertiary study skills and knowledge that will assist them to become a scholar of nursing. Particular attention will be given to the development of communication, literacy, information technology and critical thinking and clinical decision making skills. The significance of research to the development of a distinct, specialised body of knowledge will be emphasised. The research process will be introduced as a basis for the development of skills in the evaluation and application of research outcomes in nursing practice. The contribution of scholarship to the evolution of nursing as a professional discipline will be explored in this unit.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit students are expected to be able to:

    1. Discuss the significance of scholarship to the status of nursing as a professional discipline;
    2. Develop competency in tertiary study skills;
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in professional written and verbal communication;
    4. Describe research methodologies used in the investigation of problems of significance to nursing and midwifery;
    5. Discuss the concept of evidence-based practice in relation to the provision of safe, effective, holistic nursing care;
    6. Examine nursing theory, critical thinking and reflection in the context of the development of nursing knowledge;
    7. Effectively use a broad range of resources including literature and information technologies to enhance critical and clinical decision-making skills.

    Assessment

    Tutorial presentation: 20%
    Written Assignment: 40%
    Exam: 40%

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    4 hours per week (lecture and tutorial)


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBairnsdale Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Berwick Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Clayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)TBA (Berwick),TBA (Gippsland) and Dr.Debra Griffiths (Peninsula)

    Synopsis

    The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the legal system including the processes and institutions that impact on professional practice. Students will identify the law as it relates to the delivery of health services including professional standards and regulation, complaint mechanisms and relevant legal forums including the coroner's court. Students will be encouraged to explore the health professional's relationship and obligations owed to patients, patient families and professional colleagues in the various health care environments.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit students are expected to be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of common law and statute law pertinent to health professional practice;
    2. Explain why the study of health law is an essential aspect of professional practice;
    3. Demonstrate an awareness of the legal implications of actions taken in professional practice;
    4. Analyse the legal implications of the health care professional's relationship with clients, their families and other health care providers;
    5. Identify strategies, which may provide assistance in resolving legal issues that arise in the various domains of the health professional; and
    6. Discuss the significance of registration of professionals in the health care environment; and
    7. Critically reflect on own values about health illness, dying and death affects professional responses and interactions with others

    Assessment

    Essay (3000 words) 45%
    Written exam (2hrs) 45%
    2 x online quizzes (15 mins each) 5% each

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Lectures two (2) hours per week, Tutorial one (1) hour per week

    Co-requisites

    Only available to students enrolled in: 0727 Bachelor of Nursing or 2552 Diploma of Tertiary Studies or 3445 Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or 3892 Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or 3953 Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery or 3963 Bachelor of Nursing Practice
    4506 Bachelor of Nursing (Community Health) or 4514 Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Midwifery


    12 points, SCA Band 1, 0.250 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedGippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)Catherine Chung (Peninsula)

    Synopsis

    This unit extends the concepts of health, wellness and evidence-based nursing and midwifery practice introduced in previous units. Students will use knowledge derived from social and biological sciences to inform the development of skills in health assessment. An introduction to concepts and skills fundamental to the practice of nursing will enable students to undertake nursing care that is culturally and developmentally contemporaneous. As communication is the cornerstone of effective assessment and therapeutic interventions, interpersonal skills are emphasized in this unit.

    Outcomes

    On the completion of this unit, students are expected to be able to:

    1. Discuss the importance of an evidence base for contemporary nursing and midwifery practice;
    2. Apply knowledge from physical, psychological, social and environmental sciences in the provision of quality care across a range of clinical settings;
    3. Utilise therapeutic communication and interaction principles in the assessment and care of patients/clients;
    4. Undertake holistic assessment of patients/clients across the lifespan in simulated and practice environments;
    5. Employ critical and clinical decision making skills in planning, implementing and evaluating evidence-based nursing interventions to promote the health of patients/clients;
    6. Promote the independence, self-esteem and dignity of patients/clients using strategies appropriate for their sociodemographic/cultural background and developmental stage;
    7. Practice in accordance with ANMC Competencies for the Registered Nurse and other relevant professional standards.

    Assessment

    Assignment: 30%; Case study: 20%; Examination: 50%; Practical examination (e.g. OSCE): Pass/Fail; Clinical practicum: Pass/Fail.
    Students must successfully complete both the theoretical and practical components in order to pass this unit.

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    6 hours on-campus, 1 hour on-line learning per week plus 120 hours clinical practicum

    Prerequisites

    Students enrolled in 2552 must have passed: ATS1369 and NUR1101, Otherwise must have passed NUR1101, NUR1201

    Prohibitions


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)Meredith McIntyre

    Synopsis

    This unit aims to explore the connection between the science of population health, the sociology pertaining to the life lived and health outcomes of individuals and populations. In particular, the implications these factors have for health care practice will be examined. current research evidence incorporating epidemiology of health and the social determinants of health, supported by the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMC) National Competency Standards for the Registered Nurse and for the Midwife and the School of Nursing and Midwifery graduate

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit, it is expected that students will be able to:

    1. Discuss the impact of population health demographics, including on Indigenous Australians, refugee and other vulnerable groups;
    2. Interpret the incidence, prevalence and clinical relevance of population health information presented in health research publications;
    3. Describe the social determinants of health and discuss their impact on the health of diverse population groups and their utilisation of clinical services;
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of cultural sensitivity, cultural safety and cultural competence as explained in the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) guidelines; and
    5. Apply the principles of 'person-centeredness', leadership and cultural competence to achieve optimal health outcomes across a range of population groups and diverse clinical settings

    Assessment

    Group Presentation (20 minutes) and Written Synopsis (2,000 words) (30%)
    Online Quiz (20 minutes) (10%)
    Written Examination (2 hours) (60%)

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Lectures two (2) hours per week, Tutorials one

    1. hour per week, Guided work two
    2. hours per week

    Co-requisites

    Must be enrolled in course code 0727 or 3892 or 4514


    12 points, SCA Band 1, 0.250 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBairnsdale First semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)Ms Ainsley James (Gippsland), Md.Nadim Rahman(Peninsula)

    Synopsis

    This unit introduces the concepts of medical and surgical nursing across the lifespan along with an introduction to pharmacology. A case based approach is used to facilitate the integration and application of pharmacological principles and associated drug groups underpinned by human pathophysiology related to the body system under review. Systems studied include respiratory, cardiovascular and endocrine. Pain management and wound assessment and integrity, introduced in first year, are explored at an increasingly complex level. The clinical practicum component provides opportunities to develop competency to a year two (2) level in a range of skills learnt in the simulated laboratory environment

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

    1. demonstrate a knowledge of the pathophysiological changes associated with respiratory, cardiovascular and endocrine dysfunction, and their application to the nursing care of clients in medical/surgical settings;
    2. discuss the basic principles of pharmacology, therapeutic drug administration and monitoring as they relate to nursing;
    3. analyse the problems associated with drug administration, including drug interactions and the use of drugs across the life-span;
    4. describe the legal and professional nursing requirements associated with quality use of medications including safe drug administration, storage and handling;
    5. identify and apply appropriate evidence based nursing interventions when caring for clients with compromised wound integrity, and pain management;
    6. begin to develop the ability to plan culturally relevant and age specific nursing interventions for acutely ill clients;
    7. identify ethical issues relevant to the nursing care of clients with an alteration in health status;
    8. demonstrate safe clinical practice in an acute care setting based on the integration of theoretical principles and practical skills;
    9. provide person centred care according to relevant nursing care principles, to clients under the supervision of registered nursing staff and the clinical teacher;
    10. conduct and document comprehensive assessments of the needs of clients utilising an appropriate assessment tool, and
    11. begin to evaluate self-performance in terms of the delivery of quality nursing care.

    Fieldwork

    Clinical Placement 3 weeks (120 hours)

    Assessment

    Examination: 60%
    Case study: 30%
    Quizzes: 10%
    Skill assessment: Pass/Fail Clinical placement assessment, 100% mastery Calculation hurdle. Students must achieve a pass in the examination,the skill assessment and the clinical placement to pass the unit.
    Students must attend 100% of all scheduled laboratories, unless a medical certificate is provided - refer to school's clinical policy for details.

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Five (5) hours lectures per week supported by 2 hours laboratory, 1 hour of tutorial with two (2) hours of online guided learning activities per week plus three (3) weeks of clinical placement at five(5) days/week (based on an 8 hour day/40 hour week).

    Prerequisites

    Must have passed an BMA1912 AND Must have passed an one of NUR1102 or NUR1203

    Co-requisites

    Only available to students enrolled in: Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Nursing/ Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic), Bachelor of Nursing Practice, Bachelor of Nursing Practice/Bachelor of Midwifery or Bachelor of Nursing Community Health.


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
    Clayton First semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
    Peninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
    Bairnsdale Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)TBA (Berwick), Dr Sonia Allen (Gippsland), Ms Lin Zhao (Peninsula), TBA (Clayton)

    Synopsis

    This unit builds upon the epidemiology of aging populations, pandemics, and sociology introduced in the first year of the course. The context of health services on determining emerging practice for health professionals is explored. Students are introduced to issues of management in healthcare, care planning, discharge planning and global health care considerations. Issues with reference to: patients' rights, ethical theories and principles, and ethical reasoning are explored as applied to clinical situations where, moral obligation, moral responsibility, moral distress and ethical dilemmas are likely to arise. Critical thinking skills will be developed.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit the student will be able to:

    1. discuss the Australian Healthcare context and the influences driving change
    2. describe the challenges faced by state and federal government related to large scale emergencies requiring immediate medical care
    3. demonstrate an understanding of health management as it applies to risk management in clinical practice
    4. apply principles of health management to the clinical practice
    5. discuss the application of ethical principles to clinical issues related to privacy, consent and advocacy, veracity, trust, limits of care and moral responsibility
    6. describe the ethical issues that arise in relation to commencing and terminating nurse-patient relationships
    7. compare and contrast the various theoretical approaches to ethical reasoning in the context of ethical and clinical decision making.

    Assessment

    Written assignment (3000 words): 50%
    On-line quiz (20 minutes): 20%
    Group presentation (1,000 words): 30%

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Three (3) hours lectures per week supported with one (1) hour of online guided learning activities per week for 10 weeks.

    Co-requisites

    Only available to students enrolled in: 0727 Bachelor of Nursing or 3953 Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery or 3963 Bachelor of Nursing Practice or 4506 Bachelor of Nursing (Community Health) or 4514 Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Midwifery


    12 points, SCA Band 1, 0.250 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBairnsdale Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)TBA (Berwick), Ms Ainsley James (Gippsland), Nadim Radim (Peninsula)

    Synopsis

    This unit explores the integration and application of pharmacological principles and associated drug groups underpinned by human pathophysiology related to the body system under review. The interrelationship and symptom specific of the following systems, neurological, musculoskeletal, renal, vascular and haematological and gender issues related to health are studied. Pain management and wound integrity studied in NUR2002 - Nursing practice in Context 1, are explored at an increasing complex level. The clinical practicum component of this unit provides the student the opportunity to develop competency to a year two (2) level in a range of skills learnt in the simulated laboratory environment.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

    1. demonstrate a knowledge of the pathophysiological changes associated with gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, neurological, renal, vascular and hematological dysfunction and gender issues, and their application to the nursing care of clients in medical/surgical settings;
    2. demonstrate the basic principles of pharmacology, therapeutic drug administration and monitoring as they relate to nursing practice;
    3. analyse the problems associated with drug administration, including drug interactions and the use of drugs across the life-span;
    4. understand the nursing application of diagnostic, therapeutic and preventative techniques associated with caring for a client with a body system health breakdown;
    5. plan culturally relevant and age specific nursing interventions for acutely ill clients across the lifespan;
    6. identify and apply appropriate evidence based nursing interventions when caring for clients with compromised wound integrity, and pain management;
    7. critically discuss ethical issues relevant to the nursing care of clients with an alteration in health status;
    8. demonstrate safe, evidenced based clinical practice in an acute care setting based on the integration of theoretical principles and practical skills;
    9. provide person centred care according to relevant nursing care principles, to clients under the supervision of registered nursing staff and the clinical teacher;
    10. conduct and document comprehensive assessments of the needs of clients utilising an appropriate assessment tool, and
    11. evaluate self-performance in terms of the delivery of quality nursing care

    Fieldwork

    Clinical Placement 2 weeks (80 hours)

    Assessment

    Examination: 60%
    Case study: 30%
    Quizzes: 10%
    Skill assessment: Pass/Fail Clinical placement assessment, 100% mastery Calculation hurdle. Students must achieve a pass in the examination, the skill assessment and the clinical placement to pass the unit.
    Students must attend 100% of all scheduled laboratories unless a medical certificate can be provided- refer to school's clinical policy for details.

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Five

  • hours lectures per week supported by two
  • hours laboratory, one

    1. hour of tutorial with two
    2. hours of online guided learning activities per week. Two
    3. weeks of clinical placement at five
    4. days/week (based on an 8 hour day/40 hour week) and private study over the 12 week semester - a total of 312 hours.

  • Prerequisites

    Must have passed NUR2002, BMA1901 and BMA1912

    Co-requisites

    Only available to students enrolled in: Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic), Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery or Bachelor of Nursing Practice


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedClayton Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Peninsula Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)Ms Suzanne Willey (Peninsula)

    Synopsis

    This elective unit provides students with an introduction to maternity and paediatric nursing.
    Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of the nurse in supporting care of women and their families throughout the childbearing process. Emphasis is on normal pregnancy and postpartum care of mother and baby.
    The unit also extends learning from core units around medical and surgical care and special needs of children.

    Outcomes

    1. Discuss roles and responsibilities of health professionals in the care of childbearing women, children and adolescents;
    2. Discuss physical, psychological changes and common complications in pregnancy;
    3. Outline key aspects of prenatal care;
    4. Describe the stages of labour;
    5. Describe assessments and care of mother and baby following birth;
    6. Identify common complications and their immediate management in the postpartum period;
    7. Describe characteristics and care of the normal newborn baby;
    8. Discuss common neonatal, paediatric and adolescent conditions and their management;
    9. Outline key periods in child and adolescent development;
    10. Describe common responses of children and adolescents to illness;
    11. Discuss the importance of family-centre care;
    12. Describe safe care of postnatal mothers, newborn babies, sick children and adolescents; and,
    13. Discuss legal and ethical issues impacting on the care of childbearing women and hospitalized children and adolescents.

    Assessment

    Two (2) x 2000 workbooks - each 2000 words (20% each)
    Examination worth - Two (2) hours (60%).
    Students must pass the examination to pass the unit

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Four (4) hours lecture/tutorial/laboratory

    Co-requisites

    Only available to students enrolled in: Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing Practice


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBairnsdale First semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland First semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)TBA (Gippsland)

    Synopsis

    Therapeutics plays a significant role in the prevention and management of disease. Nurses and midwives must have a comprehensive knowledge of the actions and effects of medications consumed by patients in their care to provide safe, competent and effective medication administration. Understanding drugs requires a strong foundation of pharmacologic principles to help establish the knowledge-base to underpin safe nursing practice. This unit examines fundamental knowledge and skills to promote the therapeutic application of drugs in the clinical setting and to enhance the ability to provide patient care and education.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit students will be expected to be able to:

    1. Explain drug terminology;
    2. Identify the characteristics and mechanisms of action of significant drug groups and related nursing considerations;
    3. Identify the indicators of adverse drug reactions;
    4. Identify appropriate administration considerations for significant drug groups;
    5. Outline therapeutic responses to drugs and related life span issues;
    6. Identify factors which determine the potency of drug responses;
    7. Review the impact of polypharmacy and develop nursing plans for patient care;
    8. Discuss factors and processes which contribute to medication errors;
    9. Apply nursing assessment principles to drug administration to promote quality patient care;
    10. Develop a clinical pharmacology care plan;
    11. Develop a drug education plan;
    12. Explore the use of complementary and alternative therapies in the health care setting and the implications for nursing care of the patient.

    Assessment

    Clinical drug education plan (2000 words):25%;
    Group assignment :25%; Exam (2 hours): 50%.
    Students must attend 90% of all scheduled laboratories/tutorials - refer to school clinical guidelines for details.

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    4 hours per week (lectures, tutorials, labs) x 9 weeks;
    1 hour per week on line guided learning x 9 weeks


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedPeninsula Second semester 2014 (Flexible)
    Coordinator(s)Katrina Recoche

    Synopsis

    An important component of our health system is the services provided for those living with terminal illness. The health needs of these individuals are diverse and often change over time. An interdisciplinary approach will be used to engage students in building fundamental knowledge and skill for the provision of palliative care in any setting. This unit aims to develop the abilities of health professionals and other graduates to care for persons with life limiting illness, by improving awareness of the principles and values underpinning palliative care, communication, clinical assessment and interventions and optimizing function in palliative care and coping with dying and bereavement. This unit is a prerequisite for NUR3007 'Clinical experience in the palliative approach'.

    Outcomes

    1. Communicate effectively in the context of individual responses to loss and grief, existential challenges, uncertainty and changing goals of care;
    2. Appreciate and respect to the diverse human and clinical responses of each individual throughout their illness trajectory;
    3. Understand the principles of assessment and management of clinical and supportive care needs; and,
    4. Reflect and evaluate their own professional and personal experiences and their cumulative impact on self and others.

    Assessment

    Comprehensive case study: 40%
    Essay: 40%
    Tutorial Participation: 20%

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Three 3 hour compulsory workshops in weeks 1,2 and 3 of the semester, followed by weekly 1 hour podcast lectures.

    Prerequisites

    Enrolment in 2nd or 3rd year of an undergraduate degree related to health sciences.


    6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBairnsdale Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Gippsland Second semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)John Field (Gippsland)

    Synopsis

    This unit provides the opportunity for the student to develop fundamental knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to the restoration and maintenance of optimal mental health. Students will be expected to assess people with mental health problems and to identify, prioritize and implement appropriate evidence based interventions. The guiding principles of the National Practice Standards for the Mental Health Workforce including: rights, responsibilities, safety and privacy, consumer and carer participation, awareness of diversity, early detection and intervention, ethical practice and professional responsibilities underpin the unit contents. Topics covered in this unit include: the mental health workforce, mental health and illness, psychiatric assessment, legal and ethical care, psychotropic medications, the mental health system, the consumer and carer movement, acute psychosis, mood disorders, peri-natal mental disorders, personality disorders and anxiety disorders.

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

    1. discuss the concepts of mental health and mental illness with reference to historical and contemporary classification systems
    2. demonstrate a knowledge of the Mental Health Act
    3. conduct a mental status assessment and a risk assessment
    4. describe the roles and functions of the members of the mental health workforce
    5. describe the aetiological factors, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of a range of mental disorders including anxiety disorders, personality disorders, mood disorders psychotic disorders and perinatal mental disorders
    6. apply the knowledge of these factors in the care of clients and families of clients with mental health problems
    7. demonstrate a knowledge of a range of psychotherapeutic interventions
    8. discuss ethical issues which pertain to mental health care
    9. communicate effectively with people who are experiencing disturbances of thoughts, feelings and behaviour
    10. demonstrate cultural sensitivity and safety in mental health practice.

    Fieldwork

    Two (2) weeks of clinical placement at five (5) days/week (based on an 8 hour day/40 hour week

    Assessment

    Written assignment: 30%
    On line quizzes: 10%
    Formal examination: 60%
    Clinical Assessment: Pass/fail
    100% attendance mandatory .
    Students must attend 100% of all scheduled tutorials - refer to school clinical guidelines for details.

    Chief examiner(s)

    Workload requirements

    Two (2) hours lecture per week
    Two (2) hr tutorial per week
    One (1) hour for self directed reading and quizzes per week
    Two (2) - five (5) hours of private study weekly
    Clinical placement - 80 hours

    Prerequisites

    Co-requisites

    Only available to students enrolled in: Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Nursing/ Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) Bachelor of Nursing Practice, Bachelor of Nursing Practice/Bachelor of Midwifery or Bachelor of Midwifery


    12 points, SCA Band 1, 0.250 EFTSL

    Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

    LevelUndergraduate
    FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
    Organisational UnitSchool of Nursing and Midwifery
    OfferedBerwick First semester 2014 (Day)
    Clayton First semester 2014 (Day)
    Peninsula First semester 2014 (Day)
    Coordinator(s)Noelleen Kiprillis (Berwick), Robyn Fairhall (Peninsula), TBA (Clayton)

    Synopsis

    This unit introduces concepts of medical and surgical nursing and pharmacology, across the lifespan. A case based approach is used to facilitate the integration and application of pharmacological principles and associated drug groups underpinned by human pathophysiology related to the body system under review. Systems studied include respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, renal and endocrine. The topics of pain management, wound assessment and clinical assessment skills introduced in year one will be further developed as each system is studied. Clinical simulation exercises will be utilised in laboratory sessions to develop and enhance the acquisition of clinical skills. The clinical practicum component provides opportunities to develop competency to a year two (2) level in a range of skills learnt in the simulated laboratory environment

    Outcomes

    On completion of this unit, it is expected that the student will be able to:

    1. demonstrate knowledge of pathophysiological changes associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, renal and endocrine dysfunction, and their application to the nursing care of patients in practice settings;
    2. des