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Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

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Monash University Handbook 2016 Undergraduate - Units

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Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Dr Paul Jennings

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit introduces population health, public health and primary health care principles to the analysis of community based emergency health (CBEH). Population health principles are applied to illness prevention and health promotion. The use of health datasets in population and public health is also discussed. The basis of science, knowledge and evidence is explored along with the principles and use of evidence-based practice in the CBEH setting. Students are encouraged to develop their capacity for enquiry, research, critical thought, critical appraisal and analysis through the semester. Information technology is used to access and interrogate the multitude of health datasets.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Outline the essential features of the Australian Healthcare System.
  2. Describe the essential features of population health, contemporary public health, and primary health care, and relate them to community-based emergency health care.
  3. Explain the concepts of science, knowledge and truth, scientific method, research, and evaluation.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the core elements of a scholarly approach to investigations.
  5. Develop the ability to use information technology to access resources relating to community-based emergency health care.
  6. Demonstrate critical appraisal of the literature related to aspects of emergency care practice.
  7. Outline the epidemiological approaches to community based emergency health using examples of contemporary emergency health issues.
  8. Develop an understanding and awareness of inequalities in the community and their impact on health status and for the provision of adequate community-based emergency health services.
  9. Describe the importance of clinical research and the role of the paramedic in research that informs clinical practice.
  10. Outline the principles of evidence-based practice in determining the evidence and transmitting theory to practice in the setting of CBEH.

Assessment

Examination (2 hours) (40%)
Portfolio (60%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3445.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Ms Chantal Perera

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit uses the framework of human development throughout the lifespan to identify health and, specifically, emergency health issues at various stages of the lifespan. Students will investigate the roles of paramedics and allied health professionals in assessing human development and maintaining health across the lifespan and will explore issues relating to death and grieving. Included in this unit will be clinical visits to selected agencies to provide clinical context to the theoretical background.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the physical, personal, psychological and social milestones of human development throughout the lifespan.
  2. Identify the social and cultural determinants that impact upon human development.
  3. Communicate effectively with individuals across the lifespan within an appropriate developmental framework.
  4. Identify common acute and chronic health issues that occur across the lifespan.
  5. Apply contemporary theories of development to specific health issues across the lifespan.
  6. Identify essential activities and information regarding health promotion to meet the needs of individuals across the lifespan.
  7. Summarise theoretical perspectives on grieving and loss.

Assessment

Written assignment (2,000 words) (25%)
Portfolio (30%)
Community placement portfolio (Pass / Fail)
Examination (2 hours) (45%)

To pass this unit the student must attend community placements AND successfully complete the community placement portfolio. 80% attendance at tutorials is required to pass this unit.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, small group exercises, and field trips.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3445.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Mr Peter Jurkovsky

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

Law, Ethics and Professionalism will provide Bachelor of Emergency Health students with a sound basis for their legal and ethical practice within a chosen profession. The unit is divided into three distinct themes which blend together to assist in their understanding of legal principles, the application of legal standards, assessment and application of ethical practices while analysing the overarching concepts of professionalism in a challenging and continually developing area of health practice.

The unit will offer a broad range of teaching and learning strategies to accommodate the variety of participants in a non-clinical setting with an emphasis in supporting students in these activities. A combination of a prescribed text written specifically for the discipline and referral articles that encompass a wider field of practice will be used in conjunction with lectures, tutorials, online discussion and research tasks. A particularly important area of activity within the unit will be applying the principles in contextualised scenarios that relate directly to paramedic practice to ensure students consider and reflect upon areas of their professional practice, beyond the purely clinical environment.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a requisite level of knowledge of the Australian legal system and its principles whilst also exhibiting an understanding of the requirements of the law in professional paramedic practice.
  2. Identify particularly important legislation, cases and legal concepts while applying their principles to professional paramedic practice.
  3. Identify the basis and application of the fundamental rights and responsibilities of all involved in pre-hospital care while assessing principles of personal autonomy, consent and refusal of treatment by discussing and analysing difficult facts scenarios within the health care paradigm.
  4. Discuss and analyse the significance of regulation and registration in paramedic practice while assessing the various ways in which registration authorities receive, consider and adjudicate on issues affecting professional health practice.
  5. Identify and assess the issues associated with surrogate and end of life decision making in health care generally while analysing the unique requirements in the pre-hospital environment.
  6. Assess and practically apply the requirements of accurate record keeping, confidentiality and mandatory reporting in health care generally and paramedic practice specifically.
  7. Identify and discuss the essential ethical and bioethical theories while applying them to the role of the paramedic.
  8. Accurately describe contemporary models of professionalism and their application to the role of the paramedic while practically applying the appropriate models in problem based scenarios.

Assessment

Research paper (50%)
Final examination (50%)

Workload requirements

The unit is structured around two, two-hour lectures and one one-hour tutorial each week (Weeks 2 - 11 inclusive). In addition to attending lectures and tutorials it is expected that students complete a minimum of 1 hour of personal study per one hour of contact time (approximately 10 hours per week) in order to satisfy the reading and assignment expectations.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3445.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Ms Jaime Wallis

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit builds on the foundation of the paramedic clinician and expands the roles expected of paramedics as clinicians. The unit will utilise a model of paramedic clinical competence as a framework to develop the foundations and skills of clinical approach, clinical problem solving, clinical decision-making, and scene management. The unit will develop scientific knowledge and understanding of selected concepts of disease/injury and require students to integrate this knowledge in the clinical laboratory and simulation settings. The unit uses a patient-centred safety focus and is designed to assist students to understand the scope of practice and clinical pathways available in community based emergency healthcare.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate and enhance the standardised clinical approach and assessment to patients in the community.
  2. Demonstrate the required standard in each of the core clinical skills of a physical examination in the pre-hospital setting.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to appropriately manage the unconscious patient and devise an appropriate clinical management plan for that individual.
  4. Identify the need for a thorough clinical assessment and examine triage pathways for specific patient presentation in the pre-hospital setting.
  5. Explore and identify the impact of evidence based practice that informs paramedic practice.
  6. Identify and describe facets of the pre-hospital work environment that can impact on the delivery of care to a patient and ambulance paramedics.

Assessment

Mid-semester test (1 hour) (20%)
Clinical portfolio (30%) (Hurdle)
Written exam (2 hours) (50%)
Objective Structured Clinical Examination (Pass / Fail)

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must complete the clinical portfolio at the pass grade AND pass the written examination. 80% attendance at tutorials is mandatory to pass this unit.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, practical small group exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

BEH1011.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

TBA

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units.

The unit covers commonly encountered chronic, acute, and life threatening respiratory-related clinical problems across the lifespan. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies. The scope of the unit includes the development of skills needed to provide general health care as well as care at an advanced life support level.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, pathology and clinical manifestations of acute and chronic respiratory conditions commonly encountered in paramedic practice across the lifespan.
  2. Locate and evaluate evidence that informs paramedic clinical practice guidelines used to care for patients with respiratory conditions.
  3. Demonstrate systematic patient assessment and formulation of a statement describing the individual's alteration in health status.
  4. Demonstrate the planning and implementation of care and accurately document and communicate the care provided.
  5. Demonstrate effective communication and collaboration with patients, families and other members of the multidisciplinary health care team.
  6. Evaluate the appropriateness and efficacy of care in relation to the special needs of patients across the lifespan and the needs of patients, family and carers from Indigenous and culturally diverse backgrounds.
  7. Relate the pharmacology of drugs used by paramedics for the management of respiratory conditions to drug indications and actions.
  8. Reflect on the diagnostic reasoning, clinical problem solving and clinical decision making processes that influence the care of patients with respiratory conditions in order to evaluate and justify management decisions and identify threats to patient safety.
  9. Describe the special features and trends in the Australian health system relating to prevention and management of respiratory conditions.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate professional behaviours and provide peer review within simulated learning environments.

Assessment

Mid-semester test (1 hour) (20%)
Clinical portfolio (30%)
Written examination (2 hours) (50%)
Case simulation (30 minutes) (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must pass the written examination AND pass the case simulation. 80% attendance at paramedic skills laboratories is mandatory to pass this unit.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

TBA

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Ms Terry-Ann Davies

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units. The unit addresses injury and injury prevention across the lifespan, with specific reference to commonly encountered acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions, injury. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies. The scope of the unit includes developing the skills needed to provide general health care as well as care at an advanced life support level.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health and pathology related to injuries and commonly encountered in paramedic practice.
  2. Describe criteria used to identify major trauma and demonstrate the application of pre-hospital trauma triage guidelines.
  3. Identify and evaluate evidence that informs paramedic clinical practice guidelines used to care for patients with injury.
  4. Relate the pharmacology of drugs and fluids used by paramedics for the management of injury to drug indications and actions.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to integrate the theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to the assessment and management of patients with injury in real time simulation including clinical problem solving and clinical decision taking, professionalism, safety, documentation, communication and teamwork.
  6. Demonstrate the management of patients, their carers and bystanders in situations of acute injury in a sociological and culturally sensitive context.

Assessment

End of semester written examination (2 hours) (40%)
Clinical portfolio or written assignment (2,000 words) (40%)
Mid-semester written examination (1 hour) (20%)
Scenario-based clinical examination (30 minutes) (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must pass the written examination AND pass the scenario-based clinical examination.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, practical simulation.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Assoc Prof Brett Williams

Offered

Peninsula

  • Summer semester A 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician. It will build on a model of paramedic clinical competence developed in prerequisite units and will provide the context to support the implementation of knowledge and skills necessary for effective patient care. Students will have the opportunity to practice and develop their clinical skills in the management of patients with acute health conditions through clinical placements with ambulance service providers and other health agencies. The unit will also place an emphasis on the insightfulness that is required to deliver quality patient care through a range of reflective tasks that challenge the student to consider their practice from a variety of alternative perspectives.

Outcomes

  1. Evaluate their clinical knowledge, and identify clinical learning opportunities that may improve their ability to communicate with and care for patients;
  2. Recognise their role in the community emergency health setting, and display appropriate professional and teamwork behaviours;
  3. Perform appropriate paramedic clinical tasks under supervision in the community emergency health setting;
  4. Apply relevant theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to the care of patients within the community emergency health setting;
  5. Work as an effective team member with paramedics and health care professionals to provide appropriate patient care.
  6. Reflect on their performance in the clinical setting to identify the adequacy of their judgements and the factors influencing clinical decision making.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 160 hours.

Assessment

Clinical skills logbook (Pass / Fail)
Reflective case reports (3 x 1,000 words each) (75%)
Discussion forums (5 x meaningful discussion post of at least 200 words each) (25%)

Hurdle: A pass grade must be achieved on all assessment tasks.

Workload requirements

The equivalent of 4 weeks full time supervised clinical placement - a total of 160 hours. The unit is conducted over the 'Summer A' semester so that the essential professional requirement of the supervised clinical practice can be met.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Mr Damien Dambrosi

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units. The unit covers commonly encountered chronic, acute, and life threatening cardiovascular problems across the lifespan. The unit will be both theory, and case based. It will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies. This will be supported by a significant theoretical component including pathophysiology and ECG interpretation. The scope of the unit includes the development of skills needed to provide general health care as well as care at an advanced life support level.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of acute and chronic cardiovascular conditions commonly encountered in paramedic practice across the lifespan;
  2. Interpret electrocardiograms for a normal patient and those experiencing cardiovascular abnormalities including dysrhythmias and acute coronary syndromes;
  3. Systematically assess a patient experiencing a cardiovascular emergency and associate the assessment with cardiovascular disease pathology;
  4. Plan and implement appropriate and safe management for a patient experiencing a cardiovascular emergency and accurately document and communicate the care provided;
  5. Identify drugs commonly used by advanced life support paramedics for the management of cardiovascular conditions. Discuss their actions and evaluate the appropriateness of their use in differing circumstances during a cardiovascular emergency;
  6. Discuss the diagnostic reasoning, clinical problem solving and clinical decision making processes that determine the care of patients with cardiovascular conditions in order to evaluate and justify management.

Assessment

3 x In-semester MCQ tests (30 minutes each) (30%)
Written assignment (2,000 words) (20%)
Exam (MCQ and short answer questions) (2 hours) (50%) (Hurdle)
Practical exam (20 minutes) (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 3445 or 3892.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Ms Linda Ross

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit aims to develop paramedic awareness and understanding of the cross-cultural and demographically diverse community groups they will encounter as primary health care providers, and extend their capacity to communicate, build rapport and meaningfully engage with these groups. Students will gain valuable community engagement and participation experience through structured volunteer placements within strategically selected private, public and indigenous health related settings. Students will actively participate within these facilities in all aspects of the care programs being delivered allowing them to develop communication, listening and teamwork and skills whilst acquiring an insight into community health issues. In addition students will explore the valuable role they play as health care professionals in educating the community about the paramedics' role, and contributing to patient understanding of medical emergencies and the range of health care services and options available to them. Finally, through their community participation students will be expected to identify real or perceived gaps within the community health sector and devise strategies to narrow those gaps and achieve better health outcomes.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the unique health concerns and requirements of the diverse population that paramedics care for within the community.
  2. Demonstrate an appreciation for the role interpersonal skills play in gaining patient trust and promoting better health outcomes.
  3. Identify ways in which community engagement can develop the scope of practice of the paramedics and enhance community relationships.
  4. Explore the role of the paramedic in developing community capability and awareness to better manage medical emergencies.
  5. Investigate the diverse needs of Indigenous Australians in the context of community based emergency health and identify ways in which the ambulance professional can enhance their awareness and participation in these needs.
  6. Propose and plan strategies designed to strengthen community relationships and promote initiatives to improve community health outcomes.

Assessment

Community health project (50%)
Volunteer community participation portfolio (50%)
Volunteer community participation (Hurdle)

Hurdle requirements: To pass the unit the student must complete 50 hours of Volunteer community participation and attend at least 80% of tutorials.

Workload requirements

Six hours per week involving community participation, lectures and tutorials.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Mr Damien Dambrosi

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Paramedics encounter an abundance of pharmaceutical agents within their practice. This unit is designed to assist students to develop foundational knowledge, skills and clinical judgements regarding pharmacotherapy within community-based emergency health. The social, political, legal and ethical implications of drug use and abuse within the individual, family and community will also be examined.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the basic principles of pharmacology, drug administration and monitoring as they relate to paramedic practice;
  2. Identify routes of administration, absorption rates and safe work practices as they relate to paramedic practice;
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in calculation of drug dosages for administration of medications by paramedics by a variety of routes;
  4. Describe the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemicals and substances introduced into the body;
  5. Examine legal responsibilities associated with the administration and safe keeping of drugs within paramedic practice;
  6. Discuss common pharmaceutical agents encountered within the pre-hospital setting;
  7. Analyse the social, political, cultural, legal and ethical implications of drug abuse in relation to legal and illegal drugs.

Assessment

Worksheet: Quizzes (15%)
Drug calculations exam (15%)
Written report (30%)
Final examination (40%)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials and practical exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3445.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Mr Craig Taylor

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician who is able to assess and care for patients with mental health problems in the community. The unit addresses the epidemiology and history of mental health in Australia, and the features of care systems with particular emphasis on community based care. Acute and chronic medical mental health problems commonly encountered by paramedics are investigated. The special needs of Indigenous persons and those from non-English speaking backgrounds are investigated. The unit is case-based, integrating material from the five themes and the underpinning biomedical, social and clinical sciences, and including clinical skills, laboratory and simulation scenarios to develop essential communication, assessment and management clinical skills, and clinical problem solving and decision making competencies.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, pathology and clinical manifestations of mental illness commonly encountered in paramedic practice.
  2. Communicate effectively with people who are experiencing disturbances of thoughts, feelings and behaviour.
  3. Perform a mental status assessment as applied to paramedic practice.
  4. Comply with the Mental Health Act (2014) guidelines when carrying out a search and search procedure on patients with a mental health emergency.
  5. Identify and apply therapeutic interventions and techniques appropriate to managing a mental health emergency in the community setting.
  6. Initiate appropriate care for patients with mental health issues, family members and carers in response to correctly identifying factors contributing to the situation.

Assessment

Mental status assessment (20%)
Pamphlet (20%)
Mid-semester exam (1 hour) (20%)
Exam (2 hours) (40%)
Attendance (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials and small group exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Dr Malcolm Boyle

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units. The unit explores commonly encountered acute and chronic health emergencies, with a focus on pain management. Using a combination of case-based learning, clinical laboratory work and simulation, this unit will develop the essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision-making competencies in managing common health emergencies.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, and pathology related to acute and chronic emergency medical conditions commonly encountered in paramedic practice;
  2. Describe the clinical manifestations of the selected medical conditions commonly encountered in paramedic practice;
  3. Demonstrate the ability to integrate and apply theoretical knowledge and clinical skills to the assessment and management of patients with selected acute and chronic medical emergencies across the lifespan;
  4. Relate the pharmacology of drugs and fluids used by paramedics in the management of common medical conditions, including drug indications and actions.

Assessment

Mid-semester examination (1 hour) (40%)
Written examination (2 hours) (60%)
Scenario-based clinical examination (30 minutes) (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures and simulation.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) / Bachelor of Nursing or Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic).


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

TBA

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit develops the role of the paramedic as a clinical leader in the community with the focus on major incidents and disasters. The unit explores disaster planning, response and recovery, and the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic when managing multiple patients or a complex setting, during a major health emergency or during a humanitarian disaster.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the roles and responsibilities of paramedics, emergency services and other health agencies in relation to a multi-casualty or major incident.
  2. Compare and contrast the management of major incident in a rural, remote or complex setting compared to the urban environment.
  3. Describe the broader requirements of para medics, emergency services and other health agencies during disaster management, in particular the management of public health issues and logistics management.
  4. Describe the importance of clinical leadership and clinical governance in community based emergency health system during a major incident or disaster and the requirement of an integrated approach to a major incident.
  5. Analyse the contemporary structure of a major incident control system in the Australian context, and describe the role of the paramedic in major incidents and disasters, particularly compared to normal operations.
  6. Outline the role of the paramedic in emergency management planning and preparedness in local and international settings.
  7. Analyse the public health and humanitarian issues that may arise from major incidents and disasters.
  8. Demonstrate effective logistical management, patient triage or participation in a response team during a simulated mass-casualty situation or major incident.

Assessment

Written assignment (2,000 words) (40%)
Clinical worksheets (20%)
Final examination (2 hours) (40%)
Major incident simulation (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Hurdle requirement: 80% attendance at tutorials and clinical simulations is mandatory to pass this unit.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials and small group exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

TBA

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Dr Malcolm Boyle

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit examines the principles of quality improvement, error and risk reduction, and clinical audit specifically relevant to CBEH. Contemporary challenges in community-based emergency health needs are discussed in the context of the Australian healthcare system. The impact of politics, funding, and changing demography on future population health needs are explored. Students will investigate alternative methods of delivering community-based emergency health and discuss the future role of paramedics in meeting the health needs of an aging population. The students will also apply research methods to the development of a research proposal that investigates a contemporary community based emergency health challenge.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the principles of quality improvement, error and risk reduction, and clinical audit and apply these principles to the setting of community-based emergency health;
  2. Utilise foundational knowledge of relevant research methods, to critically analyse selected community-based emergency health issues;
  3. Identify and discuss contemporary challenges in community-based emergency health using local, national and international literature;
  4. Apply the key principles of population health and public health system integration and co-ordination in the setting of selected community-based emergency health topics;
  5. Outline the principle features of the Australian healthcare system and the impact of politics, funding, and changing demography on CBEH;
  6. Analyse emergency health research priorities and apply these to community-based emergency health needs;
  7. Identify alternative methods of delivering community-based emergency health and discuss emerging opportunities for health professionals;
  8. Outline the process for implementing research findings into CBEH practice;
  9. Generate a research proposal using contemporary research methods.

Assessment

Assignment (1,000 words) (25%)
Group poster presentation (1,000 words) and oral presentation (30%)
Research proposal (3,000 words) (40%)
Online participation (5%)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures and tutorials.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Must have passed BEH1032.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3445.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Ms Linda Ross

Offered

Peninsula

  • Full year 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides the student with the opportunity to integrate knowledge acquired in their study in the primary emergency health care environment. The various tasks allow for the development of advanced skills with a focus on the study of health care within the emergency and community-based primary health care environments to assist in the transition to the workplace.

The unit will review of the graduate attributes needed to be an effective practitioner within the area of primary health care. The unit will focus on the knowledge, skills and values needed to practice as a paramedic. Each student is encouraged to identify their personal strengths, develop effective teamwork, situational awareness and personal skills through a process of reflection and continual improvement. Students will then apply this learning through simulations and actual workplace placements to enhance their role-readiness.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Critically evaluate the standard paramedic clinical approach to the assessment and care of patients in the community, hospital or other related health setting;
  2. Analyse and appraise the communication techniques utilised to inform, instruct and empower patients to manage their care;
  3. Provide appropriate care for patients at an advanced level within the simulation environment and while under supervision in a range of authentic clinical settings;
  4. Demonstrate appropriate professional, inter-professional and teamwork behaviours within the community and primary health care settings;
  5. Work as an effective team member with fellow paramedics and other health care professionals to provide high level evidence-based patient care;
  6. Demonstrate a culturally sensitive approach to personal reactions and those of patients and their families or carers to acute or chronic illness and or injury;
  7. Critically reflect on performances in the clinical setting to identify the adequacy of personal judgements and the internal and external factors influencing clinical decision making and higher order thinking;
  8. Appraise the care given by peers within simulations and where possible within the authentic environments through public reflection to learn from these actions and inform future practice;
  9. Evaluate the experiences gained within the simulation environment through reflection and judge the influence these may have on future practice within the workplace.

Fieldwork

Throughout the study period each student will complete 32 placement days of eight to ten hours duration.

Assessment

2 x Case studies (1,500 words) (40%)
2 x Case study presentations (30%)
2 x Simulation self-critiques (1,000 words) (30%)
Clinical skills log book (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

The students will be required to complete thirty two clinical placement days and attend timetabled clinical practicum days.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Students in the single degree must have successful completed all clinical units within the second year of the degree. If completing the double degree then all clinical units leading to the final year of that degree.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Mr Damien Dambrosi

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This is the final clinical unit for the paramedic undergraduate and brings together all the previous clinical units. It consolidates all previous learning and expands student knowledge to include more advanced concepts. The lectures and practical components of the unit are designed to challenge the student with more complexity. Advanced cardiology, paediatrics and other specialty situations such as hyperbaric emergencies are included. This unit will also prepare for the transition of the undergraduate to graduate practice.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply the combined knowledge of all previous clinical units to the critical care and specialty situation patients.
  2. At a graduate level, through scenario and simulation work, demonstrate an understanding of the presentation, assessment, and paramedic management of the selected critical care specialty conditions commonly encountered by paramedics.
  3. Evaluate the drugs commonly used by paramedics and apply their use to the management of selected critical care specialty conditions.
  4. Integrate the clinical approach at a graduate level, to demonstrate your high level of theoretical knowledge, and clinical skills, to assess and manage patients with selected critical care specialty conditions in 'real time' work simulation. This will involve using an extended range of skills including: clinical problem solving, clinical decision making, patient safety, communication and teamwork.
  5. Outline the structure of medical retrieval systems in Australia and the Asia-Pacific region and demonstrate the required clinical skills to participate in medical retrieval and/or inter-hospital transfers.
  6. Develop clinical preparedness for transition to employment as a graduate paramedic.

Assessment

Mid-semester exam (1 hour) (20%)
Group presentation (30 minutes) (30%)
Exam (2 hours) (50%) (Hurdle)
Practical exam (20 minutes) (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 3445 or 3892.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Dr Malcolm Boyle

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by extending clinical examination and decision making skills that were introduced in previous clinical units. The unit covers commonly encountered toxicological and environmental emergencies across the lifespan. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies. The scope of the unit includes the development of skills needed to provide effective out-of-hospital care for patients experiencing health emergencies related to toxicological or environmental exposure.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, population health, pathology and clinical manifestations of conditions associated with toxins and environmental exposure encountered in paramedic practice across the lifespan;
  2. Locate and evaluate evidence that informs paramedic clinical practice guidelines used to care for patients with toxicological and environmental conditions;
  3. Demonstrate systematic patient assessment and formulation of a statement describing the individual's alteration in health status;
  4. Demonstrate the planning and implementation of care and accurately document and communicate the care provided;
  5. Demonstrate effective communication and collaboration with patients, families and other members of the multidisciplinary health care team;
  6. Evaluate the appropriateness and efficacy of care in relation to the special needs of patients across the lifespan and the needs of patients, family and carers from Indigenous and culturally diverse backgrounds;
  7. Relate the pharmacology of drugs and toxins commonly associated with overdose or accidental exposure and antidotes used by paramedics for the management of these conditions;
  8. Reflect on the diagnostic reasoning, clinical problem solving and clinical decision making processes that influence the care of patients with toxicological and environmental conditions in order to evaluate and justify management decisions and identify threats to patient safety;
  9. Describe the special features and trends in the Australian health system relating to prevention and management of health emergencies related to toxins or environmental exposure.

Assessment

Poster (30%)
Mid-semester exam (1 hour) (20%)
Final exam (2 hours) (50%)
OSCE (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Ms Terry-Ann Davies

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the role of the paramedic as a clinician by developing knowledge and skills needed to care for birthing women and neonates in the community. The unit will be case based, and will include clinical skills laboratories and simulation to develop essential clinical skills, clinical problem solving and decision making competencies.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology, presentation and management of selected health conditions experienced by women during pregnancy, birth and following childbirth and recommend appropriate paramedic paramedic strategies;
  2. Describe models of care available in the maternity services;
  3. Identify and interpret the evidence supporting the paramedic care of pregnant and childbearing women and their babies;
  4. Outline and justify the level and type of paramedic care appropriate to the women during and immedaitely after childbirth emergencies in the community;
  5. Explain the processes of paramedic assessment of the newborn immediately after childbirth in both, uncomplicated and emergency situations, and select appropriate patient management discuss how cultural diversity can influence the care for pregnant women and consider approaches to paramedic care in a variety of situations.

Assessment

Online quiz assessment (10%)
Assignment (2,500 words) (40%)
End of semester examination (2 hours) (50%) (Hurdle)
4 x Compulsory attendance at simulation (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, online tutorials, tutorial/practical simulations and clinical laboratories.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or the Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice stream in Bachelor of Health Sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Dr Paul Jennings

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)
  • Full year 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Students will undertake a guided advanced studies program on the development of research in CBEH and in an aspect of CBEH of interest to the student. The unit aims to develop analytical abilities, communication skills, and advanced knowledge in a specific area of CBEH. Students will undertake a self-assessment to identify a topic of interest in CBEH that they will study at an advanced level. A negotiated learning contact will describe the advanced study which may include attendance at lectures, tutorials or courses in areas relevant to the discipline; preparation of an essay; critical evaluation of a published paper, case study or research data.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify areas of knowledge deficit in community-based emergency health practice and research and plan a study approach to address their learning needs;
  2. Demonstrate a commitment to learning by identifying resources within the university and community-based emergency health services that can be accessed to address their learning needs;
  3. Accurately locate and critically assess research literature, with an emphasis on community-based emergency health;
  4. Demonstrate suitable oral presentation skills to an audience of peers, superiors and academic staff;
  5. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of an aspect of community-based emergency health.

Assessment

Negotiated skills development (10%)
Literature review (3,500 words) (70%)
Seminar presentation (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Dr Paul Jennings

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)
  • Full year 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Together with BEH4300 Community Emergency Health Research Project, this unit aims to increase student understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of research in community-based emergency health and to develop their analytic, research and communication skills. Students will undertake guided studies in research methodology and complete a supervised research project with the aim of developing both discipline specific and generic research skills.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the different methods of knowledge acquisition and synthesis.
  2. Discuss the ethical, legal and cultural responsibilities of scientific investigation.
  3. Describe the principles of "Good clinical research" as described by the NH&MRC, with an emphasis on research in community-based emergency health.
  4. Describe the phases of the research process.
  5. Discuss basic research concepts and methodology, in both quantitative and qualitative experimental designs.
  6. Critically review scientific literature in community-based emergency health.
  7. Consult with both a statistician and a qualitative researcher to discuss the role of methodology consultants in the research process.
  8. Write up scientific work in a potentially publishable manner.
  9. Prepare and present suitable oral and written presentations for the emergency health academic, research and scientific community.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to pursue higher studies in community-based emergency health.
  11. Demonstrate competence in locating, assessing and storing research literature with an emphasis on community-based emergency health.
  12. Design an appropriate research methodology to address an identified research issue/question in consultation with the supervisor.

Assessment

Ethics application (40%)
Research proposal (2,500 words) (40%)
Seminar presentation (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Dr Paul Jennings

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)
  • Full year 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit aims to increase student understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of research in community-based emergency health and to develop their analytic, research and communication skills. Students will undertake guided studies in research methodology and complete a supervised research project with the aim of developing both discipline specific and generic research skills

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the different methods of knowledge acquisition and synthesis.
  2. Discuss the ethical, legal, and cultural responsibilities of scientific investigation.
  3. Describe the principles of "Good Clinical Research", as described by the NH&MRC, with an emphasis on research in community-based emergency health.
  4. Describe the phases of the research process.
  5. Discuss basic research concepts and methodology, in both quantitative and qualitative experimental designs.
  6. Critically review the scientific literature in community-based emergency health.
  7. Consult with both a statistician and a qualitative researcher to discuss the role of methodology consultants in the research process.
  8. Write up scientific work in a potentially publishable manner.
  9. Prepare and present suitable oral and written presentations for the emergency health academic, research and scientific community.
  10. Demonstrate a range of technical skills appropriate to community-based emergency health research.
  11. Demonstrate the ability to pursue higher studies in community based emergency health.
  12. Discuss the breadth and diversity of research in health sciences.
  13. Plan and implement a research project and prepare the associated report.

Assessment

Research report (3,500 - 5,000 words) (80%)
Seminar presentation (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3881.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kate Carroll

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is the first of two units designed to educate health science students about the anatomical structures and physiological functions of the systems of the human body that underpin the regulatory mechanisms for homeostatic control. Students will be introduced to the principles of cell biology, tissue types and their origins together with their importance in maintaining the homeostasis of the various body systems. The key anatomical features of the integumentary and musculoskeletal systems will be examined as well as their role in the control of homeostasis. The central and peripheral nervous system will be addressed in the context of its physiological characteristics and with special attention to the anatomical features of the spinal cord and brain. Students will be introduced to the various functions of the brain in the context of homeostasis and control, together with the special senses. Throughout the unit, clinical connections will be made with the systems addressed so that students will understand the relevance of the topics included in the unit to the health and human science disciplines.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the levels of structural organisation within the human body and apply the concept of homeostasis.
  2. Describe the cellular and tissue organisation of the body and explain their importance in relation to the integumentary system.
  3. Identify the structural components of the musculoskeletal system and explain how it protects, supports and moves the body.
  4. Describe the major anatomical divisions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and relate the sensory, integrative and responsive functions to homeostatic imbalances.
  5. Describe the key anatomical areas of the brain, the structural organisation and list the associated functions.
  6. Explain the main structural components of the special sense organs, their functions and the clinical relevance of dysfunctions in these organs and associated neural pathways.

Assessment

Pre-learning assessment (10%)
Group poster (1,000 words) plus presentation (10%)
iSAP case (Clinical action plan: 1,000 words and comparative report: 500 words) (20%)
Anatomy flag race (20%)
End of semester exam (MCQ and short/extended answer questions) (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle requirement:
80% attendance at tutorials, workshops and practicals and completion (80%) of online pre-class activities.

Workload requirements

5 - 6 contact hours per week (lectures, tutorials, workshops and practicals),
5 - 6 hours private study per week.

Students will be expected to complete online pre and post work in a case based learning setting that will be followed up in face-to-face classes.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following courses:
M2002, M20021, M20022, M20023, M20024

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Sharon Flecknoe

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is the second of the two units designed to familiarise health science students with the anatomical structures and physiological functions of the systems of the human body that underpin the regulatory mechanisms for homeostatic control. Students will be introduced to the structure and function of the cardiovascular, circulatory and respiratory systems together with their vital role in maintaining homeostasis. The key features of the lymphatic system and the properties of blood will be discussed. The unit will continue with a look at the importance of the endocrine system and its role in integrating various functions to control homeostasis. Students will be introduced to the key anatomical and physiological features of the urinary and digestive systems and the importance of maintaining pH and fluid balance within the body. Finally, students will be introduced to the reproductive systems, pregnancy and development. Throughout the unit, clinical connections will be made with the systems addressed so that students will understand the relevance of the topics included in the unit to the health and human science disciplines.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the interdependence of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems and how they maintain homeostasis.
  2. Discuss the components and functions of blood and the lymphatic system and how they maintain homeostasis.
  3. Explain how the endocrine system integrates various body functions.
  4. Outline the functions of the urinary system and explain how it contributes to maintaining pH, blood volume and the composition of body fluids.
  5. Identify the structures of the digestive system and explain their role in digestion, absorption and metabolism.
  6. Describe the structures of the male and female reproductive systems and explain how offspring are produced with respect to gametogenesis, fertilisation, embryonic and foetal development, maternal adaptations and patterns of inheritance.

Assessment

Pre-learning assessment (10%)
Group project (1,000 words or equivalent), plus presentation) (10%)
iSAP case (Clinical action plan: 1,000 words and comparative report: 500 words) (20%)
Mid semester test (MCQ/SAQ) (20%)
End of semester exam (MCQ and short/extended answer questions (2 hours) (40%)

Workload requirements

5-6 contact hours per week (lectures, tutorials, workshops and practicals).
5-6 hours private study per week.

Students will be expected to complete online pre and post work in a case based learning setting that will be followed up in face-to-face classes.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

ust be enrolled in a Bachelor of Health Science specialisation (course code M20021, M20022, M20023 or M20024)

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Wayne Sturrock & Dr Natalie Bennett

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is the first in a sequence of two biomedical science units that provides foundation knowledge of human anatomy and physiology relevant to the allied health professions of nursing, midwifery and occupational therapy. Students will learn the biological basis of human health, and the workings of the human body. The unit introduces students to the scientific methods of thought; it encourages the critical evaluation of evidence, and promotes an awareness of the changing nature of medical knowledge. The major themes of study are the structural levels of body organisation, communication via the nervous and endocrine systems, the reproductive system and early stages of human development. Topics include the chemical and cellular basis of human life; integration of body functions and homeostasis; the structure and function of the integumentary system; the structure and function of the nervous; the endocrine system; and the reproductive system.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Classify the levels of structural organisation, and give examples for homeostatic control mechanisms of them;
  2. Describe the processes occurring in the structural and functional divisions of the nervous system, and explain triggers of homeostatic imbalances;
  3. Distinguish the structural and functional areas of the brain, and discriminate between different causes of homeostatic imbalances;
  4. Identify the components of the endocrine system, and explain how they maintain homeostasis;
  5. Explain gametogenesis and fertilisation in the context of male and female reproductive structures;
  6. Systematically analyse the causes of homeostatic imbalances; and interpret symptoms using evidenced-based science.

Assessment

Weekly online tests (MCQ) (10%)
Mid-semester exam (MCQ) (1 hour) (20%)
Laboratory test (25%)
Examination (MCQ/SAQ) (2 hours) (45%)


Hurdle: Attendance at 100% of tutorials and laboratory sessions, unless a medical certificate is provided.

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures, 1 hour tutorial and 2 hours practical or online work per week. An additional 6 hours of private study is recommended.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Nursing (Community Health), Bachelor of Nursing Practice, Diploma of Tertiary Studies, Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic), Bachelor of Midwifery, Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (Honours), or Bachelor of Health Sciences.

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Elise Randle-Barrett

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is the second in a sequence of two health science units that provides foundation knowledge of human anatomy and physiology relevant for allied health professions. The major themes of study in this unit are: body support and movement, cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, the respiratory system, the urinary system and the control of body fluids; the digestive system and the processing of nutrients in the body; the lymphoid/immune system, and microbes and infection.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Relate the structure of the major bones, joints and muscles to the functions of support and movement;
  2. Explain how the cardiovascular system facilitates transport and maintains homeostasis;
  3. Describe how the structures of the respiratory system enable ventilation and gas exchange;
  4. Locate the organs of the digestive system and describe the processes of digestion, absorption and metabolism;
  5. Discuss how urine is formed and the role of the kidneys in maintaining fluid composition and balance;
  6. Outline the body's innate and adaptive defences and how they determine the nature of interactions with microbes.

Assessment

Online test (10%)
Mid-semester exam (1 hour) (20%)
Laboratory test (30%)
Examination (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle: Attendance at 100% of tutorials and laboratory sessions, unless a medical certificate is provided.

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures, 1 hour of tutorial and 2 hours practical or online work per week. An additional 6 hours per week of private study is recommended.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic), Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (Honours) or Bachelor of Health Sciences.

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Natalie Bennett

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is the second in a sequence of two health science units that provides foundation knowledge of human anatomy and physiology relevant to the allied health professions of nursing and midwifery. The unit develops further the critical evaluation of evidence and an awareness of the changing nature of knowledge in the health sciences. The major themes in this unit of study are: body support and movement, cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, the respiratory system, the urinary system and the control of body fluids; the digestive system and the processing of nutrients in the body; the lymphoid/immune system, and microbes and infection.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Relate the structure of the major bones, joints and muscles to the functions of support and movement;
  2. Explain how the cardiovascular system facilitates transport and maintains homeostasis;
  3. Describe how the structures of the respiratory system enable ventilation and gas exchange;
  4. Locate the organs of the digestive system and describe the processes of digestion, absorption and metabolism;
  5. Discuss how urine is formed and the role of the kidneys in maintaining fluid composition and balance;
  6. Outline the body's innate and adaptive defences and how they determine the nature of interactions with microbes.

Assessment

Online test (10%)
Mid-semester exam (1 hour) (20%)
Laboratory test (30%)
Examination (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle: Attendance at 100% of tutorials and laboratory sessions, unless a medical certificate is provided.

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures, 1 hour of tutorial and 2 hours practical or online work per week. An additional 6 hours per week of private study is recommended.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 2552 or 3562 or 3892 or 3953 or 3963 or 4506 or 4514.

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Andrew Davies

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Processes of disease will be presented in the form of case studies, in which an analysis of the disease process will lead to an understanding of the presentation, and opportunities for management, of that disease. The major areas of study are: Disease at the cellular level, Cardiovascular disease, Respiratory disease, Cerebrovascular disease, Neoplastic disease, Renal disease, Disorders of the digestive tract, Liver disease, Endocrine disease, Genetic disease, and Bone and joint disorders.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the major causes of cell damage and responses to such damage;
  2. Explain how cell, organ and whole-body functions are affected by various disease processes;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of pathological processes in selected genetic diseases, and explain the modes of inheritance of those diseases;
  4. Develop skills in the observation, presentation and critical evaluation of clinical data; and
  5. Relate the above accounts of disease processes to the presentation of relevant diseases, and discuss rationales for their management.

Assessment

Examination (2 hours) (60%)
Online tests (5% each x 2) (10%)
Laboratory/tutorial work x 5 (30%)

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

HSC1101 and HSC1102, or BMA1901 and one of BMA1902 or BMA1912.

Prohibitions

BMS2011, BMS2031, PHY2021 or PHY2032.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Andrew Davies

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit involves a study of common communicable diseases with a focus on the prevention and management of infections encountered in a diversity of health care settings. Laboratory-based case studies are used to study hospital-acquired and community-acquired infections including wound infections, common infections in the oncology, transplant and maternity wards, vaccine-preventable infections in children, outbreaks of community-acquired infections, communicable infections in indigenous populations and in developing countries. Various public health control measures including disease surveillance, immunisation, antimicrobial therapies, and infection control practices are discussed.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the distinguishing features of the major groups of pathogenic microorganisms;
  2. Recognize that the occurrence of infectious disease is the outcome of interactions between microbial factors, host factors, physical environmental factors and social influences;
  3. Explain how communicable infections are spread in health care settings and in community settings;
  4. Use a basic knowledge of epidemiological methods to understand the investigation of outbreaks of communicable disease in populations;
  5. Recognize the particular challenges in controlling communicable disease in remote areas of Australia and in developing countries;
  6. Assess the efficacy of infection control strategies, antimicrobial therapies, and immunization in the control and management of major communicable diseases; and
  7. Elaborate on the principles of infection control by using appropriate examples in acute care settings and community-based care settings.

Assessment

Written exam (2 hours) (50%)
MCQ tests (2 in class) (10% each - total 20%)
Written case report (30%)

Workload requirements

4 hours on campus, 1 hour online.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

HSC1101 and HSC1102, or BMA1901 and one of BMA1902 or BMA1912.

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Helen Ackland

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit examines the ways in which health systems are organised and health services are delivered. The broader context in which disease and illness occur is also discussed. The unit considers the Australian health care system in detail and the global context of health systems and health inequalities. It explores two areas: health policy and service delivery systems; and illness and health in the context of social, cultural and behavioural systems. Areas covered include: health systems, health policy, health funding, quality in health systems, models of health, population health, and health and human rights.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Understand key principles in the organisation and funding of health systems.
  2. Be able to apply an understanding of health and health services in the context of the Australian health care system.
  3. Recognise the key elements determining health policy.
  4. Recognise key determinants and models of health.
  5. Understand the complexities of improving population health and the ways in which this is evaluated.
  6. Recognise the basis of human rights in health care.
  7. Develop important professional skills, including oral and written communication skills, critical analysis skills, and interpersonal skills.

Assessment

Tutorial preparation and participation (15%)
Group presentation (15 minutes) and report (800 words) (20%)
Research essay (2500 words) (25%)
Written examination (MCQ/SAQ) (2 hours) (40%)

Workload requirements

6 hours of contact time per week (2 hour lecture, 2 hours of interactive classes and 2 hours tutorial preparation time).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Coordinator(s)

Dr Megan Wallace, Associate Professor Tim Moss

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is on a first-in, first enrolled basis.

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides an overview of physiological processes involved in fetal and neonatal development, and the role of the placenta in pregnancy and parturition. The unit will consider the structure, development and maturation of the major organ systems in the fetus, and the means by which the fetus is able to adapt to alterations in its environment. The unit reviews the physiology of parturition (birth), the physiological changes in the fetus and newborn during the transition at birth, and the consequences of prematurity and postmaturity. The major physiological changes occurring in the mother during pregnancy are also dealt with.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Contrast and compare the structure, development and function of body systems before and after birth.
  2. Explain the physiological changes that occur in the fetus during its transition to life after birth.
  3. Discuss and predict consequences of impaired transition at birth for postnatal survival, health and well-being.
  4. Evaluate research experiments in perinatology in regard to their contribution to evidence-based medicine.
  5. Synthesize and critically discuss the literature, then formulate and justify research methodology to address a knowledge gap in perinatology.

Assessment

Semester-long experimental research project (20%)
Weekly research activity reports (30%)
End of semester theory exam (50%) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

5 hours per week.
2 hours of lectures and 3 hours each week attending actual medical research experiments that address current clinical problems in fetal and neonatal healthcare.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Any two of BMS2011, BMS2031, DEV2011, DEV2022, PHY2011, PHY2021, PHY2032, PHY2042 or with permission.

Prohibitions

PHY3082.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Nirma Samarawickrema

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces the student to the chemistry of organic molecules and the biochemistry of cells. We examine the role of functional groups in biological molecules of biomedical importance and common reactions in metabolism. We reinforce concepts of ionisation and pH. We discuss the chemistry of proteins and their physical properties in solution leading up to an examination of enzyme catalysis and kinetics. This lays the foundation for an examination of the biological oxidation of fats and carbohydrates that provides the cell with energy. We examine the way energy is stored in times of plenty and relate our understanding to normal and disease states that occur.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the chemical and biochemical aspects of functional groups in biological molecules.
  2. Explain the common reactions found in metabolic systems such as oxidation-reduction, bond formation, bond breaking events and a knowledge of the role of water.
  3. Explain the role of equilibrium and kinetic processes in biology and the describe concepts of enzyme catalysis.
  4. Describe biological oxidation and the metabolic release of energy.
  5. Describe the chemistry of important biological polymers and lipids and the reactions they undergo in the cell.
  6. Describe the biochemistry of molecules and reactions of biomedical importance.
  7. Draw relationships between these reactions and normal and disease states that occur.

Assessment

End of semester exam (60%)
Assessment during semester which can include small group session marks, self-directed learning exercises and on-line quizzes (25%) (online quizzes are less than 10%)
Mid-semester test (15%)

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

3 lectures and a 3-hour small group session or computer based or self-directed learning per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Chantal Hoppe

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces the student to the fundamental units of life (the cells) and explores how cells come together to form primary tissues which subsequently combine to form the organ systems and ultimately the living organism. Cellular structure and metabolism is studied including the chemical constituents of living cells and the biological reactions that take place in them. Basic developmental biology concepts associated with the patterning of the body plan and embryological origins of cells and tissues are introduced and animal diversity in an evolutionary context is explored. The unit also introduces students to the microbial world and explores the structure and function of the immune system and how the body develops an immune response.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the properties and function of cells and explain how the primary tissue types combine to form a complete organism;
  2. Describe the effects of cellular mechanisms and environmental impacts on human development, and identify how they are applied in health and biotechnology;
  3. Describe the ways in which organisms regulate their internal systems and environment;
  4. Explain the principles behind the development of an immune response and the role of microorganisms in health and disease;
  5. Demonstrate critical thinking and written communication skills in the synthesis of an essay on an area of contemporary biomedical research;
  6. Perform laboratory techniques integral to the study of biomedical sciences and analyse and interpret results in consultation with research literature.

Assessment

Essay (1,000 words) (15%)
Practical class reports (25%)
Mid-semester summative test (1 hour) (10%)
Final exam (3 hours) (50%)

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

3 lectures and a 3-hour practical or equivalent per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Professor Kristian Helmerson, Professor Helena Parkington

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The behaviour of human and biomedical systems are understood in terms of underlying physical principles. Forces involved in human movement and body systems including muscles and joints. Energy and heat flow and metabolism, pressure, osmosis, diffusion and respiration, fluid flow in the cardiovascular system. Electrical charges, current, potential and capacitance in simple circuits, EEG, ECG, cells and nerve conduction. Sound and ultrasound, human hearing, refraction and lenses, the human eye, optical and electron microscopes. X-rays and radiation, biological effects and damage, radiation therapy and medical imaging.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to apply concepts of physics and introductory physiology as they relate to biomedical sciences in the following areas:

  1. The laws of motion and the concepts of work, energy and power as they relate to human movement and biomechanics.
  2. Heat transfer and thermal properties, the behaviour of gases and fluids applied to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems.
  3. Principles of electricity, potential difference, current, resistance and capacitance; the basis of Nerst potential and the biological membrane potential, nerve conduction, ECG.
  4. Wave motion, the physics of sound and the properties of light and their relationship to auditory and visual phenomena, the function of the human eye and ear.
  5. Radiation physics underlying the medical use of x-rays and radiation in medicine and biomedical sciences including the effect of ionising radiation on living matter.

Students will develop basic practical skills in problem solving, experimental methods and uncertainties, analysis of data and written scientific communication.

Assessment

Written examination (3 hours) (50%)
Practical work (25%)
Assignments (3 items consisting of set questions, online quizzes and a fact sheet A4 poster) (25%)

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

3 lectures and 3 hours laboratory and problem solving per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)
+ Bachelor of Radiation Sciences

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Basia Diug

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Applications of epidemiological and statistical concepts and methods to typical problems in population health and in the biomedical literature. This will include consideration of fundamental ethical issues pertaining to the conduct of biomedical research and population health interventions. Much emphasis is placed on a population view of health and disease, social determinants of health, epidemiological principles, research study design and statistical analyses of data.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate and show application of core public health principles including epidemiology, biostatistics and ethics in health research.
  2. Explain how disease is measured in populations and critically analyse the strengths and weaknesses of different epidemiological study designs which are used in public health research.
  3. Critically appraise the popular and biomedical literature in public health.
  4. Identify fundamental ethical considerations that underpin health research.
  5. Identify and apply the importance of statistical methods in the design, analysis and presentation of the results of research studies in health and biomedicine, and in reports of health-related matters in general.
  6. Interpret statistical results presented and identify limitations in the biomedical literature and other media and convey the interpretation in simple language.

Assessment

Written examination (2 hours) (50%)
2 x Online quizzes (10%)
Media and journal critical review (15%)
Public health data analysis (15%)
Oral presentation (10%)

Workload requirements

Biostatistics: 3 hours per week, Epidemiology/Ethics: 3 hours per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic)
+ Bachelor of Psychological Science Advanced (Honours)


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Nicholas Price

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit consists of an introduction to human nervous system which ranges in scope from the operations of individual nerve cells at the molecular level to the generation of complex cognitive behaviours. The unit will provide students with an essential overview of the human nervous system and it will also serve as a foundation for more specialised studies in neurobiology or cognitive science.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and communication;
  2. Have gained some insight into how the brain enables us to sense our environment and to move, feel, think and communicate with others;
  3. Describe how the human brain and behaviour evolved;
  4. Explain how behaviour can be influenced by genetic makeup, environmental and social factors and drugs; and
  5. Acquire some basic skills in obtaining, interpreting and presenting scientific data.

Assessment

Theory examination (60%) (20% in semester assessment, 40% end of semester (3 hours))
Practical work (4 worksheets and quizzes) (40%)

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit.

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Timothy Cole

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Gene structure and function, including the genetic code and its interpretation, the assembly of genes and chromosomal organisation, and the basics of the genetic flow of information from DNA to RNA to protein. Mechanisms of gene expression and regulation, gene replication and repair, and the causes and implications of genetic mutations. Molecular genetics and recombinant DNA technology for the manipulation of genes. Genomics and its applications in medicine and principles of gene therapy.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Have a theoretical and practical understanding of the biological molecules which make up the blueprint of life;
  2. Describe the interactions of biological molecules which constitute essential processes in living cells;
  3. Acquire the basic technical skills essential for experimental molecular biology;
  4. Have a sound basis for advanced studies in molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology in later years of the course; and
  5. Have the skills required to use the Internet molecular biology resources to complement conventional written information.

Assessment

Theory examination (3 hours) (60%)
Practical course (30%)
Mid semester MCQ test (1 hour) (10%)

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

3 lectures per week and 3 hours laboratory per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions

MCB2011, MOL2011.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Justin Adams, Dr Luca Fiorenza

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This course is an introduction to human anatomy. It includes an overview of general principles of major body systems. This will be followed by a consideration of specific areas of regional anatomy from an evolutionary perspective. Namely, what distinguishes the human body from other primates, mammals and indeed vertebrates and how have these adaptations of anatomy contributed in a functional context to us being so successful. Practical classes will involve exposure to human cadaver prosections, skeletal material, models and a range of imaging modalities including X-rays, CT scans etc.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a basic anatomical literacy; i.e. describe and discuss the composition and relationships of the tissues, organs, systems, and regions that make up the human body.
  2. Relate anatomical structures (tissues, organs, systems) to basic developmental processes and contexts.
  3. Use comparative approaches to identify evolutionary and functional contexts of anatomical structures.
  4. Describe the specific evolutionary context of human anatomy.
  5. Use creative techniques (e.g. drawing, photography, body painting) to illustrate internal and external anatomy.
  6. Communicate anatomical information and concepts using a range of media (visual, oral presentation, writing).
  7. Relate sectional radiographic images to topological anatomy using digital 3D models.
  8. Work collaboratively to collect and analyse anatomical data.

Assessment

In-semester tests (30%)
Group research project (15%)
Practical class assessments (25%)
End-of-semester exam (2 hours) (30%)

Due to a change in the hurdle policy, a pass in the in-semester tests and the final exam must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures, 2 hours of practical content(face to face) with outside class practical workbook each week and group project completion between weeks 4-9. An additional 7 hours of private study is recommended per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics

Prohibitions

ANT2331.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Janet Macaulay

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit covers the molecular principles of cellular metabolic regulation, metabolic interrelationship of tissues, molecular events associated with the fed and fasted states, and the generation of metabolic energy by oxidation of macronutrients. It discusses hormone action and the molecular and cellular basis of diseases and gives an overview of tissue metabolism. It covers the molecular mechanism of cell growth, differentiation and death. It gives an introduction to molecular medicine based on the specialised tissue metabolism of blood and brain cells.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss how energy and nutrients are supplied to mammalian cells and how metabolism is regulated and integrated.
  2. Discuss the mechanisms by which cells communicate to coordinate metabolism, cell growth, differentiation and cell death.
  3. Describe the mechanisms by which precursor cells differentiate into mature cells.
  4. Explain the molecular and cellular basis of selected diseases.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to present, analyse and interpret data from molecular and cell biological experiments clearly and concisely in oral and written form.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to work in a team.

Assessment

Exam (3 hours) (55%)
Small group learning sessions (35%)
Online quizzes (10%)

A pass in the final exam must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

3 lectures per week and 3 hours practical or equivalent.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Behavioural Neuroscience

Prohibitions

BCH2022, BND2021.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Julia Choate

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Physiology is the study of how living organisms work. It involves the functions of cells, tissues, organs and the whole organism. This unit will provide you with an overview of how the body maintains a constant environment for its cells and tissues through the integrated functions of the following physiological systems: cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, respiratory, reproductive and gastrointestinal. You will also consider how the body adapts to changes in the external environment and to disease states.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the functions and controls of the cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive and digestive systems in the human body;
  2. Describe how the body systems integrate in order to maintain homeostasis following exercise or blood loss;
  3. Plan and conduct scientific experiments and analyse and interpret the associated experimental data related to the effects of ventricular filling on cardiac contraction, the effect of exercise on cardiovascular function, the effect of a water loading on urinary excretion and the effects of autonomic nerves on gut motility;
  4. Communicate experimental results in the format of scientific figures and written reports.

Assessment

Examination (50%)
Assignment (20%)
Tests (30%)

A pass in the final exam must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

3 lectures per week and 3 hours practical or equivalent.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions

BND2011, PHY2011, PHY2021 and PHY2032.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Saw Hoon Lim

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces the basic genetic principles underlying modern human genetics. Topics include: the central role of genes in the inheritance of traits, and the complex variation in inheritance patterns that arise due to interactions of genes with each other and the environment; the identification, characterisation and mapping of human genes; the value of model organisms in genetics; chromosome variation and its role in both evolution and human disease; how genes function and how genetic malfunction can lead to genetic disease; how an understanding of such diseases at the genetic level may assist in diagnosis, prevention and therapy; the genetic control of development; genetic counselling and calculating risk for genetic diseases; human evolutionary genetics.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the central role of genes in the inheritance of traits and the complex variation in inheritance patterns that arise due to interactions of genes with each other and the environment;
  2. Explain how genetic variation is generated by mutation and the importance of this in phenotypic variation, evolution and disease;
  3. Describe the value of model organisms in studying human gene function in development and disease;
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the relevance and value of genetics to human society;
  5. Demonstrate skills in independent problem-solving and experimental design, and in data collection, analysis and interpretation;
  6. Demonstrate skills in written and oral communication through written reports and oral presentations of research findings by small groups.

Assessment

Examination (3 hours) (50%) (Hurdle)
Continuous assessment (Weekly laboratory analysis questions, short answer practical test, group oral presentation) (37.5%)
Independent project (12.5%)

Workload requirements

3 lectures and 3 hours practical (or equivalent) per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

BMS1062 or MOL2011.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Biotechnology

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Professor Brian Cooke

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The following aspects of the interactions of microbes with their hosts will be presented in lectures, tutorials, discussion groups and videos: The history of infectious diseases, medically important viruses and bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms in infectious diseases, immunity to infection, and their regulation, control of infection by vaccines and drugs, and emerging diseases.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of micro-organisms in health and disease;
  2. Describe how host and pathogenic factors of micro-organisms affect the outcome of infection;
  3. Describe basic mechanisms of immunity to infection and the development and use of vaccines;
  4. Explain how infectious diseases are spread, tracked and controlled, and the susceptibility and resistance of microbial pathogens to antimicrobial agents;
  5. Describe some examples of microbial pathogens including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, the diseases that they cause, their mechanisms of pathogenesis, and treatment;
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of microbiological methodology and laboratory skills that are used to study and diagnose microbial pathogens.

Assessment

Written theory examination (40%)
Mid-semester examination (10%)
Practical examination (25%)
In-semester laboratory and tutorial components (25%)

Workload requirements

3 lectures and one 3-hour laboratory class or tutorial/discussion session per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Anna Roujeinikova, Dr Terry Kwok

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Bioinformatics unites the major advances in biology, biochemistry and the biomedical sciences with those in computing, bioinformatics and networking. The unit covers the application of the internet to biomedical sciences; organisation and uses of scientific databases; use of computational methods in genomics and proteomics; fundamentals of molecular modelling; analysis and presentation of biomedical data; and communication of biomedical data using information technology.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Have a basic understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of information technology and its wider application to the medical sciences.
  2. Develop an understanding of the principles of database searching, using search engines, sequence alignments, molecular phylogeny, molecular modelling, protein structure and analysis and medical imaging.
  3. Develop their communication and presentation skills and understand the involvement of information technology in the biomedical sciences.

Assessment

Written examinations (50%) made up of:
Revision quiz (3%)
Mid-semester test (12%)
Final exam (35%) (Hurdle)
Projects and assignments (50%)

A pass in the final exam and mid-semester test must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

2 Lectures per week, 1 three hour practical session per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions

MOL2022.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Professor Michael Ryan

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will provide an introduction into the molecular mechanisms that mediate human diseases and the specific biotechnologies used to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. The disease mechanisms mediated by genetic disorders resulting in abnormalities in protein folding, protein trafficking and gain or loss of protein function will be presented. State of the art developments in molecular medicine including transgenic models of human disease, gene therapy, and recent developments in transplantation will be highlighted. Specific biotechnologies to be discussed include production of recombinant proteins, antibody engineering and gene editing approaches.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the mechanisms by which molecular defects cause human disease, including the mechanisms by which gene abnormalities may lead to various abnormalities in protein structure and function.
  2. Give examples of the role of molecular techniques in contributing to the diagnosis of specific human diseases.
  3. Discuss the use of current and emerging molecular biotechnology techniques to determine the molecular pathology of diseases and to design targeted therapies or specific treatments.
  4. Outline molecular and biotechnology research methodologies and identify the skills required to undertake a research project in a research laboratory.
  5. Identify and articulate the research process as a collaborative endeavour locally and internationally, as well as understand the roles of grants, publications and ethics in biomedical scientific research.
  6. Synthesise, integrate and summarise information from fundamental principles and techniques in biomedical sciences, then apply it to broader contexts.
  7. Work effectively and communicate constructively within small groups in the planning, development and implementation of teamwork tasks. This will involve individual and group responsibilities and adherence to project timelines.
  8. Use the skills acquired to communicate research data and scientific ideas, verbally and in writing using scientific and lay language as appropriate.

Assessment

Mid semester examination (50 minutes) (10%)
Final examination (3 hours) (54%) (Hurdle)
Small group activity modules (36%)

A pass in the final examination must be obtained to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

3 lectures per week and 3 hours small group activities per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

BMS2042 and one of BCH2022 or BMS2021.
(Note for Biotechnology students: Students only need to pass BCH2022)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Bachelor of Biotechnology

Prohibitions

BMS3031.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Basia Diug and Dr Bradley Broughton

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will have a combined approach and examine the biomedical and epidemiological impacts of human disease on society. It will concentrate on the pathobiological and biomedical basis of prevalent human disease processes. Relevant areas examined in this unit may change from year to year but will generally include immune and inflammatory diseases, (e.g. inflammatory renal and joint disease); cancer biology (focussing on mechanisms of tumour spread); cardiovascular biology, (coronary heart disease/cerebrovascular disease); diabetes, obesity and neurological diseases. Disease pathogenesis, including lessons gained from cell/molecular biology and disease models will be the major focus. Concurrently, the epidemiological/clinical features of each disease, current treatments, challenges and future treatment prospects, including clinical trials will be covered highlighting the importance of an evidence-based approach to health care. This will discuss the complexities behind treatment based decision making by reviewing the evidence- base and understanding the criteria for deciding on what is best evidence. This unit will consider the biomedical basis and epidemiology in the context of the Australian health care system, including the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), health policy and service delivery systems, putting illness and health in the context of social, cultural and behavioural systems.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Integrate and apply their knowledge from previous core units in the study of specific human diseases;
  2. Describe and distinguish between the pathobiological processes related to disease;
  3. Recognise and cite evidence for how biomedical research, including cell biology, animal models of disease and human studies are important in defining the pathogenesis of disease and the optimal treatment of disease in a public health context;
  4. Demonstrate sophisticated interpretation and application of epidemiological methods and principles and discuss critically and cite evidence for the impact of disease on the individual and society;
  5. Identify and evaluate the contribution of the epidemiological studies involved in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases and justify your reasoning;
  6. Critically assess the epidemiological quality of research in a range of studies outlining the basis of your methodological approach and criteria for determining the quality of the research;
  7. Synthesise and critically analyse medical literature to discover future challenges in disease pathogenesis and treatment;
  8. Further develop research skills including collaborative team work, clear communication and interpersonal skills as well as critical thinking and writing skills.

Assessment

Written exam (3 hours) (45%)
In-semester activities (Online quiz) (10%)
Small group activities (Tutorial based activities) (15%)
Systematic review (Oral and written presentation) (4,000 words) (30%)

Workload requirements

4 hours per week (lectures) plus 4 hours per week for small group work. There is a total of 8 hours per week in contact time and 16 hours of private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Prohibitions

BMS3042.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Yvonne Hodgson

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides the opportunity for high achieving students to work with an academic supervisor and complete a substantial research project in the Biomedical Sciences. The research project may be chosen from a list of projects available at the beginning of semester from any of the Departments in the School of Biomedical Sciences. The unit convenor and supervisor must approve the project topic at the time of enrolment. Students will work in a research laboratory to obtain data, will complete a written preliminary and final report and will give a series of oral presentations on their work.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Review scientific literature in the project area, including the ability to identify key information in this area;
  2. Access databases for provision of information;
  3. Present oral reports;
  4. Construct written reports;
  5. Manage workloads to meet deadlines;
  6. Work with a significant degree of independence;
  7. Plan a large project, including the ability to adjust planning as events and results dictate;
  8. Conduct appropriate statistical analysis of results;
  9. Perform routine laboratory measurements and manipulations;
  10. Maintain efficient and meaningful communication with a project supervisor;
  11. Use technical word processing packages and graphics software.

Assessment

Two oral reports (preliminary 15 minutes: 10% and final 15 minutes: 10%) (20%)
Two written reports (preliminary 1,500 words: 10% and final 8,000 words: 50%) (60%) (Hurdle)
Assessment of laboratory work (20%)

Hurdle requirement:
Requirement of a pass grade on the theory component (literature review worth 10% and final report worth 50%).

Workload requirements

Approximately 36 hours per week of laboratory work and private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A grade point average of at least 70 over 24 points in the Biomedical Science area at 2nd year level.

For Monash students, those enrolled in the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours

Co-requisites

BMS3021 or BMS3042 or by approval of course coordinator.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Yvonne Hodgson

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)
  • Summer semester A 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides the opportunity for high achieving students to work with an academic supervisor and complete a research project in the Biomedical Sciences. The research project may be chosen from a list of projects available at the beginning of semester from any of the Departments in the School of Biomedical Sciences. The unit convenor and supervisor must approve the project topic at the time of enrolment. Students will work in a research laboratory to obtain data, will complete a written preliminary and final report and will give a series of oral presentations on their work.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Review scientific literature in the project area, including the ability to identify key information in this area;
  2. Access databases for provision of information;
  3. Present oral reports;
  4. Construct written reports;
  5. Manage workloads to meet deadlines;
  6. Work with a significant degree of independence;
  7. Plan a large project, including the ability to adjust planning as events and results dictate;
  8. Conduct appropriate statistical analysis of results;
  9. Perform routine laboratory measurements and manipulations;
  10. Maintain efficient and meaningful communication with a project supervisor;
  11. Use technical word processing packages and graphics software.

Assessment

Two oral reports (preliminary 15 minutes: 10% and final 15 minutes: 10%) (20%)
Two written reports (preliminary 1,500 words: 10% and final 8,000 words: 50%) (60%) (Hurdle)
Assessment of laboratory work (20%)

Hurdle requirement:
Requirement of a pass grade on the theory component (literature review worth 10% and final report worth 50%).

Workload requirements

Approximately 12 hours per week of laboratory work and private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A grade point average of at least 70 over 24 points in the Biomedical Science area at 2nd year level.

For Monash students, those enrolled in the following:
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
+ Honours degree of Bachelor of Biomedical Science
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Engineering
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Laws
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Science
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Economics
+ Bachelor of Biomedical Science/Bachelor of Commerce

Co-requisites

BMS3021 or BMS3042 or by approval of course coordinator.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Tim Cole

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester to First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Students undertake a supervised research project involving research of a publishable standard which forms the basis of a thesis presented at the end of the year. As part of the unit students present seminars on their research, and are trained in advanced scientific techniques. Students take part in an oral review of the thesis report. Candidates may commence the Honours year at the beginning of either the first or second semester.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Be able to critically review the scientific literature in their discipline;
  2. Understand the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of a research project;
  3. Be able to execute and analyse an appropriate set of studies;
  4. Be proficient in computer-based data acquisition, analysis, presentation, and word processing;
  5. Be able to write up scientific work in a potentially publishable way;
  6. Show communication skills in both oral and written presentation to a scientific audience;
  7. Have acquired a range of technical skills appropriate to their discipline;
  8. Have the capability to perform a variety of scientific procedures and techniques that are essential to the satisfactory completion and reporting of a research project;
  9. Have the ability to pursue higher studies in selected disciplines of biomedical science; and
  10. Have gained insight into the breadth and diversity of the biomedical sciences.

Assessment

Literature review (10%)
Seminars (10%)
Research report (80%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A distinction level average in 24 credit points at third year level, including at least 12 points in 3rd year BMS units.

Co-requisites

BMS4200 and must be enrolled in course 3418.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Tim Cole

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester to First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit aims to develop analytical abilities and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in specific areas of Biomedical Science. Students will undertake a module of statistics relevant to scientific hypothesis testing and provide a written critique of a scientific article. Students will also undertake a component of work within their selected discipline that is unrelated to their specific research component and involves some level of advanced theoretical training. Candidates may commence at the beginning of either first or second semester.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Critically review the scientific literature in their discipline;
  2. Explain the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of a research project;
  3. Recognise the breadth of statistical tests and their applicability to common research methodologies;
  4. Apply simple statistical tests.

Assessment

Statistical test (30%)
Written critique (30%)
Discipline specific component (40%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A distinction level average in 24 points at third year level, including at least 12 points in 3rd year BMS units.

Co-requisites

BMS4100 and must be enrolled in course 3418.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Simone Gibson

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit uses chronic disease as the foundation and basis for dietetic students to develop and extend their core dietetic practice skills and build on what they have learnt in BND3102.

Students are able to apply their skills within the academic setting in a case based learning approach and via experience in the healthcare setting which includes a 3 week individual case management placement. Students will also extend their foundation skills in evaluating evidence and applied research methods applying to nutrition and dietetic practice.

The key themes explored in this unit are: Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice, Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Extend knowledge of the role of diet and relevant non dietary factors in the aetiology, prevention, and management of disease incorporating into practice
  2. Synthesise and communicate to peers key findings from the scientific literature and their relevance and application to nutrition and dietetic practice
  3. Conduct nutrition assessments and formulate dietetic practice recommendations and management strategies using an evidence based approach
  4. Practice individual case management in a simulated and healthcare setting
  5. Practice safely and professionally as part of a healthcare team working towards the National Competency Standards for Dieticians in Australia (as defined by DAA)
  6. Communicate appropriately and broadly using a range of methods extending into the healthcare environment
  7. Extend teamwork skills in the academic and practice settings
  8. Reflect on practice and evaluate self and peers.

Fieldwork

Students are required to complete an Individual Case Management placement experience to successfully fulfil the requirements for this unit. The placement is for a total of 3 weeks in Weeks 10-12 at the same placement partner network the student has been orientated to in BND3102 in Weeks 1-6 of semester.

Assessment

Assignments (35%)
Exam (3 hours) (35%)
Evidence based cases (1 formative, 2 summative) (30%)

Workload requirements

This unit will run over Weeks 7-12 of semester with an average of 48 hours per week allocated including contact and private study hours. The majority of time allocated will be contact hours/placement hours with remaining time for private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 96 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Coordinator. A student must successfully complete BND3102 in order to commence with BND3101.

Co-requisites

BND3102 and must be enrolled in courses 3404 or 4530.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Simone Gibson

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit uses chronic disease as the foundation and basis for dietetic students to develop their core dietetic practice assessment skills whilst learning and applying core knowledge of chronic disease related to nutrition and dietetic practice. There is an emphasis and focus on person centred care and simulation provides a key platform for learning in this unit. A formative and summative Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) sits within this unit to assess students readiness for placement. Students are introduced to the healthcare system and a range of health care settings via a one day/week placement for part of the semester. Food service competencies (Operating Systems and Menu standards) are introduced and integrated practical experiences in the healthcare environment supports learning across this domain.

The key themes explored in this unit are Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice, Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease, Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the role of diet in the aetiology, prevention, and management of major lifestyle related chronic disease.
  2. Apply and integrate knowledge of chronic disease into nutrition assessment and management plans using case based learning, simulation and placement experience in the healthcare environment.
  3. Develop and extend core dietetic practice skills - including interpretation of data, collection and analysis of dietary data, nutrition assessment and intervention strategies.
  4. Develop working knowledge and experience in a healthcare setting to begin practicing safely and professionally.
  5. Apply food service, food science and food system knowledge to individuals and healthcare settings.
  6. Communicate appropriately and broadly using a range of methods.
  7. Extend teamwork skills in the academic and practice settings.
  8. Reflect on their practice and extend self-awareness, insight and cultural competency.

Fieldwork

Students will undertake an embedded placement experience within a healthcare setting of one of the key placement providers for Monash University Department of Nutrition and Dietetics. This will be a total of 4 days in Weeks 1-6 of the semester, which includes 2 days specifically related to food service experience. The aim of this embedded placement is to orientate and familiarise students to the healthcare environment including medical history documentation, following patient journeys, observing healthcare teams, practice linked to chronic disease and food service operating systems.

Assessment

Summative OSCE (25%)
Written exam (35%)
Assignments (40%)

Workload requirements

This unit will run over Weeks 1-6 of semester with an average of 48 hours per week allocated including contact and private study hours. The majority of time allocated will be contact hours with remaining time for private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 96 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Coordinator.

Co-requisites

BND3101 and must be enrolled in courses 3404 or 4530.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Jorja Collins

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is focussed on extending students' food composition, food therapeutic and food systems knowledge to support dietetic practice with integration and application in the practical and placement setting. There is extension of students' research and problem solving skills in managing placement based food service challenges. Students' personal and professional competencies are further developed. This unit supports fulfilment of prescribed competencies as outlined by the Dieticians Association of Australia.

The teaching and learning strategies will encompass lectures, group teaching, tutorials, practical sessions, self-directed learning and a placement based project.

The key themes explored in this unit are Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems and Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease, coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Integrate food composition and practical food knowledge to a range of therapeutic applications to support dietetic practice
  2. Compare and contrast food service systems across healthcare settings including key regulatory and accreditation systems relevant to food service management.
  3. Develop and communicate plans to provide safe and nutritious food in food service settings
  4. Implement, evaluate and disseminate results of activities that support delivery of quality nutrition and food standards within a food service
  5. Apply research practice skills and innovative problem solving to food service management challenges
  6. Apply the principles of management in food service including organisational management, human resource management and production management
  7. Utilise reflection, professional and personal communication and teamwork skills.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 15 days.

Assessment

Project report (3,500 words) (Group) (35%)
Oral presentation (10 minutes) (Group) (10%)
Food therapeutic manual (2,500 words) (25%)
Training module for food service/health care staff (Individual oral presentation) (20 minutes) (15%)
Placement portfolio including guided reflection (2,000 words) (15%)
Professional Behaviour Appraisal Form (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

12 hours/week plus 15 day placement for project and 5 day project write up/presentation = additional 20 days at 8 hours/day. Average over semester = 22.3 hours/week plus self study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 120 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Coordinator.

Co-requisites

BND3302 and must be enrolled in courses 3404 or 4530.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Ms Janeane Dart

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit uses a range of clinical conditions and diseases as the foundation and basis for dietetic students to:

  • further develop their core dietetic practice skills and
  • develop skills in dietetic education and case management in the academic setting in preparation for placement.

There is an emphasis and focus on person centred care and using simulation and case based learning to provide a key platform for learning in this unit. Preparing students for individual case management clinical placement is a key focus of this unit.

Broader issues regarding healthcare systems and healthcare provision, management, ethics in healthcare and quality improvement are covered in this unit. Students' professional competencies are further developed and this unit supports fulfilment of prescribed competencies as outlined by the Dieticians Association of Australia.

The key themes explored in this unit are Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease, coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Examine the role of diet in the aetiology, prevention, and management of a range of clinical conditions and diseases in preparation for clinical case management
  2. Apply and integrate knowledge of science and disease into nutrition assessment and management of clinical cases including consideration of broader issues regarding healthcare systems and provision, management, ethics and quality improvement
  3. Progress core skills in the clinical dietetic process towards case management including prioritisation and discharge planning
  4. Integrate personal, social, clinical, cultural, physiological, ethical, environmental and economic factors into clinical reasoning and decision making in case management
  5. Apply an evidence based approach to clinical case management
  6. Identify and critically review evidence in clinical dietetics communicating practice applications
  7. Incorporate theories of behaviour change and learning theory in counselling and education skills to support effective dietetic case management
  8. Communicate appropriately and broadly using a range of methods both written and oral
  9. Reflect on practice extending self-awareness, insight and cultural competency linking to professionalism.

Assessment

Exam (1 hour MCQ/EMQ mid semester exam and 3 hours exam) (40%) (Hurdle)
Case based portfolio (including guided reflection & evidence based education resource) (Individual) (6,000 words) (50%)
Self-developed placement resource (10%)

Workload requirements

24 hours/week contact time for week 1-9 plus self study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 120 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Coordinator.

Co-requisites

BND3202 and must be enrolled in courses 3404 or 4530.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Claire Palermo

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will be classroom based and develop student's knowledge of the foundations of public health and public health nutrition as a discipline. Students will explore the role of population nutritional intake and its relationship to health and the strategies and approaches at a population level that are effective in improving health, including legislation, policy, social marketing, community development, health education and screening. The focus of content will be on the practical application of the principles, theories and processes used to develop population based approaches to improving health through nutrition, with a focus on capacity building. This unit will prepare students for a practical placement in public health nutrition (BND4092).

The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 2: Determinants and influences on population health and nutrition coupled with partial integration of content from Theme 4: Food: from science to systems.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the key health and nutrition issues affecting the Australian population and the political, environmental, social and economic determinants of these.
  2. Apply the key steps in the public health nutrition intervention cycle and explain the importance of integrating capacity building within this framework.
  3. Evaluate the role of public health policy in shaping public health nutrition practice.
  4. Analyse the continuum of population based approaches for addressing nutrition issues and evaluate the level of evidence of effectiveness in improving health.
  5. Evaluate a socio-ecological, systems based, approach to understanding and managing population nutrition issues.
  6. Differentiate between effective and non-effective public health advocacy approaches.

Assessment

Group project proposal (4 students) (2,000 words equivalent) (30%)
Group oral presentation (20 minutes) plus 5 minutes discussion and debate (20%)
Individual discussion paper (3,000 words equivalent) (50%) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

Week 1: 3 workshops x 4 hours per day = 12 hours
Week 2-12: 3 hours per week face to face teaching and learning sessions supported by group work and self-directed learning and an additional 12 hours per week of self-study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 144 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Coordinator.

Co-requisites

BND4092 and BND students only.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Claire Palermo

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is predominantly a fieldwork experience that will challenge students to integrate their academic training and to synthesise knowledge into a practical public health nutrition project based in a community setting. The unit requires students to manage a project that addresses a public health nutrition issue. Students will participate in program planning within a work environment and provide tangible benefit to their participating organisation. Students will be responsible for designing a project, collection and analysis of data and synthesis of findings into a report. Principles of information evaluation, workload management, communication, teamwork and responsibility for project management will also be developed.

The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply the social, environmental, economic and political determinants of nutrition status to a priority public health nutrition area.
  2. Plan, implement and evaluate systems based, population health approaches and solutions to priority nutrition issues.
  3. Apply the research process using appropriate methods of collection and analysis for both qualitative and quantitative data.
  4. Contribute to an evidence-based, population approach to improve population nutrition health in a community setting.
  5. Advocate for policy change to benefit health and nutrition outcomes for populations.
  6. Employ critical and scientific writing and communication skills to document and report findings to professional and scientific audiences.
  7. Practice professional leadership to promote the role of nutrition.
  8. Establish effective working partnerships, networks, collaborations with a range of team members and stakeholders.
  9. Adopt a questioning and critical approach in all aspects of practice and evaluate practice on an on-going basis.
  10. Achieve entry level competencies to support community and public health nutrition practice.

Fieldwork

30 hours per week for 7 weeks plus an additional 2 days site/project orientation.

Assessment

Project report (Group) (50% which includes 10% weighing from Individual Peer Assessment and formative peer assessment) (Hurdle)
Poster presentation (Individual) (20%)
Objective structured oral exam (30%) (Hurdle)
Practical competency (300 hours work-based learning) must complete to pass standard to pass the unit
Professional Behaviour Appraisal based on 300 hours placement (Ungraded) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

30 hours practicum per week for 9 weeks.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

NUT4082 and must be enrolled in courses 3404, 4530 or 3956.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Ms Cate Lombard

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit extends students' integrated knowledge and skills with application to strategic practice problems and scenarios. This unit prepares students to enter the profession and the workforce and completes the final stage of students' research skill development.

The key theme in this unit is Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice. As this unit is pulling together many of the final dietetic competencies, there is partial integration of content and application from the other themes, Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition, Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease and Theme 4: Food from Science to systems with research underpinning all of these themes.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Critically review nutrition and dietetic practice, identifying gaps in knowledge and apply valid and relevant conclusions and recommendations for practice improvement.
  2. Utilise research, leadership, communication (including negotiation, advocacy and conflict resolution) and management principles and skills in approaching solutions to practice problems.
  3. Work effectively as a member of a team creating innovative solutions to nutrition and dietetics practice problems.
  4. Apply the principles of human resource management, budgeting and risk management to project management and research.
  5. Synthesise and analyse information/data collected from practice and communicate scientifically.
  6. Plan and evaluate own personal and professional development in preparation for entry into the profession.

Assessment

Scientific paper (Quantitative project 4000 words / Qualitative project 5000 words) (50%) (Hurdle)
Peer review (1,000 words) (5%)
Small grant proposal (2,000 words) (20%)
Group oral presentation (20 mins) & questions (10%)
Group Report (2,500 words) (15%)
Attendance and participation (Hurdle)
Professional practice (Ungraded hurdle)

Workload requirements

This 12 credit point unit requires an equivalent of 24 hours per week of study including contact and private study hours. This unit will be front loaded at the beginning of the semester and towards the end of semester Week 10-12 with an intensive teaching block. The remaining time during semester is allocated for self-directed learning and private study to progress learning in the unit during the clinical placement. A significant amount of learning is self-directed and autonomous in this unit.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 168 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Coordinator.

Co-requisites

BND students only.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Ms Simone Gibson

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is predominantly a placement based unit to support students' progression and entry level competencies in individual case management in a healthcare setting.

The key themes explored in this unit are Theme 3: Fundamentals of Health and Disease, Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 4: Food from Science to Systems as students' progress and integrate their dietetic practice skills and competencies working in the healthcare environment. There is partial integration of content and application from Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge of science, nutrition, diet and disease into assessment, education, and management of clinical cases in a healthcare environment
  2. Integrate personal, social, clinical, cultural, dietary, economic, environmental, ethical, medical and physiological factors into clinical reasoning and decision making in client centred case management in the healthcare environment
  3. Achieve entry level competencies to support individual case management across a range of clients
  4. Apply an evidence based approach to clinical case management
  5. Integrate knowledge of food service systems and processes into case management
  6. Exhibit excellent oral and written communication skills in all professional interactions with peers, colleagues, clients and other stakeholders in the healthcare and academic environments.
  7. Work effectively as a member of the dietetic and broader healthcare team
  8. Practice safely, effectively and professionally
  9. Reflect on practice extending self-awareness, insight and cultural competency.

Fieldwork

Each student will be allocated to a healthcare site of a placement partner of Monash University and the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics for a total of 36 placement days. University staff are involved in final placement assessment and signing off of entry level competency for the profession for the relevant units.

Assessment

Major case oral presentation & extension questions (15 mins) (15%)
Major case written report (3000 words) (45%)
Critical incident related to patient management - guided reflection & action plan (1500 words) (15%)
Ward round interview (30 mins) (10%)
Ward round nutrition care plan report (1,500 words) (15%)
Placement Portfolio (Hurdle) (Pass / Fail)
Practical competencies (Ungraded hurdle)

Workload requirements

Students will spend the majority of time for this unit allocated to a healthcare setting (8 Weeks of either 4 or 5 days per week - a total of 36 days). Students will also be expected to attend tutorials and presentations in the academic setting (scheduled around placement commitments) with the remaining time allocated for private study. Students are expected to attend placement for the equivalent of full time hours (7 hours/day) during their scheduled placement weeks. It is also expected that students undertake private study outside of placement hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

A student must have passed a minimum of 144 credit points of units deemed satisfactory and relevant in content and depth by the Nutrition and Dietetic Department Selection Officer in conjunction with the Unit Coordinator.

Co-requisites

BND students only.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Psychological Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Russell Conduit

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit examines how the chemistry of the nervous system influences behaviour, building on prior knowledge of nervous system function. It addresses the nature of neuronal communication and how neurotransmitters interact with receptors to send signals to other brain cells. Emphasis will be placed on the regulation of homeostasis and behaviour by neurochemicals and hormones. The role of glial cells in controlling key metabolic pathways in the brain will also be reviewed. Lastly, this unit will examine how synaptic plasticity and biochemical changes underpin memory formation.

Outcomes

Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the methods used by the nervous system to exchange information by releasing neurotransmitters and the interaction of these neurochemicals with specific receptors;
  2. Describe how the nervous system regulates the homeostasis of the body and behaviour via neural connections and the release of neurochemicals and hormones from the brain and other organs;
  3. Recognise the role that glial cells have in controlling the biochemical balance of the nervous system and how they protect neurones from stressors and pathogens;
  4. Identify and describe how synaptic function and plasticity are altered through physiological and environmental influences, and how synaptic plasticity and biochemical changes promote memory formation;
  5. Discuss key features of experimental design and methodology that are used in the study of behavioural neuroscience;
  6. Demonstrate skills in the use of data analysis software to accurately analyse and report experimental data.
  7. Demonstrate careful observation and documentation in experimental work;
  8. Evaluate the importance of scientific findings and interpret and discuss these findings in written presentations.

Assessment

Mid-semester examination (2 hours) (30%)
End-semester examination (2 hours) (30%)
Practical reports (3 reports of 1,000 words) (30%)
Blackboard quiz on research design and ethics (10%)

Workload requirements

3 hours lectures, 2 hours practical or equivalent, 7 additional hours per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prohibitions

BNS3031, BNS3041, PSY3280.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Psychological Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Professor Shantha Rajaratnam

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

Following a brief examination of philosophical views of awareness and consciousness, the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie changes in awareness are examined. The modes of action, brain regions targeted and effects on cognition and behaviour of clinical, prescribed and recreational drugs are discussed. They are compared with other altered states of awareness, in particular circadian rhythms and sleep. The notion that awareness results from the integration of cellular activity in the brain and that subtle changes in this pattern of activity can dramatically alter awareness, cognition and behaviour, is emphasised.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the neurobiological modes of action of the major classes of drugs, and their different effects on awareness, cognition and behaviour;
  2. Understand that awareness results from the integration of cellular activity in the brain, and that subtle changes in this pattern of activity can dramatically alter awareness, cognition and behaviour; and
  3. Appreciate that addictive behaviour has a strong neurobiological basis, and the ethical and social implications of drug use and abuse.

Additional objectives involve fostering research and presentation skills that will be useful to graduates of Behavioural Neuroscience. To this end, student at the completion of the course will have:

  1. Acquired experience in a variety of laboratory-based research paradigms and demonstrated a satisfactory level of competence in obtaining and interpreting scientific data and its presentation in written reports;
  2. Acquired skills and experience in electronic data acquisition and the presentation of reports using modern techniques of information technology; and
  3. Developed experience in self-directed group work and the instruction of others.

Assessment

Mid-semester written theory examination (short answer and/or MCQ, 2 hour) (35%)
End of semester written theory examination (short answer and/or MCQ, 2 hour) (35%)
Short practical report (maximum 500 words) (5%)
Laboratory report (2,000 words) (25%)

Workload requirements

5 contact hours, 7 additional hours per week (or 3 contact hours + 9 additional hours on alternate weeks).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prohibitions

PSY3102, PSY3280.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Psychological Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Glenn Melvin

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit examines common neurological conditions that result in behavioural dysfunction, and imaging techniques that can assist their diagnosis. The first five weeks examine the applications, limitations and theoretical bases of X-ray imaging, CT, angiography, PET, MRI, FMRI, SPECT, EEG and MEG. The remainder investigates the neurobiological correlates of traumatic brain injury, brain tumours, epilepsies, cerebrovascular disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and Fragile X Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS). Emphasis will be placed on the impact of these disorders on behaviour and cognition, their diagnosis and treatment, and on aspects of patient care.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Be familiar with the variety of neuroimaging techniques that are available, and understand the theoretical basis for these technologies and their practical limitations;
  2. Understand how imaging techniques can assist the diagnosis of some neurological disorders, and be able to interpret some of the features revealed by these images;
  3. Understand the neurobiological correlates of some common neurological disorders and how they are diagnosed and treated;
  4. Understand the behavioural and cognitive deficits that accompany some neurological disorders;
  5. Appreciate the impact of disorders and their treatment from the point of view of patients and their carers;
  6. Have developed confidence in communicating effectively with clinicians, patients and their carers; and
  7. Have acquired the ability of writing case reports based on clinical evaluation and interview with patients.

Assessment

Mid-semester written theory examination (short answer and/or MCQ, 2 hours) (30%)
End of semester written theory examination (MCQ, 2 hours) (40%)
Multi-disciplinary neuroimaging assignment (15%)
Patient case reports (15%)

Workload requirements

3 hours of lectures per week (1 x 2 hour; 1 x 1 hour), plus one 2 hour laboratory fortnightly. 6 additional hours per week of study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Psychological Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Antonio Verdejo-Garcia

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The aims of the Honours year in behavioural neuroscience are to increase students understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of research, develop their analytic, research and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in specific areas of the discipline including laboratory techniques and other research-related skills. The unit is also designed to prepare students for higher degree studies. The relatively high weighting of this unit reflects the intensity of taking on a major research project in this field. In this unit students may undertake one major project or two separate, though typically closely-related, research projects in an area within behavioural neuroscience. The project(s) will provide training in both discipline specific and generic research skills and form the basis of an honours research thesis presented at the end of the year.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Be able to critically review the scientific literature in their domain of behavioural neuroscience research,
  2. Have acquired sound knowledge of the processes involved in research design, development and implementation through the completion of a research project,
  3. Be able to execute and analyse the outcomes of a laboratory-based and/or field-based study,
  4. Be proficient in the use of computer-based analysis, data-base, presentation, word processing and data-base/internet search engine software,
  5. Be able to prepare a report of a research project in a potentially publishable way,
  6. Show communication skills in both oral and written presentations to both audiences who are specialists in the student's field of study of research and non-specialist scientific audience,
  7. Have acquired a range of technical skills appropriate to their research area,
  8. Have the capability to perform a variety of scientific procedures and techniques that are essential to the satisfactory completion and reporting of a research project.

Assessment

Research proposal (1,500 words) (10%)
Honours research thesis (12,000 - 15,000 words) (80%)
Communication of results (Oral) (5%)
Graduate attribute assessment (5%)

Hurdle: Students must pass the thesis to achieve a pass for this unit.

Workload requirements

42 hours/week on their research project. Six 2-3 hour seminars/workshops.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Psychological Sciences

Coordinator(s)

Dr Katrina Simpson

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The aim of this unit is to provide students with a thorough understanding in statistical concepts to enable them to be informed in their chosen field. The unit begins with a review of univariate statistics and an introduction to the philosophy of research design and analysis. More advanced statistical techniques are then systematically introduced. There is a focus on the understanding of the issues that may arise around the choice of appropriate statistical technique and preparation of data, critiquing decisions made to assist in the interpretation of findings. The content will be set in a context of the needs of professional psychologists and researchers whose interests present unusual methodological demands, which in turn may influence choices in research approach and statistical technique.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe a range of methodological and philosophical principles in research design, analysis and interpretation.
  2. Describe, apply and evaluate research designs and analyses used by psychologists.
  3. Apply scientific research principles to data in practice.
  4. Critique data with a view to preparation, analysis and interpretation.
  5. Operate SPSS and AMOS packages to analyse data for analysis.
  6. Critique and record decisions made in the process of research examples distinguishing between fact and inference in sets of analyses.

Assessment

Assessment (MCQ) (10%)
Research workbook part A (1,200 words) (15%)
Research workbook part B (3,000 words) (40%)
Exam (2 hours) (35%)

Workload requirements

2 hours per week of lectures and 2 hours per fortnight for SPSS/AMOS training in labs. In addition, there will be 2 hours dedicated in the alternate fortnight with online instruction on the analytical technique delivered through the lecture. This will entail collaboration with other students and feedback provided through the lecturer. The expected undirected/private study to be completed by students will be approximately 8 hours a week. This will incorporate students recording weekly analyses in a prepared lab book, readings (text and supplementary material), preparation and cleaning of data for analysis for the upcoming tutorials, preparation and completion of the major assessment as well exams in Week 5 and the end of semester.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

BNS4100 and must be enrolled in course 3514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Terry-Ann Davies

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit examines the current and evolving role of the paramedic within communities both locally and international with a specific focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of health communication. In addition to this, an understanding of paramedic specific legal, ethical and professional requirements will be explored. The importance of self-care and wellness for paramedics, who work in a very dynamic field and have to be able to deal with adverse and often potentially dangerous situations, will be addressed.

Using a combination of lectures, case-based learning, fieldwork and simulation, students will focus primarily on theoretical approaches that examine communication and communication practice in contemporary society. Clinical scenarios will be utilised to study potential communication, legal and cultural considerations that can be observed in the pre-hospital setting.

Finally, applying the theoretical bases, students will develop essential clinical interview skills and apply them appropriately to various situations. Students will integrate these skills into a clinical problem solving and decision-making model to accurately and safely assess and manage common health emergencies.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify and use professional language and behaviours appropriate for a paramedic in the pre-hospital setting.
  2. Describe legal, ethical and professional issues as they relate to paramedic practice.
  3. Explain the barriers to effective communication within paramedic practice and how these can impact on patient care.
  4. Identify models of communication and apply these to patient-centred interviews.
  5. Contrast the diverse pre-hospital needs of different community groups.
  6. Recognise the importance of wellbeing and self care for paramedics.

Fieldwork

Students will be required to complete 4 placement days within a local aged care or community facility.

Assessment

Communication & professionalism self-reflection (1,200 words / 300 words per placement) (20%)
Case study: Exploring ethical, communication & cultural issues (2,500 words) (30%)
Values exchange: Ethical dilemma in paramedic practice (10%)
End of semester examination (40%)
Practical examination: Patient centred interview & communication (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)
Community placement (32 hours) (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

On-campus: 6 hours per week involving lectures, workshops, fieldwork, tutorials, simulation, and small group exercises. An additional 6 hours of private study is required.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Emergency health - paramedic practice

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course code 3445 or M20021


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice

Coordinator(s)

Ms Jaime Wallis

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit explores the foundation of the paramedic clinician and introduces the roles expected of paramedics as clinicians. The unit will utilise a model of paramedic clinical competence as a framework to develop the foundations and skills of clinical approach, clinical problem solving, and clinical decision-making. The essential clinical skills will be developed in the clinical laboratory and simulation settings. A satisfactory level in all these essential clinical skills will be required before students can proceed with their course. The context of paramedic clinical practice will be provided by supervised clinical experience with emergency ambulance services.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a standardised clinical approach to the assessment and care of patients in the community.
  2. Identify and describe communication theories that are relevant to paramedic practice.
  3. Identify barriers to effective communication and patient assessment that are relevant to paramedic practice.
  4. Examine professional and teamwork behaviours pertinent to paramedic practice.
  5. Develop the ability to reflect and evaluate individual performance in the clinical setting.
  6. Demonstrate appropriate professional behaviours and develop the ability to provide constructive peer feedback within the simulated learning environment.
  7. Discuss and demonstrate the appropriate and safe use of manual handling practices and equipment whilst caring for patients.

Assessment

Mid-semester test (1 hour) (20%)
Clinical portfolio (30%) (Hurdle)
Written exam (2 hours) (50%)
Objective Structured Clinical Examination (Pass / Fail)

Hurdle requirements: To pass this unit the student must complete the clinical portfolio at the pass grade AND pass the written examination AND pass the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. 80% attendance at tutorials is mandatory to pass this unit.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week involving lectures, tutorials, simulation, clinical laboratory and small group exercises.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course code 3445, 3892 or M20021


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Rural Health Churchill

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Shane Bullock

Offered

Gippsland

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit reflects an introduction to the four themes of the MBBS curriculum: Theme I (Personal and Professional Development), Theme II (Society, Population, Health and Illness), Theme III (Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice) and Theme IV (Clinical Skills). Students begin to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes required by a medical student. Knowledge in the basic medical and behavioural sciences is developed within inter-disciplinary units related to clinical and other problems through problem based learning clinical case studies. Clinical skills development introduces history-taking, physical examination and procedural skills through clinical skills tutorials and clinical placement activities. Community partnership placements are also a part of the unit.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify and develop strategies for their own health enhancement.
  2. Examine the similarities and differences between ethical issues in personal and professional life.
  3. Appreciate the legal framework within which medical practice operates and the legal basis of the doctor-patient relationship.
  4. Differentiate ethical debates about the following: doctor-patient relation; health and illness; ideas of personhood and body.
  5. Apply concepts of professional responsibility and public accountability with reference to the role of the courts and common law statutes and professional self-regulation.
  6. Develop a perspective on issues of social equity, welfare, advocacy and justice, particularly as they relate to the practice of medicine.
  7. Demonstrate that from their position of responsibility within the community they have knowledge and skills that can contribute to the well-being of those people who are disadvantaged.
  8. Develop the concept of the 'whole person' and in particular, the social and economic context of health and illness.
  9. Discuss different perspectives on health, illness and medical practice through application of the 'sociological imagination'.
  10. Describe associations between health and illness and social influences such as culture, disability, place, rurality, social position, gender, ethnicity, ecology and access to healthcare.
  11. Consider appropriate adaptations of healthcare practice to suit particular cultural and social circumstances.
  12. Demonstrate basic skills in accessing and critiquing research materials from personal, print and electronic sources.
  13. Discuss the basic concepts and methods of biostatistics in medical research and epidemiology.
  14. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different epidemiological study designs.
  15. Explain how rural diversity can impact on rural health, illness and health service delivery.
  16. Articulate the relationship between data, information, evidence, knowledge and informed care.
  17. Demonstrate in applied situations the following:
    • Enhanced information technology skills (searching and medical database identification skills, including computer presentation skills);
    • Application of critical skills to clinical and research questions;
    • Application of a range of knowledge based systems in clinical practice (bibliographic software, decision support systems).
  18. Discuss the theories and approaches to health promotion.
  19. Participate in the basic health promotion process of program development, planning, implementation and evaluation.
  20. Identify appropriate strategies for health promotion interventions including targeting high risk and population-based strategies.
  21. Recognise the conceptual and practical implications of a Community Based Practice program.
  22. Describe and discuss the health, illness and community services and facilities available in a rural, regional and outer urban location.
  23. Describe normal cell and tissue structure and formation.
  24. Identify the role of genes in health and disease.
  25. Describe the immune system and immune responses in health and disease.
  26. Discuss the pathophysiology and management of conditions caused by microbes.
  27. Describe the pathophysiology of neoplasia.
  28. Discuss the general principles, concepts and language of neuroscience that will provide a basis for understanding the neural control of body systems and neurology.
  29. Outline the structure and functions of neurons, signalling mechanisms, drug actions and receptors, and the organisation, inter relationship and general function of all divisions of the nervous system.
  30. Describe the function of peripheral sensory systems, the sensory pathways, the motor pathways and the importance of sensory feedback.
  31. Explain the general and detailed organisation and function of the musculoskeletal system.
  32. Discuss the theories associated with human psychology and describe the neurobiological basis of human behaviour.
  33. Describe the structure and function of the healthy cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal and reproductive systems and the formation and function of blood.
  34. Describe the general pharmacological principles and the mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents commonly prescribed to combat disorders of the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, reproductive systems.
  35. Describe the mechanisms and effects of selected common pathologies affecting the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, reproductive system.
  36. Describe the basic processes of reproduction and early development, comprehend infertility and strategies to manage reproduction and contraception.
  37. Discuss how fetal conditions can determine adult disease, recognising how specific anomalies can be diagnosed prenatally and how some of them may be corrected or managed.
  38. Describe the trajectory of human development and explain the normal growth pattern and the attendant nutritional requirements of individuals from birth to adulthood.
  39. Demonstrate clear and appropriate communication skills and active learning with clarity, consideration and sensitivity to patients and other health professionals.
  40. Describe the framework for taking a comprehensive medical history.
  41. Demonstrate an awareness of basic ethical and legal issues when communicating with patients.
  42. Describe the principles of clinical reasoning.
  43. Describe the elements of a Mental State Examination and perform a Mini Mental State examination.
  44. Recognise the importance of context in medical history taking and the development of health conditions.
  45. Apply a framework for taking a focused medical history in the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, reproductive, haematological and endocrine systems.
  46. Apply a framework for taking a sexual history using a patient centred, non-judgemental approach.
  47. Perform a basic examination of the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, haematological and endocrine system using a systematic patient-centred approach.
  48. Perform a systematic patient-centred examination of the breast recognising the importance of communication during intimate examinations.
  49. Demonstrate a structured approach to describing the features of normal basic investigations including Chest X-ray, Abdominal X-ray and 12 lead electrocardiograph.
  50. Describe the elements of the patient safety framework including hand hygiene, teamwork and communication.
  51. Demonstrate a structured and empathic approach to dealing with emotion in the patient encounter in a simulated environment.
  52. Perform a series of procedural skills in a simulated environment using patient centred communication.
  53. Recognise the social and health needs of Indigenous communities in urban, rural and remote locations.
  54. Discuss traditional Indigenous culture and the complexities of contemporary Indigenous societies in urban, rural and remote locations.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Attendance (80% mandatory class attendance) (Hurdle)
Professionalism and engagement (7.5%)
Clinical skills competencies (5%)
Critical reflection on a learning experience (5%)
Mid-semester 1 examination (5%)
Community-Based Placement (CBP) program assignment (7.5%)
End-of-semester 1 written examination (3 hours) (10%)
Population health assignment (5%)
HHB / HLSD assignment (5%)
End-of-year summative OSCE (20%)
End-of-semester 2 written examination (10%)
Vertically Integrated Assessment (VIA) examination (20%)

Workload requirements

On-campus: Class contact hours: 24 hours per week. Students would be expected to do a minimum of 24 hours private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Must be enrolled in course 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Rural Health Churchill

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Shane Bullock

Offered

Gippsland

  • Second semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

GMA2000 provides an overall result for Year A Graduate entry MBBS based upon achievement in GMA1010 and includes the Vertically Integrated Assessment (VIA) examination undertaken at the end of Year A. Teaching and learning activities for GMA1010 have been outlined in the relevant unit approvals and student results for each of these units will contribute to the result for GMA2000.

Outcomes

GMA2000 is a hurdle requirement for successful completion of the Graduate entry MBBS course. Upon successful completion of this unit, students should have demonstrated the necessary integration of knowledge and skills developed during Year A of the medicine course.

Assessment

GMA1010 (80%)
VIA examination (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 3952 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Dragan Ilic

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the skills necessary to locate, critique, interpret and summarise relevant evidence. This will provide a solid foundation for an evidence-based approach to optimising health and well-being at a population level.

Students are guided through skills in searching for and locating evidence. They are introduced to different research methodologies and ways of analysing data to understand various research paradigms. This information is used to critique the available literature.

Students will be introduced to both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis; basic descriptive statistics; measurement concepts; and synthesis and reporting of data.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe different sources of evidence and their roles in health practice.
  2. Construct and implement effective strategies for searching the health literature.
  3. Describe quantitative and qualitative techniques for data collection and basic analysis for reporting data.
  4. Assess risk of bias across quantitative research designs.
  5. Recognise issues of cultural context and ethical principles in data collection and interpretation.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to summarise and communicate evidence for professional audiences.

Assessment

Oral group presentation (20 minutes) (15%)
Online quiz (30 minutes) (10%)
Evidence-based practice (EBP) case simulation (1,800 words) (30%)
Examination (MCQ & short answer questions) (2 hours) (45%)

Hurdle requirement:
80% attendance at tutorials and participation in online tasks.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week contact hours plus 6 hours per week private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following courses: M20021, M20022, M20023, M20024, 3882, 3870, 4503, 3445.

Prohibitions

HSC1061, PHH1061.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Michaela Riddell

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

In this unit, we ask you to think about the vast and growing inequities in health that exist across the world and the challenges for people living in developing countries. We explore their underlying causes including: globalisation, transnational trade, tourism, rapid development, social and political transitions, climate change, violence and insecurity. Using research reports and field experience from practical projects, we examine the wider context for working in international settings as well as the issues faced by Indigenous peoples, migrants and refugees. We explore our responsibilities as 'global citizens' and we challenge you to think about ways you could make a difference.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the place of health and its social determinants in a globalising world;
  2. Compare and contrast initiatives to address global health challenges;
  3. Identify opportunities for action using relevant approaches to global health challenges;
  4. Identify future global health challenges and their determinants;
  5. Analyse the social determinants of global health; and
  6. Critically reflect on contemporary debates regarding globalization and health.

Assessment

Group presentation (30%)
Class test (1 hour) (30%)
Assignment (3,000 words) (40%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at tutorials.

Workload requirements

6 contact hours (1 hour lecture, 2 hour tutorial, and 3 hours online activity) plus 6 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Darshini Ayton

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides an introduction to the principles and practices of contemporary public health. Case study examples are used to illustrate public health successes, including the key elements contributing to these successful approaches.

Key concepts introduced include population health, social determinants of health, health inequalities, health and human rights, and the core roles and functions of public health systems, policies and programs.

Inequalities within and across national boundaries are explored, as well as the contributing factors to these inequalities. Public health priorities are explored through consideration of population health trends and vulnerable populations.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the principles underpinning public health practice.
  2. Identify a range of public health interventions and compare their strengths and limitations.
  3. Discuss how behavioural, social and cultural, environmental and political determinants contribute to health outcomes.
  4. Explain the causes and consequences of health inequalities.
  5. Summarise information from relevant high quality public health sources.

Assessment

Online quiz (30 minutes) (10%)
Written essay (1,800 words) (30%)
Group oral presentation (20 minutes) (15%)
Examination (MCQ, short answer and essay questions) (2 hours) (45%)

Hurdle requirement:
80% attendance at tutorials and participation in online tasks.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week contact hours plus 6 hours per week private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following courses: M20021, M20022, M20023, M20024, 3882, 3870, 4503, 3445.

Prohibitions

HSC1081, PHH1081.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Anna Vlahandonis and Dr Basia Diug

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides an introduction to the course of disease for common health conditions, and their impact on individuals and populations.

The unit outlines different types of disease, and explores common diseases from pathophysiological, psychosocial, and epidemiological perspectives. The course of disease, and contributing and risk factors at the individual and social levels are explored, as well as the consequences for individuals, health systems, and society.

Particular conditions considered will vary but will include diseases across the communicable, non-communicable, acute, chronic and degenerative conditions.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the biological basis of selected human health and disease.
  2. Describe the pathophysiology and course of disease for selected human diseases.
  3. Identify the social and individual factors contributing to selected human disease.
  4. Explain the consequences of selected human diseases for health systems, society and epidemiology.
  5. Critically appraise a current topic in human health and disease using relevant, high quality sources.
  6. Develop organisational and communication skills in a small team environment.

Assessment

Group presentation (15 minutes) (10%)
Online quizzes (30 minutes) (10%)
Research portfolio (15 minutes oral presentation & 1 page topic summary & 2,500 words report) (35%)
2 x Exams (Mid-semester: 1 hour (10%) & End of year: 2 hours (35%)) (45%)

Hurdle requirement:
80% attendance at tutorials and participation in online tasks.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week contact hours plus 6 hours per week private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following courses: M20021, M20022, M20023, M20024, 3445.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kerri Whittenbury

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will deliver a structured introduction to the Australian healthcare system. Students will gain a preliminary knowledge of the organization, current policies and policy debates, funding arrangements and emerging trends in healthcare practice. A feature of the unit is an inclusive approach to the understanding of health. This approach will consider aged care, disability, mental health, and alcohol and drug components in addition to established health services. Case studies will be used on a weekly basis to consolidate the theoretical material. Students will develop a reflective understanding of their own experience of health care, and be able to identify their assumptions regarding health and the practice of health care. Overarching themes will include an overview of the health system, specialist sectors and working in the health space.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the components and organisation of the Australian healthcare system.
  2. Discriminate between polices which inform, and the arrangements which fund, the Australian healthcare system.
  3. Distinguish between the current policy debates and service models relevant to the current Australian healthcare system.
  4. Identify the inter-sectorial and multi-disciplinary components of the Australian healthcare system.
  5. Outline healthcare practices.
  6. Articulate a reflective understanding of their experience and assumptions with respect to health and the practice of care.

Assessment

Interview and written assignment - Study of individual health consumer (1,200 words) (20%)
Group presentation (20 minutes) (20%)
Written case study (1,800 words) (30%)
Examination (MCQ) (2 hours) (30%)

Hurdle requirement:
80% attendance at tutorials and participation in online tasks (allowances will be made for absences if medical certificate etc. is provided).

Workload requirements

6 hours per week contact hours plus 6 hours per week private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following courses: M20021, M20022, M20023, M20024, 3882, 3870, 4503, 3445.

Prohibitions

BME3032, HSC1052, PHH1052.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Evie Kendal

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will explore how individual and population experiences of health are shaped by culture and society. The unit draws on key sociological and anthropological theories and concepts to reveal explanations for health in respect of larger socio-cultural realities and political processes. Students will be encouraged to foster skills in critical deconstruction of Western representations of culture to arrive at an appreciation of various 'ways of knowing', including Indigenous scholarship. There will be a focus on global health and in particular, Indigenous people, place, culture and health.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply key principles of sociological and anthropological thought to the lived experience of individuals and populations
  2. Apply the themes associated with the sociological imagination to examine the social production, construction and organisation of health locally and globally
  3. Apply sociological theories as analytical tools to critically examine cultural, social, political and economic factors influencing health
  4. Critically examine and evaluate aspects of culture and society with which they are familiar (as well as historical representations) in order to extend their understanding of the socio-cultural structures, institutions and processes relevant to health globally.

Assessment

Formative assessment:
Weekly quiz (Weeks 2 to 11)

Summative assessment:
Individual journal (1,200 words) (15%)
Individual analysis of media coverage of a health issue (1,500 words) (30%)
Group presentation of a contentious health issue (15 minutes) (15%)
Individual essay (2,000 words) (40%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at tutorials

Workload requirements

3 contact hours (1 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial), plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1081, HSC1200, HSC1112, PHH1081, PHH1112).

Prohibitions

ATS2717, PBH2003, PHH2022


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Ms Micaela Drieberg

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

In this unit, students will develop knowledge and skills for public health and health promotion program design and implementation. These are core competencies for health promotion practice. Students will develop skills in community needs assessment, determining priorities and defining target populations, and selecting an appropriate mix of strategies based on evidence and theory. Strategies that take into account social and health inequalities will be examined. Students will consider key steps in implementation management and methods for building program sustainability. The relationship between program planning and evaluation will be discussed, to provide students with a foundation for later studies concerning evaluation methods. Case studies, group work, planning tools and evaluations of health promotion programs will be used to develop practical problem-solving skills.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the steps in planning a preventive health program;
  2. Identify data sources for needs assessment and community profiles;
  3. Develop a needs assessment incorporating elements of community profiling as the basis of an evidence-based program plan;
  4. Use published literature and formative research to identify determinants of population health needs that can be changed by health promotion action;
  5. Write SMART project goals and objectives that are clearly linked to health determinants;
  6. Apply a range of theories and evidence to select strategies that will meet project objectives;
  7. Identify administrative and management issues that need to be addressed for successful program implementation;
  8. Select approaches that maximise the potential for program sustainability;
  9. Describe the links between project planning and evaluation and the key steps in evaluation planning.

Assessment

Seminar participation (10%)
Health profile (30%)
Intervention map (40%)
Project implementation plan (20%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at tutorials.

Workload requirements

Workload is 2.5 hour seminar plus 9.5 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1081, HSC1200, PHH1081) AND one of (HSC2101, PHH2101).

Prohibitions

PBH2005, PHH2051


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Ms Micaela Drieberg

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Students will critically analyse the structure, politics and role of the mass media (public relations, news, advertising, advocacy, popular culture) in constructing public health issues. Throughout the unit, students will critically review a range of recent communication campaigns and case studies of contemporary issues. The unit will cover health communication skills for a range of audiences and purposes, including presentation and report writing, developing health communications materials, social marketing, working with the mass media, and advocacy for policies, programs and resources.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss and critically reflect on theoretical models of communication, social change and marketing in relation to health and their application in medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion;
  2. Critically analyse the role of the media in the construction of health issues;
  3. Describe, compare and contrast different approaches to health communication and explain their strengths and limitations;
  4. Critically review a range of local and international health communication campaigns as well as a range of health communication materials (print-based, electronic and web-based);
  5. Identify key stages in designing a communication campaign and apply them to a selected health issue;
  6. Demonstrate oral and written presentation skills for a range of professional and lay audiences including low literate audiences; and
  7. Develop an understanding of the role and principles of public health advocacy in the strategic use of the media and community action to influence decision makers and public opinion.

Assessment

Essay (1.800 words) (30%)
Essay (2,400 words) (40%)
Group oral presentation (20 minutes) (30%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at tutorials.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours (1 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial) plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Ms Cathie Hillman

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Students will gain understanding of the processes involved in community development and building partnerships to improve health, and the theories that underpin them. The unit examines the importance of participation and collective efforts in the social, economic and political life of the community and the contribution this makes to health development. Students will reflect critically on community development theory, concepts of social equity, empowerment, participation and the role of health professionals in community-based practice. Frameworks for community development and partnership building will be examined using a range of Australian and international case studies and current issues.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Define community development and explain the principles which underpin it;
  2. Describe and discuss a range of theories for promoting change in communities and organisations - including their strengths and limitations;
  3. Critically appraise the concepts of social equity, empowerment, participation and engagement, as well as the role of health professionals in community-based practice;
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the role and principles of advocacy in achieving individual and community empowerment;
  5. Explain key stages in developing a community response to a health-related issue;
  6. Identify roles and skills for working collaboratively with community members and a range of stakeholders to create change;
  7. Analyse contemporary issues and debates regarding evaluation of community development approaches.

Assessment

Essay (2,000 - 2,500 words) (30%)
Case study (Oral group presentation) (30%)
Written report (3,000 words) (40%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at seminars.

Workload requirements

3 hour seminar plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1072, HSC2101, PHH2101).


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Charles Livingstone

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit explores key emerging challenges in health at the national and global levels. A case study approach is used to explore current issues facing health systems, including the causes, consequences, and approaches used to address the issues.

Causes are considered at the behavioural, social, cultural, political and environmental levels. A public health and/or systems thinking perspective is taken to describe and critically appraise initiatives to address identified issues.

Specific challenges which will be the focus of this unit will change over time in line with contemporary and emerging issues, but for example may include: obesity, population ageing, climate change, emerging infectious diseases and mental health, terrorism, and natural disasters.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Analyse the behavioural, social and cultural, environmental and political determinants that contribute to selected emerging challenges in health.
  2. Explain and apply the basic principles of a systems thinking approach to emerging health challenges.
  3. Identify and appraise public health principles and approaches to control, prevent or otherwise address selected emerging challenges.
  4. Analyse the implications of selected emerging challenges for the delivery of health care and structure and functions of health systems.
  5. Describe and explain basic risk and emergency management principles.

Assessment

Case study (900 words) (15%)
Group presentation (20 minutes) (20%)
Critical appraisal (1,500 words) (25%)
Examination (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle:
80% attendance at tutorials and participation in online tasks.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week contact hours plus 6 hours per week private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1200, HSC1081, PHH1081).

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Ben Smith

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the key principles and frameworks that guide health promotion and disease prevention in Australia and internationally. Students will examine concepts and theories that underpin health promotion and the primary care, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches used in this field. Important dimensions of practice, including partnerships, participation, multi-level action, capacity building and evidence-based practice will be explored. The areas of health promotion action that will be examined will encompass policy development for health, creating supportive environments, health education strategies, health communication techniques at the group and population level, and advocacy. The application of these to health challenges in diverse cultural and economic contexts will be explored. By the completion of this unit, students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of health promotion's key concepts, values and methods, and the criteria by which the quality of practice can be judged.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss and critically reflect on principles, concepts and frameworks that underpin health promotion;
  2. Compare primary care, behavioural, and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion and discuss their strengths and limitations;
  3. Describe the role of empowerment in health improvement and the scope for community participation in health promotion;
  4. Identify the attributes of effective partnerships for health promotion;
  5. Identify the different types of evidence that can guide health and sources of evidence that can assist in strategy selection;
  6. Critically reflect on the uses of health education, community organisation, communication and social marketing strategies to achieve individual, social, and policy changes;
  7. Discuss the contribution of policy development to health promotion;
  8. Describe the key domains of capacity building and the use of capacity building in health promotion;
  9. Discuss ethical challenges that are presented by health promotion.

Assessment

Class test (1 hour) (10%)
Research report (30%)
In-class presentation (20%)
Examination (40%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at tutorials.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours (1 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial) plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (BND1002, HSC1200, HSC1081, HSC1112, NUT1002, PHH1081, PHH1112).

Prohibitions

HSC1072, HSC2300, PHH2101


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Dragan Ilic

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit will look at how epidemiological techniques are applied in clinical research. It will explore how clinical trials and other types of studies are conducted in clinical settings. It will cover measurement of signs and symptoms (including normal and abnormal) and other clinical measurements, conduct and design of clinical research, interpretation of clinical research findings, and practical and ethical issues in clinical research.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Critically appraise evidence relating to the causation, diagnosis, natural history, treatment and prognosis of disease.
  2. Develop and select appropriate measures for use in clinical research.
  3. Design and conduct epidemiological research in clinical settings.
  4. Describe the application of clinical research findings to clinical practice.
  5. Critically appraise ethical and practical considerations in clinical research.

Assessment

2 x Online quizzes (10%)
3 x Group presentations (Oral with Powerpoint presentation) (20%)
Critical Appraisal Task (CAT) (30%)
Written examination (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle: Tutorial attendance (80% attendance).

Workload requirements

3 contact hours plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (BMS1042, HSC2141, PHH2141).

Prohibitions

PBH3001


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Biswajit Banik

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit explores the options for treatment and management of established health conditions at the individual level. It provides an introduction to pharmacology and an overview of other interventions commonly employed to manage illness and improve health. A case study approach will be used which looks at treatment options for key diseases (e.g. cancer).

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the processes by which drugs act on, and are handled by, the human body.
  2. Explain the role of drugs in prevention and treatment of specific diseases.
  3. Explain the role of other therapeutic (non-drug) interventions in prevention and treatment of specific diseases.
  4. Describe how drugs and other treatments are developed, evaluated and regulated.
  5. Discuss the social context of drug use and abuse.
  6. Discuss the relationship between drug therapy and public health in local and global contexts.

Assessment

Tutorial participation (5%)
Class test (1 hour) (10%)
Oral presentation and written report (1,000 words) (15%)
Written assignment (2,000 words) (30%)
Exam (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at tutorials.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (BMA1011, BMS1011, HSC1101, PHH1101) AND one of (BMA1012, BMS1021, HSC1102, PHH1102).

Prohibitions

PBH2006, PHH2111


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Ms Kelly Allen

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides an introduction to epidemiological and statistical concepts necessary for understanding patterns of health and disease in populations. It extends the overview provided in HSC1061, reviewing how health and disease are measured, and how patterns of health and disease in populations are investigated. Students are introduced to different study designs, analysing and interpreting health data and the concepts of bias and confounding. Case studies include local, national and global examples of epidemiological research.

Outcomes

On successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:

  1. Critically analyse the strengths and weaknesses of different epidemiological study designs.
  2. Critically appraise the popular and biomedical literature on population health.
  3. Identify fundamental ethical considerations that underpin health research.
  4. Identify the importance of statistical methods in the design, analysis and presentation of the results of research studies in health and biomedicine, and in reports of health related matters in general.
  5. Explain basic statistical methods and when to apply them.
  6. Interpret statistical results presented in the biomedical literature and other media, and convey the interpretation in simple language.
  7. Identify different approaches to the nature of 'evidence' in public health and the implications of such approaches for the measurement of health and well-being of indigenous and other population groups.

Assessment

2 x Written assignments (1,500 words each) (35%)
Group presentation (Oral) (15%)
2 x In-class biostatistics tests (20%)
Exam (2 hours) (30%)

Hurdle: At least 80% attendance at tutorial/computer laboratory classes.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1061, HSC1100, PHH1061).

Prohibitions

BMS1042, PBH2001, PBH2002


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Sheila Cyril

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit builds on the introduction to research methods provided in HSC1061. In that unit students' learning was focused on appraising evidence produced by other researchers, and on describing and comparing study designs. In this unit we extend this learning by enabling students to develop skills in designing and conducting their own research projects. The unit will cover: developing answerable research questions, matching research questions with study designs, collecting and analysing study data, managing research projects, and applications of quantitative, qualitative and combined approaches. The cultural, ethical and political contexts within which research takes place will also be discussed.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Develop researchable questions by completing a literature review to determine gaps in current knowledge.
  2. Develop and prepare a viable research protocol (which includes detailing the chosen research design, sampling and recruitment procedures, data collection and analysis strategies and a rationale for choices made in each of these arenas).
  3. Explain different types of research design and how to choose the most appropriate design to answer explanatory and exploratory research questions.
  4. Design effective research instruments (questionnaires, interview schedules, focus group schedules).
  5. Recognise and outline ethical dilemmas associated with planning and executing morally responsible, culturally sensitive research.

Assessment

Written assignments (3,500 words) (55%)
Exam (2 hours) (30%)
Tutorial participation (completion of required reading(s) and/or other preparation for classes and contribution to class discussions) (15%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at seminars.

Workload requirements

3 hour seminar plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1061, HSC1100, PHH1061).

Prohibitions

PBH2001, PHH2142


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

TBA

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit uses the framework of human development to examine health throughout the lifespan. Physical, cognitive, emotional, behavioural and psychosocial development, and the impact of culture on health will be examined. Students will investigate the roles of allied health professionals in assessing and maintaining health across the lifespan.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe physical, psychological and social milestones of human development throughout the lifespan, applying contemporary theories of development.
  2. Examine common acute and chronic health issues that occur across the lifespan.
  3. Identify the social and cultural determinants that impact upon human development.
  4. Identify essential activities and information regarding health promotion to meet the needs of individuals across the lifespan.
  5. Summarise theoretical perspectives on grieving and loss.
  6. Communicate effectively with individuals across the lifespan within an appropriate developmental framework.

Assessment

Portfolio: Guided reflection (900 words) (15%)
Portfolio: Values exchange (900 words) (15%)
Portfolio: Community engagement worksheet (Hurdle)
Essay (1,500 words) (25%)
Examination (2 hours) (45%)

Hurdle:
80% attendance at tutorials, community engagement placements and participation in online tasks.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week contact hours plus 6 hours per week private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

TBA

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Ben Smith

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the contemporary frameworks and strategies that are used to prevent disease and promote health at the population level. Students will examine methods for primary, secondary and tertiary prevention undertaken through health agencies, and develop an understanding of the role of different health professions in this work. Disease prevention methods investigated will include behavioural education and counselling, vaccination and pharmacological interventions, health screening, chronic disease self-management, and rehabilitation in health care and community settings. Health promotion will be introduced as an approach that uses multiple strategies to empower individuals and communities and create supportive environments for health. The health promotion actions examined will include policy development, community mobilisation, health education and social marketing. The role that partnerships and capacity building play in sustaining action and health outcomes will be investigated. Learning will be facilitated with case examples and consideration will be given to how the methods examined can be applied to current public health priorities.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, student should be able to:

  1. Identify frameworks and ethical principles that guide disease prevention and health promotion.
  2. Contrast primary, secondary and tertiary prevention methods and discuss examples of their applications.
  3. Discuss models of chronic disease self-management and behaviour change and discuss examples of their application.
  4. Identify guidelines and methods used in health screening, vaccination and clinical preventive services.
  5. Distinguish the role of policy, community mobilisation, social marketing and education in health promotion.
  6. Describe the role that partnerships and capacity building play in strengthening disease prevention and health promotion initiatives.

Assessment

In-class test (MCQs and short answers) (10%)
Literature review (1,800 words) (30%)
Oral group presentation (20 minutes) (20%)
Examination (2 hours) (40%)

Hurdle:
80% attendance at tutorials and participation in online tasks.

Workload requirements

6 hours per week contact hours plus 6 hours per week private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1081, PHH1081, HSC1200).

Prohibitions

HSC1072, HSC2101, PHH2101.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Liz Bishop

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit deals with two primary aspects of professional practice in the health and social care system, namely the legal and ethical principles that govern the operation of the system and the behaviour of individuals within it. The unit commences with an introduction to the legal framework, covering common law, statute law and the legal responsibilities of health and social care professionals. Students are then introduced to the ethical framework, through an examination of ethical theory, professional ethics, confidentiality, informed consent and relationships with patients. The complex interrelationship between legal and ethical aspects of healthcare practice is explored.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the legal framework pertinent to healthcare practice
  2. Explain why the study of health law is an essential aspect of professional practice
  3. Discuss issues related to justice in the healthcare system
  4. Describe medical and professional ethics and different ethical perspectives as related to healthcare
  5. Discuss the importance of confidentiality and informed consent.

Assessment

Written assignment: Response to 10 short answer questions (2,500 words) (50%) (Hurdle)
Written assignment: Major paper chosen from one of three provided topics (2,500 words) (50%) (Hurdle)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at seminars.

Workload requirements

2 hour seminar plus 10 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prohibitions

PBH2004, PHH3001


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Michaela Riddell

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will build on students' previous learning about global health, through examination of the 'health for all' agenda and associated approaches to meeting the challenges of health inequities. The intent of this unit is not only to further students' awareness of global health issues, but also to encourage critical thinking about the efficacy of global health programs and the ethics of delivering aid. Central to the unit will be the question of why there is often a failure to provide a total community approach to health issues.

Students will look at global health from a broad perspective, examining the global health architecture and the roles played by major actors. They will critically appraise social and economic approaches to global health problems and examine the positive and negative outcomes for health.

Major principles of effective and successful project management will be examined and past failures will be highlighted to demonstrate the complexity of health improvement in low- and middle-income countries.

The role of Australia bilateral donors (Australian AID, USAID etc) in giving development aid and addressing health issues in developing nations will be explored, with students being required to engage in examining and commenting upon the ethical aspects of donor activity. Individuals from the global health workforce will demonstrate the various careers available to students with a health sciences background.

The key themes of the unit will be consolidated to examine how these can be applied to continuing and future global health challenges.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Critically analyse the relationships between various actors and agencies in global health.
  2. Explain, using evidence from secondary sources, the positive and negative aspects of different approaches to global health programs in terms of equity and inequity.
  3. Analyse programs for health issues at national and international levels for their capacity to address health inequities.
  4. Apply principles of health-for-all to a project proposal designed to address global health challenges.
  5. Critique models of ethical and culturally appropriate development and aid delivery.
  6. Explain the current and future threats to global health with reference to various social, economic, environmental and political causes.

Assessment

Essay (2,000 words) (30%)
Project plan (1,000 words) (20%)
Project proposal (3,000 words) (50%)

Hurdle:
Formative assessment task Twitter report (800 words)
80% attendance at tutorials.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1081, HSC1112, HSC1200, PHH1112, PHH1081).

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Charles Livingstone

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit explores global and local health challenges that are at the forefront of Australia's health sector. Students will critically examine the construction of contemporary health challenges including: the implications of global inequalities in health and health problems arising from war and terrorism and political violence such as the refugee crisis.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss in depth some key contemporary health challenges demonstrating awareness of multiple perspectives, including the ways in which different health professions approach the issues and exploring how integrated approaches to addressing the issues may be mounted across disciplines;
  2. Demonstrate understanding of key global determinants of health;
  3. Consider the common and specific factors involved in the construction of various contemporary health challenges as being of 'high priority', particularly in the context of the role that evidence and other factors, including the media, play in this process;
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the complex interplay of political, economic, legal and socio-cultural frameworks in shaping contemporary health challenges and how they are responded to;
  5. Identify and discuss the implications of ideology, values and power bases in determining our understanding (and prioritising) of contemporary public health challenges;
  6. Explore specific case studies of contemporary health challenges (global or local) and critically reflect on current strategies and approaches to responding to them.

Assessment

Written outline of research topic (500 words) (15%)
Literature review (1,500 words) (25%)
Research essay (3,000 words) (50%)
Class presentation (in class oral presentation) (10%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at tutorials.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours (1 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial) plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (BMS1042, HSC1081, HSC1200, HSC2022, PHH1081, PHH2022).

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Michaela Riddell

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit focuses on prevention and control of diseases. Topics include principles of infection, outbreaks, public health control measures, and current issues in disease prevention and control. Public health control measures discussed may include surveillance, modelling, immunisation, antimicrobial therapies, infection control, vector control, screening and risk factor management.

These topics are illustrated using relevant examples of communicable diseases such as vaccine-preventable diseases (e.g. influenza); vector-borne diseases (e.g. malaria), food-borne diseases (e.g. salmonella) and sexually transmitted infections (e.g. HIV) and are compared with strategies to prevent and control non-communicable diseases. Epidemiological, social, and political perspectives are considered.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the distinguishing epidemiological features of infectious diseases.
  2. Explain how communicable infections are spread.
  3. Interpret epidemiological data on disease surveillance and disease outbreaks.
  4. Apply principles of communicable disease prevention to a range of scenarios, and identify which public health prevention and control strategies are appropriate for different diseases.
  5. Design and evaluate disease surveillance and control programs.
  6. Describe the role of social and political factors in disease prevention and control.
  7. Explore similarities and differences in prevention and control strategies for non communicable diseases and communicable diseases.

Assessment

2 x Written assignments (Total of 2,000 words) (30%)
Group presentation (Oral) (15%)
Tutorial exercises (10%)
Final exam (2 hours) (45%)

Hurdle: At least 80% attendance at tutorial classes.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours (1 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial) plus 9 hours private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

Prohibitions

PBH3002, PHH3041


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Ms Micaela Drieberg

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to settings and characteristics of health promotion delivered in various settings including hospitals, schools, workplaces and sporting organisations. Students will be introduced to settings frameworks, theories and approaches and the role of health professionals in diverse settings will be examined. Additionally approaches to building health promotion capacity among staff in these settings will also be explored. Students will gain a sound understanding of the evidence base for health promotion work in different settings and will critically examine the challenges for health promotion in these settings.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Define settings approaches and distinguish key features of the settings approach to health promotion;
  2. Identify sources of data to inform evidence-based approaches to health promotion in different settings;
  3. Describe different approaches to health promotion in settings including organisational change and policy development;
  4. Demonstrate skills in planning and implementation for health promotion in different settings;
  5. Identify systems level changes in settings that will support the use of health promotion strategies;
  6. Describe capacity building approaches to improve the quality and sustainability of health promotion in these settings.

Assessment

Evidence review (2,000 words) (35%)
Settings audit and program plan (2,500 words) (40%)
Case study group presentation (Oral with Powerpoint or Prezi presentation) (25%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at seminars.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (BND1002, HSC1072, HSC2051, NUT1002, PHH2051).


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Ben Smith

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will equip students with skills to undertake the evaluation of health promotion programs and policies using a range of methodologies. Levels of health program evaluation, including formative, process, impact, and outcome evaluation, will be examined. The range of qualitative and quantitative methods that are appropriate for different evaluation questions will be presented. An emphasis will be placed on the evaluation challenges posed by the complexities of health promotion and the contexts in which it is carried out, with case studies used to illustrate these issues. Evaluation design and data collection options to strengthen knowledge of program impact will be explored.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Distinguish between levels of evaluation in health promotion and recognise how these are linked to program plans;
  2. Select quantitative designs that are appropriate for different evaluation questions;
  3. Identify the range of qualitative study designs that can be employed and the strengths and weaknesses of these for different strategies and contexts;
  4. Identify methods to measure indicators at all levels of evaluation;
  5. Develop survey questions and interview guides that demonstrate an understanding of measurement quality;
  6. Recognise different aspects of measurement reliability and validity and how these can be evaluated;
  7. Develop a comprehensive evaluation plan.

Assessment

Evaluation design exercise (template provided) (10%)
Project evaluation plan (template provided) (40%)
Presentation of data collection tools (20 min oral presentation + 30 min class activities) (20%)
Data collection instrument (2,000 words) (30%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at seminars.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (BND1002, HSC1061, HSC1100, NUT1002, PHH1061) AND one of (BND2001, HSC2051, HSC2101, NUT2001, PHH2051, PHH2101).

Prohibitions

PBH3004, PHH3061


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Charles Livingstone

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

In this unit, students will examine the political foundations of health promotion and public health policies in Australia, different types of health policy, policy development processes and theories that underpin them. Interest groups and the challenges they pose to decision-making processes will be discussed. The social and political impacts of health policy will be explored, as well as the jurisdictional responsibilities held by different levels of government for health policies. Concepts of power, authority and influence will be discussed. Students will learn critical skills for policy analysis in the context of case studies of effective advocacy that have influenced policy change in Australia.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of health policy as a key dynamic element of the determinants of health, with effects on the health of populations and societies.
  2. Identify the structures, systems and institutions that contribute to the South African or any country's health policy environment with emphasis on health promotion and public health policy.
  3. Critically engage with a range of public policy issues and policy processes.
  4. Discuss types of health policy within the context of jurisdictions which hold responsibility for them.
  5. Explain the role of government and their agencies, NGOs and the community in the development and implementation of health policy.
  6. Distinguish types of power and how they are used by interest groups and individuals in policy development.
  7. Use policy analysis skills to critique existing policy using a case study approach.

Assessment

Group presentation (20 minutes) (25%)
Individual case study essay (1,500 words) (25%)
Research essay (2,500 words) (Hurdle) (50%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at tutorials.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours (1 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial) plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC1052, PHH1052).

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Darshini Ayton

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. To be considered for entry to HSC3082 students must have attained an average of at least 65% across level 2 HSC units. Entry is competitive and based on academic performance.

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Notes

  • The first compulsory seminar will be held during Orientation week of semester 2.
  • Students are required to obtain a Police Records check and Working With Children check.

Synopsis

This unit will assist students to put into practice the theory that underpins the profession of health promotion by working in an agency which has promoting health as part of its core business. It will provide practical experience in preparation for embarking or enhancing a career in health promotion as well as opportunities to learn about career development, resume development and reflection on skills and capacities required by a graduate. Applying the knowledge gained through their course by working in agencies that undertake population-based health promotion issues will help students to better understand health determinants and behaviour in the community, and prepare them for the realities of the workplace.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge and skills gained in health promotion units, in the practice of community-based health promotion.
  2. Demonstrate skills and knowledge in learning about career development.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of health promotion theories in program design and/or delivery.
  4. Reflect on the professional attitudes and skills required of health professionals working in community settings.
  5. Critically assess a workplace environment.
  6. Critically reflect on personal strengths and weaknesses as a health professional, and skills and capacities necessary for graduate employment.

Fieldwork

Each student will undertake a health promotion placement at a relevant organisation. The placement is 100 hours in duration and students need to be able to committ at least one day a week to complete their placement by mid-November.

Assessment

Mid placement reflection report (1,200 words) (15%)
Final reflection report (3,000 words) (30%)
Career portfolio (40%)
Mediated peer assessment activities (15%)

Hurdle requirements:
Attendance at a 15 minute practicum interview,
100 hours field placement,
12 hours of seminars.

Workload requirements

144 hours including 100 hours of field placement, 12 hours of seminars, contact time of 1 hour online discussion group between weeks 5-12, and 2 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of HSC2062 or PBH1102 AND one of HSC3061 or PHH3061

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Health Science or Bachelor of Public Health Science.

Prohibitions

HSC3132, PBH3007, PHH3082


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Ewan MacFarlane

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit explores the role of environmental factors in human health, how environmental health hazards are identified and how the risks can be assessed and managed. This unit will cover chemical, biological and physical hazards and their potential health effects in a range of environmental contexts. This unit will encourage students to critically evaluate environmental health information and its application in realistic situations. In this unit students will explore practical examples of environmental health hazards to identify the human health risks present, ways to assess exposure and options and strategies for assessment and management of the health risks identified.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the essential principles of hazard identification, risk assessment, risk management and risk communication.
  2. Demonstrate fluency with the basic concepts and terms used to describe chemical, physical and biological hazards.
  3. Describe basic principles of identifying common hazards and nominate ways to assess the risks presented.
  4. Nominate common interventions used to control environmental risks and the key personal, social and economic factors which may reduce the effectiveness or prevent control measures being successful.
  5. Critically evaluate environmental health research evidence and explain the limitations, relevance and application of the evidence to specific situations.

Assessment

In-class quiz (1 hour) (20%)
Written assignment (2,500 words) (40%)
Written assignment (2,500 words) (40%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at seminars.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (BND1002, BMS1042, HSC2141, NUT1002, PHH2141).

Prohibitions

PBH3003


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Ms Jessica Harding

Offered

Caulfield

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit provides the necessary skills for students to perform a quantitative design, data management and statistical analysis of a research project. This unit is a more specific development of quantitative health and medical research methodology that builds on the introductory material in 2nd year of the course. It will involve designing a research protocol, including defining the research question, performing a literature review, selection of type of study, defining a study population and sampling strategies, questionnaire design, ethics approval, and oral and written presentation of a protocol. It will also include sessions on managing data and choosing a statistical analysis approach. Students will choose a health research question of interest to them and design a research protocol for studying that particular question.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Develop an answerable research question that is appropriate for the gap in research.
  2. Perform a literature review around the topic and research question.
  3. Choose the appropriate study design and identify the strengths and limitations.
  4. Design a research project/protocol including project timeline.
  5. Define a study population and sampling strategies to answer the research question posed.
  6. Develop a specific approach to data collection and data collection method.
  7. Develop an approach to data analysis that is suitable to their research.
  8. Further cultivate skills in conducting ethical and culturally sensitive research.
  9. Present a written research protocol.

Assessment

2 x Written assignments (Total 3,000 words) (30%)
Group presentation (Oral) (15%)
In-class group work (15%)
Final report (3,500 words) (40%)

Hurdle: 80% attendance at seminars.

Workload requirements

3 contact hours plus 9 hours of private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

One of (HSC2141, PHH2141) AND one of (HSC2142, PHH2142).


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Ewan MacFarlane

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. To be considered for entry to HSC3132 students must have attained an average of at least 70% across level 2 HSC units. Entry is competitive and based on academic performance. Meeting the minimum entry requirement does not guarantee entry and final enrolment is at the discretion of the Unit Coordinator.

Offered

Caulfield

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Notes

Students are required to attend induction sessions in the week prior to the start of semester.

Synopsis

This unit provides an opportunity for high achieving students to experience public health research in practice. Application forms for this unit can be obtained from med-sphpm-ug@monash.edu. A strict quota applies and entry is based on academic performance. Students will be placed with a current public health/epidemiological research project and will undertake specific tasks within the project as well as being exposed to the broader research environment. The specific tasks undertaken will vary, but may include, for example, dealing with recruitment of study participants, data collection and management and analysis of findings. Students will apply research skills acquired in years 1 and 2 of their degree, in areas such as dealing with bias and confounding, developing data collection tools, managing and analyzing data, and ethical practices in the research environment. Students will prepare oral and written presentations relating to: their specific task/s; the research project with which they are working; and the research process more generally. This unit is particularly designed for students who are considering a research career, via an Honours degree and postgraduate study.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge and skills of research design, methodology and data analysis in the practice of public health/epidemiological research
  2. Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the practical and methodological issues in conducting public health/epidemiological research
  3. Critically reflect on the skills required for good research practice, including professional, ethical and practical issues
  4. Present oral and written reports of research processes and research outcomes.

Assessment

First oral presentation (10 mins) (15%)
Written assignment (1,500 words) (20%)
Final oral presentation (20 mins) (15%)
Final written report (3,000 words) (35%)
Supervisor's assessment, including attendance (15%)

Hurdle: Progress report checklist signed by both the student and supervisor.

Workload requirements

12 hours of on-site research work and private study per week. Students are also required to attend induction sessions in the week prior to the start of semester.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Health Science or Bachelor of Public Health Science.

Prohibitions

HSC3082, PBH3006, PHH3082


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Charles Livingstone

Offered

Alfred Hospital

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit aims to develop students' understanding and skills in the quantitative and qualitative research methods that underpin contemporary global public health and health science research, as well as the analysis, interpretation and reporting of data from such research. This unit introduces students to the theoretical methodological and ethical issues that underpin contemporary global public health and health science research. It provides direction and guidance to honours students in identifying a meaningful research question and develops the skills and knowledge students need to develop a research proposal. It re-introduces students to quantitative and qualitative research frameworks and data analysis techniques they need both to undertake their study and write a research report.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a good understanding of the research process and skills needed to produce a research report to meet the standard required at honours level by developing an outline and plan of a research process suitable for their research project;
  2. Critique their outline and plan for their research project;
  3. Explain the formulation of research questions and formulate a research question relevant to their research project;
  4. Demonstrate a good understanding of the range of quantitative and qualitative research frameworks utilised in public health and health science research by:
    • Identifying the research frameworks used in a range of research projects;
    • Selecting the most suitable research framework/methodology for given examples of research projects; and,
    • Justifying the research framework/methodology chosen for their research project;
  5. Link research paradigms or methods to research questions;
  6. Demonstrate a good understanding of data analysis methods associated with the various research frameworks by:
    • Identifying the most appropriate data analysis methods for different research frameworks;
    • Selecting the most suitable data analysis methods for their research project; and
    • Justifying the data analysis methods chosen for their research project;
  7. Demonstrate a good understanding of potential further research available to them by identifying future research activities in which they could participate and are of specific interest to them.

Assessment

Hurdle: Students are required to attend 80% of seminars and colloquia.

Formative assessment: Feedback during seminar participation as well as following the three summative assessments.

Summative assessment:
An individual presentation during the semester on students' project methodologies (20%)
A class test on the quantitative and qualitative research frameworks and approaches to data analysis utilised in public health and health science research topics covered during the semester. The class test will contain both multiple choice and short answer questions (20%)
A word assignment based on students' project methodologies which will form the basis of the student's methods chapter of the thesis (3,000 - 3,500 words) (60%)

Workload requirements

Four class contact hours per week (seminar style), attendance of a weekly colloquium (1-2 hours per week), plus regular project supervision (1-2 hours per fortnight). In addition, as per University requirements, students will be required to spend up to 20 hours per week in private study/self-directed learning (i.e. a total of 24 hours per week).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3971.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Charles Livingstone

Offered

Alfred Hospital

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester to First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The Honours thesis is a research study, focusing on a particular contemporary global public health and health science research topic or issue, undertaken with the guidance and support of a supervisor. Students will be expected to demonstrate initiative and independence during their research study. All Honours students are required to present on their research project at a research seminar prior to submission. The Honours thesis is designed for students who are intending to undertake further higher degree studies. Graduates who have successfully completed the Health Science Research Project (both Part 1 and Part 2) will be able to use their 15,000 word study as evidence of independent research experience in an application for entry into higher research degree programs.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to develop a research topic to investigate that is feasible within a two-semester time frame by submitting a 15,000 word thesis;
  2. Identify key research questions that are suitable for an honours level project;
  3. Select and review relevant theory and literature;
  4. Design a study and choose appropriate methods to investigate research questions;
  5. Select appropriate modes of analysis;
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of and discuss the ethical issues involved in their research project;
  7. Implement, critically appraise or apply research in a particular field;
  8. Prepare a comprehensive written report that is professionally presented and contains all elements required for an academic/scientific journal publication; and
  9. Present and lead a discussion on their project as part of the weekly colloquium series.

Assessment

Hurdle: Students are required to attend 80% of colloquia, and are required to meet with their supervisor at least once a fortnight for 1-2 hours.

Formative assessment:
An individual presentation and feedback on students' completed projects - to occur prior to submission
Feedback during supervision throughout the semester.

Summative assessment:
Research-based honours thesis (15,000 words) (100%). Students' theses will be examined as per normal Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences' practice, that is examined by at least two examiners. Additional examiners may be used if there is a significant descrepancy between the examiners.

Workload requirements

Two class contact hours per week (seminar style), attendance of a weekly colloquium (1-2 hours per week), plus regular project supervision (1-2 hours per fortnight). In addition, as per University requirements, students will be required to spend up to 40 hours per week in private study/self-directed learning (i.e. a total of 48 hours per week).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3971.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Michaela Riddell

Offered

Alfred Hospital

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit aims for students to develop critical and analytic skills as applied to contemporary global public health and health science research literature. It will also provide students with advanced knowledge in specific areas of public health and health science relevant to their honours. Seminars will focus on topics such as current public health thinking and practice. Global and local dimensions of health, as well as on skills in evidence appraisal and systematic searching. Students will be active learners with the presentation of seminars to the class during the semester, and leading the discussion that follows. Students will provide a written review of a topic that is related to their specific research project that demonstrates advanced theoretical understanding of the issues and research relating to that topic.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss contemporary global approaches to research in health sciences and public health;
  2. Critically assess what is known and not known in the literature, about global public health science in relation to selected topics covered during the seminars as well as to students' research topics;
  3. Develop a systematic search strategy on a specific topic based on a research question, encompassing the development of inclusion-exclusion criteria, a search strategy and table summaries of selected studies;
  4. Critically review the scientific literature relative to a defined research question; and,
  5. Prepare a literature review of a health issue using critical analysis.

Assessment

Hurdle: Students are required to attend 80% of tutorials/seminars.

Formative assessment: Feedback during seminar participation and presentations delivered.

Summative assessment:
A written critical analysis of the relationship between their Honours research topic and the Sustainable Development Goals to be assessed using a set of assessment criteria included in the Unit Guide (1,200 words) (15%)
An oral presentation of the findings of the background literature review undertaken to provide a rationale for your Honours research project to be assessed using a set of assessment criteria included in the Unit Guide (15%)
A written critical review of research papers on a specific public health and/or health science issue that will form the basis of the student's literature review for their final thesis (4,000 - 5,000 words) (70%)

Workload requirements

3 class contact hours per week (tutorial/seminar). Attendance at the weekly SPHPM HDR seminars (1 hour). In addition, as per University requirements, students will be required to spend 20 hours per week on the unit in private study (i.e. a total of 24 hours per week).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Health science

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3971.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Occupational Therapy

Coordinator(s)

Dr Karen Richards

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides the basic understanding of the concept of health particularly in the primary care clinical settings. This exploration will begin at a personal level and expand to clinical settings with the broader health environment. Varied definitions and models of health will be introduced to allow a detailed exploration of illness, health risks and how individuals, families and communities use limited resources.

Differences between health of the individual and the broader population will be examined using the clinical environment as the focal point. The factors that impact the dimensions of health will be critically explored to better understand the roles of government policies, the private sector and communities. Current inequalities in resources and other factors affecting health in clinical settings will be identified.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Reflect on their own values and assumptions regarding health and well-being.
  2. Explain the influence of diverse definitions, concepts and interpretations of health and well-being on health care.
  3. Compare and contrast various models and frameworks of health and describe the value of these.
  4. Identify the various determinants of health and describe how these affect health care provision and create inequalities in health.
  5. Apply the principles of the 'determinants of health' approach in discussing selected health issues.
  6. Discuss critical perspectives used to explore health and examine their implications for health and social care practice.

Assessment

Essay (2,000 words) (25%)
Written assignment (2,500 words) (35%)
Examination (2 hours) (20%)
Class preparation activities and participation (20%)

Hurdle:
Students are required to attend 80% of all tutorials.
Students are required to complete an essay plan as preparation for their 2,000 word essay.

Workload requirements

12 hours per week including contact time (1 hour lecture, 2 hour tutorial), fieldwork and self-directed learning.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Richard Loiacono, Professor Shah Yasin

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

MED1011 will introduce students to the four themes (sub-units) upon which the five-year curriculum is based:
THEME I: Personal and Professional Development: students will participate in a transition program, focusing on transition to university life, personal ethics, healthy lifestyle, group support and communication skills. This will be followed by a Health Enhancement program concentrating on self care (stress management, relaxation training, coping skills), other aspects of healthy lifestyle and group support, and introduction to the science of Mind-Body Medicine. Also included: an introduction to Ethics and Medical Law.
THEME II: Population, Society, Health and Illness: Health, Knowledge and Society Teaching will provide a framework of inquiry allowing analysis of the social aspects of medicine.
THEME III: Foundations of Medicine: The Fabric of Life provides students with foundation knowledge in genomics and cell biology in health and disease. An integral part of this theme will be the weekly problem based learning activity
(PBL). Each PBL integrates material presented to students in this and other themes throughout the week.
THEME IV: Clinical Skills: introduces students to practical clinical skills including: handwashing, sharps disposal; subcutaneous and intramuscular injecting. Students will interact with health care professionals during medical contact visits, and will be introduced to the medical interview, taking a family history, ethical aspects of medical contact visits.

Outcomes

Theme I:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Recognise the legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Discuss issues related to justice, the importance and role of advocacy within the health system
  4. Practice principles of ethical decision making and consultation with peers and teachers
  5. Describe characteristics of a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify the types of risks and errors in health care settings and the role of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Recognise the importance of research and quality improvement
  10. Recognise the need to evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify available support services
  12. Describe appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others (simulated patients, peers, teaching staff)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities health care team members and their professions and show the ability to work collaboratively within a team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Recognise own strengths and limitations, including personal factors which impact upon performance, and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the concept of primary healthcare and the interrelated themes of social justice and human rights in the context of population health.
  2. Describe the effects of the key social determinants of health on health status and outcomes in marginalised groups, including the Indigenous population.
  3. Explain the effects of cultural, geographic and economic factors on access to healthcare and health status.
  4. Discuss the components, organisation and goals of health systems, and the relationship between health system quality and health outcomes.
  5. Define levels of disease prevention.
  6. Explain key concepts in medical screening and diagnostic programs including validity and reliability of these programs.
  7. Describe the relationship between exposure, causation and risk factors for disease and morbidity in populations.
  8. Describe the purpose of health promotion programs.
  9. Describe key concepts in population health, epidemiology and measurement of health and disease in populations.
  10. Describe key concepts in biostatistics and interpret biostatistical information in medical research publications.
  11. Describe the characteristics of different study designs used in population health and clinical research.
  12. Describe the role of health care services in maintaining health and in monitoring, managing and preventing disease.
  13. Describe the interaction between health care consumers and health care services
  14. Identify sources of information used to support clinical decision making and management in health care.
  15. Identify human and organisational factors that may impact upon patient care.
  16. Outline the principles involved in efficient allocation of health care funding.
  17. Outline the structure of medical literature and the roles of the different academic styles of writing.
  18. Search for medical research information and data from personal, print and electronic sources.
  19. Organise and manage information sourced from medical research publications and popular information sources.
  20. Critique information on health and health care provided to the public.

Theme III:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss normal cell and tissue structure and formation;
  2. Describe and compare genes in health and disease;
  3. Describe the immune system in health and disease;
  4. Explain the interaction between microbial organisms and the human host and the role of parasites and fungi in infectious disease;
  5. Describe injury and the host response;
  6. Discuss the nature of neoplasia and genetic and environment factors leading its progression and spread.
  7. Explain the key concepts of human psychology and the neurobiological basis of human behaviour
  8. Outline and explain the general principles, concepts and language of neuroscience that will provide a basis for the study of neural control of body systems and neurology in later semesters;

Theme IV:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview in simulated environments
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history in simulated environments
  3. Perform an appropriate examination for specified systems in simulated environments.
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in simulated environments
  5. For specified conditions, identify relevant investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Identify the required information for completion of requests for investigations.
  7. Provide a basic interpretation of results for specified investigations
  8. Outline the reasons for prioritising patient care
  9. Generate a problem list
  10. Formulate a differential diagnosis (list)
  11. Identify the function of management plans in patient care
  12. For specified conditions identify clinically appropriate medications
  13. Explain the importance of monitoring patients
  14. Explain the importance of fluid and electrolyte management
  15. Identify the importance of procedures and documentation for continuity of care
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Recognise the basic elements of patient case files.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Examinations and written assignments to account for 30% of the end of Year 1 result. Assessment of materials presented in the result for MED1011 will be a pass grade only (PGO).

Hurdle: Students must attend a minimum of 80% at designated small group teaching activities to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 4531 or 4533.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Richard Loiacono, Professor Shah Yasin

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

THEME 1: 'Health Enhancement Program' develops strategies for personal health enhancement and ethical/legal issues relevant to professional responsibility, the doctor-patient relationship and public accountability.
THEME 2: 'Population Health' develops an understanding of epidemiology, construction of epidemiological study design, function and interpretation of statistical information and critical appraisal of research publications.
THEME 3: The scientific basis of clinical practice of the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular medicine and human life span.
THEME 4: 'Clinical Skills' develops comprehensive medical history taking skills and examination of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and peripheral nervous system. Develop an awareness of key ethical issues involved in communication with patients, family members, carers and health professionals. Rural attachment: a week based at a rural centre will focus on developing an understanding of the practice of medicine in a rural context.

Outcomes

Theme I:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Recognise the legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Discuss issues related to justice, the importance and role of advocacy within the health system
  4. Practice principles of ethical decision making and consultation with peers and teachers
  5. Describe characteristics of a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify the types of risks and errors in health care settings and the role of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Recognise the importance of research and quality improvement
  10. Recognise the need to evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify available support services
  12. Describe appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others (simulated patients, peers, teaching staff)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities health care team members and their professions and show the ability to work collaboratively within a team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities
  15. Recognise own strengths and limitations, including personal factors which impact upon performance, and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the concept of primary healthcare and the interrelated themes of social justice and human rights in the context of population health
  2. Describe the effects of the key social determinants of health on health status and outcomes in marginalised groups, including the Indigenous population
  3. Explain the effects of cultural, geographic and economic factors on access to healthcare and health status
  4. Discuss the components, organisation and goals of health systems, and the relationship between health system quality and health outcomes
  5. Define levels of disease prevention
  6. Explain key concepts in medical screening and diagnostic programs including validity and reliability of these programs.
  7. Describe the relationship between exposure, causation and risk factors for disease and morbidity in populations
  8. Describe the purpose of health promotion programs
  9. Describe key concepts in population health, epidemiology and measurement of health and disease in populations
  10. Describe key concepts in biostatistics and interpret biostatistical information in medical research publications
  11. Describe the characteristics of different study designs used in population health and clinical research
  12. Describe the role of health care services in maintaining health and in monitoring, managing and preventing disease
  13. Describe the interaction between health care consumers and health care services
  14. Identify sources of information used to support clinical decision making and management in health care
  15. Identify human and organisational factors that may impact upon patient care
  16. Outline the principles involved in efficient allocation of health care funding
  17. Outline the structure of medical literature and the roles of the different academic styles of writing
  18. Search for medical research information and data from personal, print and electronic sources
  19. Organise and manage information sourced from medical research publications and popular information sources
  20. Critique information on health and health care provided to the public.

Theme III:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the function of peripheral sensory systems, sensory pathways, motor pathways and the importance of sensory feedback
  2. Describe the general and detailed organization of the limbs and back
  3. Identify and test the muscle groups acting on the joints of the upper and lower limb, the cranio-vertebral and the intervertebral joints, and their normal range of movement
  4. Identify the surface markings of the major joints, nerves, blood vessels, ligaments and bony features of the upper and lower limbs and vertebral column and understand the application of imaging technologies to the musculoskeletal systems
  5. Discuss the detailed structure and function of the tissues of the musculoskeletal system, including bone, muscle, tendon, articular cartilage, ligaments and connective tissue
  6. Explain key concepts of human psychology and the neurobiological basis of human behaviour
  7. Discuss the pathogenesis of diseases caused by bacteria and microbes
  8. Outline the pharmacological agents used in the treatment of infectious disease
  9. Describe the trajectory of development, and its importance to an understanding of the individual as a complete human being within a social setting
  10. Describe the structure and function of the healthy cardiovascular system
  11. Discuss the mechanisms and effects of selected common pathologies affecting the cardiovascular system
  12. Outline therapeutic agents commonly used to deal with disorders of the cardiovascular system
  13. Give an account of the interactions of the cardiovascular system in the maintenance of homeostasis
  14. Discuss the structure and function of neurons, signaling mechanisms, drug actions and receptors mechanisms, and the organization, inter relationship and general function of all divisions of the nervous system.

Theme IV:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview in simulated environments
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history in simulated environments
  3. Perform an appropriate examination for specified systems in simulated environments.
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in simulated environments
  5. For specified conditions, identify relevant investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Identify the required information for completion of requests for investigations.
  7. Provide a basic interpretation of results for specified investigations
  8. Outline the reasons for prioritising patient care
  9. Generate a problem list
  10. Formulate a differential diagnosis (list)
  11. Identify the function of management plans in patient care
  12. For specified conditions identify clinically appropriate medications
  13. Explain the importance of monitoring patients
  14. Explain the importance of fluid and electrolyte management
  15. Identify the importance of procedures and documentation for continuity of care
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Recognise the basic elements of patient files

Rural Attachment:

Upon completion of this Rural Attachment, students should be able to:

  1. Recognise the importance of place to health, illness, injury and health service delivery
  2. Describe the health, illness, community services and facilities available in a rural location
  3. Recognise how rural health differs across gender, age, race and sexual orientation
  4. Compare and contrast medicine in a rural context with their metropolitan experiences to date.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Examinations and written assignments to account for 70% of the end of Year 1 result. Assessment of materials presented in the result for MED1022 will be a pass grade only (PGO).

Hurdle: Students must attend a minimum of 80% at designated small group teaching activities to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 4531 or 4533.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Richard Loiacono, Professor Shah Yasin

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

MED2000 provides an overall result for Year 1 & 2 MBBS based upon achievement in MED1011, MED1022, MED2031, MED2042 and the first Integrated Vertical Assessment (VIA) examination. Students will need to successfully complete MED1011, MED1022, MED2031, MED2042 and the VIA examination. A grade will be awarded for MED2000 which is based on student achievement in MED1011, MED1022, MED2031 and MED2042 and the VIA examination.

Outcomes

MED2000 is a hurdle requirement for successful completion of the MBBS course. Upon completion of this unit, students should have demonstrated the necessary integration of knowledge and skills developed during Years 1 - 2 of the medicine course.

Assessment

MED1011 (12.5%)
MED1022 (12.5%)
MED2031 (27.5%)
MED2042 (27.5%)
First VIA examination (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 4531 or 4533.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Richard Loiacono, Professor Shah Yasin

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Through the theme based curriculum, this unit continues to provide integrated studies that build the foundations for commencing studies in clinical settings. A deeper understanding of the socio-economic context of health and illness, awareness of the non-medical services which support the practice of medicine, and improved health outcomes is developed. Ethical/legal issues relevant to professional responsibility, the doctor-patient relationship and public accountability link directly to future clinical practice. Students acquire skills in basic research, including data management and critical appraisal of evidence and knowledge which provide the basis for evidence based clinical decision-making. Scientific basis of clinical practice aims to provide students with detailed knowledge of selected body systems in health and disease. In the clinical skills component of the curriculum, students are expected to draw upon theoretic knowledge, and apply this during the development clinical reasoning, and the performance of key clinical skills tasks. An integral component of this unit is the weekly problem based learning activity (PBL). Each PBL integrates content presented to students across the four themes throughout the week.

Outcomes

Theme I:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Recognise the legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Discuss issues related to justice, the importance and role of advocacy within the health system
  4. Practice principles of ethical decision making and consultation with peers and teachers
  5. Describe characteristics of a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify the types of risks and errors in health care settings and the role of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Recognise the importance of research and quality improvement
  10. Recognise the need to evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify available support services
  12. Describe appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others (simulated patients, peers, teaching staff)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities health care team members and their professions and show the ability to work collaboratively within a team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities
  15. Recognise own strengths and limitations, including personal factors which impact upon performance, and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the interplay of medical, scientific, social, cultural, political, economic and ethical factors in health promotion
  2. Describe and compare medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion
  3. Explain key concepts in medical screening and diagnostic programs including validity and reliability of these programs
  4. Describe the relationship between exposure, causation and risk factors for disease and morbidity in populations
  5. Appraise a health promotion program
  6. Source and interpret biostatistical information relevant to health and disease in populations across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, refugee vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  7. Describe the characteristics of different study designs used in population health and clinical research
  8. Describe the role of health care services and the essential roles of systems in maintaining health and in monitoring, managing and preventing disease across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  9. Describe sources of information used to support clinical decision making and management in health care
  10. Describe human and organisational factors that may impact upon patient care
  11. Outline the structure of medical literature and the roles of the different academic styles of writing
  12. Search effectively and efficiently medical research information and data from personal, print and electronic sources
  13. Organise and manage information sourced from medical research publications and popular information sources
  14. Critically appraise articles in medical and health care literature.

Theme III:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. discuss the relevance of biomedical science to the practice of respiratory, endocrine, haemopoetic and renal medicine, and apply knowledge in these areas in an integrative manner to the understanding of particular cases or clinical issues
  2. describe the structure and function of the healthy respiratory and renal, endocrine systems and the formation and function of blood
  3. discuss the mechanisms and effects of selected common pathologies affecting these systems
  4. outline therapeutic agents commonly used to deal with disorders of these systems
  5. give an account of the interactions of these systems in the maintenance of homeostasis, drawing upon knowledge acquired in preceding semesters
  6. discuss the relevance of biomedical science to the practice of medicine in the areas of endocrinology and metabolism, gastroenterology and nutrition, and apply knowledge in these areas in an integrative manner to the understanding of particular cases or clinical issues
  7. describe the role of endocrine systems in normal and pathological function
  8. discuss the normal growth pattern and the attendant nutritional requirements of individuals from birth to adulthood, recognise the sources of deviation from such normal patterns and appreciate the role of nutrition in health and disease, taking account of social and cultural influences
  9. describe the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract and comprehend the pathophysiology of common symptoms and major diseases of the gastrointestinal tract
  10. outline therapeutic agents relevant for endocrine, gastrointestinal conditions.

Student Project Cases:

On the completion of this activity students will be able to:

  1. integrate information from the four curriculum themes based on the range of learning activities, including self-directed research
  2. integrate and synthesise information from different body systems and human perspectives in the appreciation of clinical issues
  3. identify relevant resources and critically analyse information from a variety of sources
  4. develop skills in problem solving and apply in a medical context
  5. develop interpretative skills related to the evaluation of endocrine, metabolic, gastrointestinal, nutritional, reproductive and developmental information and issues, interfacing biomedical science with clinical medicine
  6. work effectively and communicate constructively within small groups in the planning, development and implementation of teamwork tasks, with individual and group responsibilities and adherence to project timelines
  7. discuss issues and problems in a structured manner and act as spokesperson for a group in a wider forum
  8. apply skills in audiovisual presentations on particular topics in medicine
  9. develop skills in preparation of written summaries in the form of notes suitable for effective communication and education
  10. apply constructive critiques to verbal and written presentations.

Theme IV:

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview in simulated environments
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history in simulated environments
  3. Perform an appropriate examination for specified systems in simulated environments
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in simulated environments
  5. For specified conditions, identify relevant investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Describe the requirements for requests/ordering relevant investigations.
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations in simulated settings/scenarios
  8. Outline the reasons for prioritising patient care
  9. Generate a problem list
  10. Formulate and discuss their reasoning for a differential diagnosis (list)
  11. Outline a basic management plan for specified common problems and conditions
  12. For specified conditions identify clinically appropriate medications
  13. Explain the importance of monitoring patients
  14. Recognise the need for the management of conditions using fluid, electrolyte and blood products
  15. Identifies the importance of procedures and documentation for continuity of care
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Recognise the basic elements of patient case files.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Some activities may be completed in either MED2031 or MED2042

Two written exams (3 hours each) (MCQ/SAQ) (10% each/ 20% total) [MED2031]
Two written exams (3 hours each) (MCQ/SAQ) (10% each/ 20% total) [MED2041]
Written assignments in Health Promotion (2 x 3000 words) (17%) [Either MED2031 or MED2042], & Additional Piece (a creative piece of work with a variable presentation) (3%) [MED2042]
Written assignments for Rural and or Prevention Science placements (3000 words) (10%) [Either MED2031 or MED2042]
Student project cases (written assignment and oral presentation) (3500 words written, 30 min presentation) (10%) [MED2031]
Clinical skills practical examination (OSCE) (20%) [MED2042]

Assessment of materials presented in the result for MED2031 will be a pass grade only (PGO)

Hurdle requirement: Students must satisfactorily complete a breast examination activity; and must attend a minimum of 80% of designated small group teaching activities to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

MED2000 and must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 4531 or 4533.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Richard Loiacono, Professor Shah Yasin

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit builds upon studies completed in MED2031 with further integrated studies to provide the foundations for commencing studies in clinical settings. Student continue to develop deeper understanding of the socio-economic context of health and illness awareness of the non-medical services which support the practice of medicine, and improved health outcomes is developed. Ethical/legal issues relevant to professional responsibility, the doctor-patient relationship, and public accountability link are key component of preparation for immersion in clinical contexts. Skills in basic research skills including data management and critical appraisal of evidence and knowledge which provide the basis for evidence based clinical decision-making are consolidated. Scientific basis of clinical practice extends students with detailed knowledge of major body systems in health and disease. In the clinical skills component of the curriculum, students are expected to draw upon theoretic knowledge, and apply this during the development clinical reasoning as well as consolidating proficiency in key clinical skills tasks. An integral component of this unit is the weekly problem based learning activity (PBL). Each PBL integrates content presented to students across the four themes throughout the week.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

Theme 1

  1. Recognise the legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Discuss issues related to justice, the importance and role of advocacy within the health system
  4. Practice principles of ethical decision making and consultation with peers and teachers
  5. Describe characteristics of a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify the types of risks and errors in health care settings and the role of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Recognise the importance of research and quality improvement
  10. Recognise the need to evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify available support services
  12. Describe appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others (simulated patients, peers, teaching staff)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities health care team members and their professions and show the ability to work collaboratively within a team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities.
  15. Recognise own strengths and limitations, including personal factors which impact upon performance, and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II

  1. Discuss the interplay of medical, scientific, social, cultural, political, economic and ethical factors in health promotion
  2. Describe and compare medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion
  3. Explain key concepts in medical screening and diagnostic programs including validity and reliability of these programs
  4. Describe the relationship between exposure, causation and risk factors for disease and morbidity in populations
  5. Appraise a health promotion program
  6. Source and interpret biostatistical information relevant to health and disease in populations across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, refugee vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  7. Describe the characteristics of different study designs used in population health and clinical research
  8. Describe the role of health care services and the essential roles of systems in maintaining health and in monitoring, managing and preventing disease across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  9. Describe sources of information used to support clinical decision making and management in health care
  10. Describe human and organisational factors that may impact upon patient care
  11. Outline the structure of medical literature and the roles of the different academic styles of writing
  12. Search effectively and efficiently medical research information and data from personal, print and electronic sources
  13. Organise and manage information sourced from medical research publications and popular information sources
  14. Critically appraise articles in medical and health care literature.

Theme III:

  1. Discuss the relevance of biomedical science to the practice of medicine in the areas of sexuality, development and growth, and apply knowledge in these areas in an integrative manner to the understanding of particular cases or clinical issues
  2. Describe the basic processes of reproduction and early development, comprehend infertility and strategies to manage reproduction and contraception, understand how fetal conditions can determine adult disease
  3. Outline therapeutic agents relevant for neurological, reproductive, and psychological conditions
  4. Describe the anatomy of the head and neck including the intracranial region
  5. Describe the physiology of central nervous system function
  6. Demonstrate an introductory level of understanding of human psychology and the neurobiological basis of human behaviour
  7. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of neurons, signaling mechanisms, drug actions and receptors mechanisms, and the organization, inter relationship and general function of all divisions of the nervous system; demonstrate an introductory level of understanding of human psychology and the neurobiological basis of human behaviour.

Theme IV

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview in simulated environments
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history in simulated environments
  3. Perform an appropriate examination for specified systems in simulated environments
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in simulated environments
  5. For specified conditions, identify relevant investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Describe the requirements for requests/ordering relevant investigations.
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations in simulated settings/scenarios
  8. Outlines the reasons for prioritising patient care
  9. Generate a problem list
  10. Formulate and discuss their reasoning for a differential diagnosis (list)
  11. Outline a basic management plan for specified common problems and conditions
  12. For specified conditions identify clinically appropriate medications
  13. Explains the importance of monitoring patients

Rural placement:

Upon successful completion of this placement, students should be able to:

  1. Describe and discuss how rural contexts impact on the assessment of health conditions
  2. Recognise the importance of context and clinical reasoning in relation to focused history taking
  3. Describe and discuss how a rural context impacts on the clinical and non-clinical management of patients
  4. Analyse the ways in which rural diversity can impact on rural health, illness and clinical practice
  5. Reflect on the nature of a rural clinical practice from a clinician's perspective.

Student Project Cases:

Upon successful completion of this activity, students should be able to:

  1. Integrate information from the four curriculum themes based on the range of learning activities, including self-directed research
  2. Integrate and synthesise information from different body systems and human perspectives in the appreciation of clinical issues
  3. Identify relevant resources and critically analyse information from a variety of sources
  4. Develop skills in problem solving and apply in a medical context
  5. Develop interpretative skills related to the evaluation of endocrine, metabolic, gastrointestinal, nutritional, reproductive and developmental information and issues, interfacing biomedical science with clinical medicine
  6. Work effectively and communicate constructively within small groups in the planning, development and implementation of teamwork tasks, with individual and group responsibilities and adherence to project timelines
  7. Discuss issues and problems in a structured manner and act as spokesperson for a group in a wider forum
  8. Apply skills in audiovisual presentations on particular topics in medicine
  9. Develop skills in preparation of written summaries in the form of notes suitable for effective communication and education
  10. Apply constructive critiques to verbal and written presentations.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Some activities may be completed in either MED2031 or MED2042

Two written exams (3 hours each) (MCQ/SAQ) (10% each/ 20% total) [MED2031]
Two written exams (3 hours each) (MCQ/SAQ) (10% each/ 20% total) [MED2041]
Written assignments in Health Promotion (2 x 3000 words) (17%) [Either MED2031 or MED2042], & Additional Piece (a creative piece of work with a variable presentation) (3%) [MED2042]
Written assignments for Rural and or Prevention Science placements (3000 words) (10%) [Either MED2031 or MED2042]
Student project cases (written assignment and oral presentation) (3500 words written, 30 min presentation) (10%) [MED2031]
Clinical skills practical examination (OSCE) (20%) [MED2042]

Assessment of materials presented in the result for MED2042 will be a pass grade only (PGO)

Hurdle requirement: Students must satisfactorily complete a breast examination activity; and must attend a minimum of 80% of designated small group teaching activities to pass this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

MED2000 and must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 4531 or 4533.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • First semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Notes

Students who fail to progress in MED3051 in Semester 1 must discontinue from MED3200. Unit discontinuation penalites will apply.

Synopsis

MED3051 is an integrated medicine/surgery curriculum based on the four themes of the medical curriculum: Personal and professional development; population, society, health and illness; foundations of medicine; and clinical skills. Evidence-based educational approaches support students in acquiring appropriate knowledge, attitudes and skills in medicine, surgery, clinical skills, evidence-based clinical practice, occupational and environmental medicine, pathophysiology, pharmacology, ethics and law. Previous learning will be extended.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

Theme I: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Apply the legal requirements and protocols to clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Recognise issues related to justice and the role of advocacy that are evident within the health system
  4. Practice and discuss ethical decision making and consultation in clinical environments
  5. Display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments.
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Describe factors that contribute to risks and errors in health care settings and the responsibilities of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Identify the activities in clinical settings that contribute to research and quality improvement in healthcare
  10. Review and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify support strategies
  12. Use appropriate environments and strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities of patient centred health care team members and their professions and opportunities to assist the health care team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities
  15. Articulate own strengths, acknowledge own limitations which impact upon performance, seek support and self-advocate for improvement.
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Discuss occupational and environmental factors that affect health, well-being and safety and the capacity to perform work
  2. Explain medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion
  3. Explain the rationale for a health intervention/screening program
  4. Critique appropriate strategies for disease prevention and health promotion for patients
  5. Source and interpret biostatistical information relevant to health and disease in populations across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  6. Identify study designs used in population health and clinical research publications/reports/projects
  7. Describe the delivery of health care and the essential roles of systems to the individual across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  8. Discuss the rationale, methodology and application of clinical decision making processes and strategies
  9. Recognise and describe human and organisational factors relevant to risk management in health care settings
  10. Effectively communicate observations and analysis in written and oral formats
  11. Formulate and conduct an effective search for information relevant to the clinical care of a patient
  12. Organise, manage, interpret and apply information sourced from medical research publications and popular information sources
  13. Critique data and information sourced in medical literature
  14. Define and describe a rationale for levels of evidence.

Theme III: Scientific basis of clinical practice

History/examination and Differential Diagnosis:

  1. Identify and apply the scientific bases that underpin the rational approach to eliciting a history and examining a patient in common diseases
  2. Formulate a differential diagnosis and problem list relevant to the patient.

Clinical Features, Natural history, Pathogenesis and Pathology of disease

  1. Describe the natural history, pathogenesis and morphology of pathological processes related to specific diseases and conditions. Relate these to their clinical manifestations.

Recognition of Complexity in Patients' Health and Disease:

  1. Recognize that patients can present with problems due to multiple causes and contributing factors, including psychosocial factors, which impact upon their management, care and outcomes.

Investigating Health Problems:

  1. Determine and describe the scientific rationale that underpins the selection of appropriate investigations to confirm the diagnosis and guide the management of the patient
  2. Interpret the results of investigations and relate these to the diagnosis and/or management of the patient's condition.

General Principles of Management

  1. Outline the scientific basis for the range of therapeutic approaches available to manage a patient's problem
  2. Analyse the scientific rationale that underpins medical and surgical therapies (the scientific basis of therapies and their implementation)
  3. Select appropriate management options for patients, medical (including pharmacological) and interventional (particularly surgical).

Surgical Management

  1. Explain the key features of processes undertaken to provide surgical care for a patient, including preoperative assessment, operating room processes, anaesthetic management and postoperative care
  2. Describe the key principles of common operations and procedures important to the effective surgical management of patients' problems.

Pharmacotherapeutics

  1. Use a rational approach, incorporating knowledge about safety, to select appropriate therapeutic drugs. Describe the basis of their mechanism of action, important aspects of their pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and drug interactions.

The Role of Research in Advancing Medical Knowledge:

  1. Identify and criticise how research contributes to the body of scientific knowledge available to medical practitioners.

Theme IV: Clinical skills

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (relevant to practice in medical and surgical units)
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments under direct, structured supervision
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly under structured supervision
  7. Interpret results of investigations and use data to guide patient management under structured supervision
  8. Distinguishes priority of patient care based upon urgency
  9. Generate a ranked problem list
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and select the most likely options relevant for the patient
  11. Develop management plans for common problems and conditions
  12. Select most appropriate medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient
  13. Monitor the patient, identifies common complications and plans an immediate response under structured supervision
  14. Develop and implement an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use under structured supervision
  15. Outline procedures and documentation for admissions, discharges and referrals.
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Accurately record case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats under structured supervision.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

2 x Mini Case Records (MCR) (30% each)
Integrated clinical appraisal activity (EBCP) (20%)
Online Pathology (MCQ) (20%)

Hurdle:
Although students are expected to have 100% attendance, the Faculty has determined 90% as a minimum attendance Hurdle. Therefore students are required to maintain a minimum 90% level of attendance at PBL (clinical, case-based or paper based), pathology tutorials, Evidence Based Clinical Practice (EBCP) sessions, Occupational and Environmental Medicine (OEM) sessions, Ethics and Law tutorials, Clinical skills tutorials and any simulation-based teaching and workshops. If you are unable to attend a session, you may be eligible for In Semester Special Consideration for this component of in-semester assessment. Application forms for In Semester Special Consideration are available at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/current/student-forms.html


Satisfactory participation and performance in clinical skills activities and submission of complete portfolio.

Workload requirements

Approximately 13 hours/week of structured teaching and learning, 10 hours/week of unstructured learning in clinical settings and 10 hours/week self directed learning (private study).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

MED3062 and MED3200. Must be enrolled in course 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Second semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

MED3062 is an integrated medicine/surgery curriculum based on the four themes of the medical curriculum: personal and professional development; population, society, health and illness; foundations of medicine; and clinical skills. Evidence-based educational approaches support students in acquiring appropriate knowledge, attitudes and skills in medicine, surgery, clinical skills, evidence-based clinical practice, occupational and environmental medicine, patho-physiology, pharmacology, ethics and law. Previous learning will be extended. By the end of the semester students must be capable of undertaking history and clinical examinations of patients with straightforward conditions.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

Theme 1: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Apply the legal requirements and protocols to clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Recognise issues related to justice and the role of advocacy that are evident within the health system
  4. Practice and discuss ethical decision making and consultation in clinical environments
  5. Display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Describe factors that contribute to risks and errors in health care settings and the responsibilities of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Identify the activities in clinical settings that contribute to research and quality improvement in healthcare
  10. Review and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify support strategies
  12. Use appropriate environments and strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals)
  13. Identify the roles and responsibilities of patient centred health care team members and their professions and opportunities to assist the health care team
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities
  15. Articulate own strengths, acknowledge own limitations which impact upon performance, seek support and self-advocate for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Discuss occupational and environmental factors that affect health, well-being and safety and the capacity to perform work
  2. Explain medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion
  3. Explain the rationale for a health intervention/screening program
  4. Critique appropriate strategies for disease prevention and health promotion for patients
  5. Source and interpret biostatistical information relevant to health and disease in populations across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations).
  6. Identify study designs used in population health and clinical research publications/reports/projects
  7. Describe the delivery of health care and the essential roles of systems to the individual across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  8. Discuss the rationale, methodology and application of clinical decision making processes and strategies
  9. Recognise and describe human and organisational factors relevant to risk management in health care settings
  10. Effectively communicate observations and analysis in written and oral formats.
  11. Formulate and conduct an effective search for information relevant to the clinical care of a patient
  12. Organise, manage, interpret and apply information sourced from medical research publications and popular information sources
  13. Critique data and information sourced in medical literature
  14. Define and describe a rationale for levels of evidence.

Theme III: Scientific basis of clinical practice

History/examination and Differential Diagnosis:

  1. Identify and apply the scientific bases that underpin the rational approach to eliciting a history and examining a patient in common diseases
  2. Formulate a differential diagnosis and problem list relevant to the patient.

Clinical Features, Natural history, Pathogenesis and Pathology of disease

  1. Describe the natural history, pathogenesis and morphology of pathological processes related to specific diseases and conditions. Relate these to their clinical manifestations.

Recognition of Complexity in Patients' Health and Disease:

  1. Recognize that patients can present with problems due to multiple causes and contributing factors, including psychosocial factors, which impact upon their management, care and outcomes.

Investigating Health Problems:

  1. Determine and describe the scientific rationale that underpins the selection of appropriate investigations to confirm the diagnosis and guide the management of the patient
  2. Interpret the results of investigations and relate these to the diagnosis and/or management of the patient's condition.

General Principles of Management

  1. Outline the scientific basis for the range of therapeutic approaches available to manage a patient's problem
  2. Analyse the scientific rationale that underpins medical and surgical therapies (the scientific basis of therapies and their implementation)
  3. Select appropriate management options for patients, medical (including pharmacological) and interventional (particularly surgical).

Surgical Management

  1. Explain the key features of processes undertaken to provide surgical care for a patient, including preoperative assessment, operating room processes, anaesthetic management and postoperative care
  2. Describe the key principles of common operations and procedures important to the effective surgical management of patients' problems.

Pharmacotherapeutics

  1. Use a rational approach, incorporating knowledge about safety, to select appropriate therapeutic drugs. Describe the basis of their mechanism of action, important aspects of their pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and drug interactions.

The Role of Research in Advancing Medical Knowledge:

  1. Identify and criticise how research contributes to the body of scientific knowledge available to medical practitioners.

Theme IV: Clinical skills

  1. Conduct a structured patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (relevant to practice in medical and surgical units)
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments under direct, structured supervision
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly under structured supervision
  7. Interpret results of investigations and use data to guide patient management under structured supervision
  8. Distinguishes priority of patient care based upon urgency
  9. Generate a ranked problem list
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and select the most likely options relevant for the patient
  11. Develop management plans for common problems and conditions
  12. Select most appropriate medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient
  13. Monitor the patient, identifies common complications and plans an immediate response under structured supervision
  14. Develop and implement an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use under structured supervision
  15. Outline procedures and documentation for admissions, discharges and referrals.
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Accurately record case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats under structured supervision.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

4 x Mini Case Records (MCR) (15% each)
Integrated clinical appraisal activity (EBCP) (20%)
Online Pathology (MCQ) (20%)

Hurdle:
Although students are expected to have 100% attendance, the Faculty has determined 90% as a minimum attendance Hurdle. Therefore students are required to maintain a minimum 90% level of attendance at PBL (clinical, case-based or paper based), pathology tutorials, Evidence Based Clinical Practice (EBCP) sessions, Occupational and Environmental Medicine (OEM) sessions, Ethics and Law tutorials, Clinical skills tutorials and any simulation-based teaching and workshops. If you are unable to attend a session, you may be eligible for In-Semester Special Consideration for this component of in-semester assessment. Application forms for In Semester Special Consideration are available at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/current/student-forms.html

Satisfactory participation and performance in clinical skills activities and submission of complete portfolio.

Workload requirements

Approximately 13 hours/week of structured teaching and learning, 10 hours/week unstructured learning in clinical settings and 10 hours/week self directed learning (private study).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

Must have passed an (I/W) unit in {MED3051}.

Co-requisites

MED3200 and must be enrolled in course 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Notes

Students who fail to progress in MED3051 in semester 1 must discontinue from MED3200. Unit discontinuation penalites will apply.

Synopsis

Introductory Clinical Studies integrates the learning across MED3051 and MED3062. Learning activities specific to each specialty area will be linked to the specific clinical placement and may include lectures, tutorials, case-based learning, bed- side tutorials, practical skills sessions, and specialty teaching clinics and directed learning activities.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate appropriate communication, and interpersonal and professional skills for hospital and community clinical settings
  2. Recognise legal and ethical issues relevant to the practice of medicine
  3. Recognise the principles of team-work, and the role of doctors in clinical teams
  4. Explain the economic perspective on health issues and health care
  5. Critique evaluations of a health intervention
  6. Identify organisational factors which impact on patient care and participate in quality improvement processes
  7. Identify the impact of public health policy on the delivery of health care to the individual
  8. Identify relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families
  9. Identify relevant approaches to health education, illness prevention and rehabilitatiom
  10. Apply the knowledge and concepts of basic biological, psychological and social science to common and important clinical conditions
  11. Identify biological, psychological and social factors pertinent to understanding the illness and its management
  12. Identify common and important illnesses, conditions and disorders
  13. Elicit and record an accurate clinical history appropriate for the patients and the clinical context
  14. Perform and accurately record an appropriate physical examination
  15. Develop differential diagnoses and formulate problems
  16. Competently perform selected clinical practices, techniques and procedures
  17. Formulate appropriate patient-centred management plans and discuss management issues
  18. Identify appropriate and cost-effective investigation strategies.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) x 10 stations (50%) (Hurdle)
2 x Written examination - Paper 1 (3 hours)(35%) and Paper 2 (2 hours)(15%) (EMQ/EMS)

Hurdle:
Although students are expected to have 100% attendance, the Faculty has determined 90% as a minimum attendance HURDLE requirement. If you are unable to attend a session, you may be eligible for In Semester Special Consideration for this component of in-semester assessment. Application forms for In Semester Special Consideration are available at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/current/student-forms.html; satisfactory participation and performance in clinical skills activities.

Workload requirements

2 x 18 week semesters in continuous rotations through clinical attachments.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

Must have completed 2 of MED2031, MED2042, GMA1010, GMA2000.

Co-requisites

MED3051 or MED3062. Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Second semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

MED4000 provides an overall result for Year 3B and 4C MBBS based upon achievement in Year 3B and Year 4C. A grade will be awarded for MED4000 which is based on student achievement in MED3051, MED3062, MED3200, MED4091 and MED4200.

A student must pass MED4200 and MED4190 before a grade in MED4000 will be awarded.

Outcomes

MED4000 is a hurdle requirement for successful completion of the MBBS course. Upon successful completion of this unit, students should have demonstrated the necessary integration of knowledge and skills develop during Years 1 - 4 of the medicine course.

Assessment

MED3051 (6.125%)
MED3062 (6.125%)
MED3200 (22.75%)
MED4190 (10.0%)
VIA Exam (30.0%)
MED4200 (OSCE & EMQ component, excluding VIA) (25.0%)

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

MED3051, MED3062 and MED3200 or GMB3031, GMB3042 and GMB3200.

Co-requisites

MED4190, MED4200. Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Specialty Clinical Practices provides clinical teaching in Children's Health, General Practice, Psychiatry and Women's Health. Students will undertake clinical placements in at least 2 specialty areas across the semester. Learning activities, tailored to the specific placement, may include lectures, tutorials, case-based learning, bedside tutorials, practical skills sessions, and specialty teaching clinics and directed learning activities. Students are expected to attend clinical settings, undertake independent learning activities and consolidate knowledge and skills from previous learning. EBCP and Health Economics components will be integrated with placement activities.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion, for the disciplines relevant to each of the clinical placements undertaken, students should be able to:

Theme I: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Apply the legal requirements and protocols to clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Recognise issues related to justice and the role of advocacy that are evident within the health system
  4. Practice and discuss ethical decision making and consultation in clinical environments
  5. Display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments and acts as a role model for junior students
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Explain the potential harm created by risks and errors in health care settings and the responsibilities of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Identify activities in clinical settings that contribute to research and quality improvement in healthcare
  10. Review and critically reflect upon judgments and health care practices relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and identify support strategies.
  12. Use appropriate environments and strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals)
  13. Acknowledge the roles and responsibilities of patient centred health care team members be willing to assist by taking on appropriate roles
  14. Engage in learning opportunities and participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities
  15. Articulate own strengths, acknowledge own limitations which impact upon performance, seek support and self-advocate for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Discuss occupational and environmental factors that affect health, well-being and safety and the capacity to perform work
  2. Explain medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion
  3. Explain the rationale for a health intervention/screening program
  4. Identify and explain relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families
  5. Critique appropriate strategies for disease prevention and health promotion for patients
  6. Source and interpret biostatistical information relevant to health and disease in populations across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, refugee, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  7. Compare study designs used in population health and clinical research publications/reports/projects
  8. Describe the impact of public health policy and the essential roles of systems on the delivery of health care to the individual across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, refugee, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  9. Evaluate the rationale, methodology and application of clinical decision making processes and strategies
  10. Identify organisational factors which impact on patient care and participate in quality improvement processes
  11. Explain the economic perspective on health issues and health care
  12. Synthesize and effectively communicate observations and analysis in written and oral formats appropriate for scientific/medical audiences
  13. Formulate and conduct an effective search for information relevant to the clinical care of a patient
  14. Organise, manage, interpret and apply information from medical research literature, lay press and clinical practice guidelines according to discipline guidelines/practices
  15. Critique data and information sourced in medical literature
  16. Outline the evidence used to make a clinical decision.

Theme III: Foundations of Clinical Practice

  1. Apply the knowledge and concepts of basic biological, psychological and social science to common and important clinical conditions
  2. Identify biological, psychological and social factors pertinent to understanding the illness and its management
  3. Identify common and important illnesses, conditions and disorders.

Theme IV: Clinical Skills

  1. Conduct a structured and organised patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history for neonates, babies, children, adolescents, and adults
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (relevant to practice in general practice, psychiatry, women's health and children's health)
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations and use to guide patient management
  8. Prioritise patient care in order of urgency under structured supervision
  9. Generate a ranked problem list
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and justify the most likely options relevant for the patient
  11. Develop and justify management plans for common problems and conditions for a patient whose illness remains undifferentiated
  12. Select and justify their choice of medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient
  13. Monitor the patient, recognise common complications and plan an immediate response under structured supervision
  14. Develop and implements an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use
  15. Perform admissions, discharges and referrals including documentation and patient preparation
  16. Provide structured and effective case presentations
  17. Accurately record case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Summative assessment tasks (written and practical) specific for the discipline area of the clinical attachments (i.e. Children's Health, General Practice Women's Health, Psychiatry) with a total of 24 assessment workload points for in-semester assessment (100%)

Hurdle requirements for each area of clinical attachment (ie Children's Health, General Practice Women's Health) such as specified clinical tasks and completion of logbooks. Successful completion of web-based Evidence-Based Clinical Practice, Health Economics, and Health Systems Management components.
80% minimum attendance hurdle requirement.
If you are unable to attend a session, you may be eligible for In Semester Special Consideration for this component of in-semester assessment. Application forms for In Semester Special Consideration are available at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/current/student-forms.html

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

MED3051, MED3062 and MED3200 or GMB3031, GMB3042 and GMB3200.

Co-requisites

MED4000 and MED4200. Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Integrated Clinical Studies builds upon learning in the specialty clinical areas of Children's Health, General Practice, Psychiatry and Women's Health. Students will undertake clinical placements in each specialty clinical areas across the year. Learning activities specific to each specialty area will be linked to the specific clinical placement and may include lectures, tutorials, case-based learning, bedside tutorials, practical skills sessions, and specialty teaching clinics and directed learning activities. Students are expected to consolidate knowledge and skills through both experiential learning in clinical settings and self directed study.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion, for the disciplines relevant to each of the clinical placements undertaken, students should be able to:

Theme I: Personal and Professional Development

  1. Demonstrate appropriate communication, and interpersonal and professional skills for hospital and community clinical settings
  2. Recognise legal and ethical issues relevant to the practice of medicine
  3. Recognise the principles of team-work, and the role of doctors in clinical teams.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Explain the economic perspective on health issues and health care
  2. Critique evaluations of a health intervention
  3. Identify organisational factors which impact on patient care and participate in quality improvement processes
  4. Identify the impact of public health policy on the delivery of health care to the individual
  5. Identify relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families
  6. Identify relevant approaches to health education, illness prevention and rehabilitation.

Theme III: Foundations of Clinical Practice

  1. Apply the knowledge and concepts of basic biological, psychological and social science to common and important clinical conditions
  2. Identify biological, psychological and social factors pertinent to understanding the illness and its management
  3. Identify common and important illnesses, conditions and disorders.

Theme IV: Clinical Skills

  1. Elicit and record an accurate clinical history appropriate for the patients and the clinical context
  2. Perform and accurately record an appropriate physical examination
  3. Develop differential diagnoses and formulate problems
  4. Competently perform selected clinical practices, techniques and procedures
  5. Formulate appropriate patient-centred management plans and discuss management issues
  6. Identify appropriate and cost-effective investigation strategies.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Summative assessment tasks:
OSCEs (40%)
Written examinations (40%)
Written VIA (20%)

Attendance: 80% attendance at clinical attachments.
If you are unable to attend a session, you may be eligible for In Semester Special Consideration for this component of in-semester assessment. Application forms for In Semester Special Consideration are available at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/current/student-forms.html

Workload requirements

This is a 24 point unit over 2 x18 week semesters in continuous rotations through clinical attachments. 80% minimum attendance hurdle requirement.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

MED3051, MED3062, MED3200 or GMB3031, GMB3042 and GMB3200.

Co-requisites

MED4000 and (MED4171 or MED4182). Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Megan Wallace and Dr Tony White

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester to First semester 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)
  • Summer semester A to Semester one 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit aims to develop the two most common skills that are required for the communication of medical research proposals and medical research findings. Students will develop their written communication skills by writing a review of the literature review developing a strong justification for their aim and hypothesis. Students will develop their oral communication skills by giving an oral presentation and answering questions on their research proposal, early in the Honours year.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Review and evaluate the clinical and scientific literature relevant to the field of research.
  2. Synthesise the relevant literature in relation to the research question.
  3. Refine a research question grounded in the critical review of the literature.
  4. Devise appropriate research methodology to address the research question.
  5. Justify the proposed methodology in relation to the research question.
  6. Communicate the critical arguments in the literature in relation to the research question and the proposed methodology to a wider professional audience.

Assessment

Progress report (Hurdle)
Literature review (<7500 words) (75%) (Hurdle)
Department oral presentation (25%)

Workload requirements

Average weekly workload of 12 hours per week comprised of library searches, reading, preparation of presentations and writing the literature review. The student will interact with and seek feedback from their supervisor about the overall structure of the presentation and written literature review but the student will largely be self-directed.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Medical Science (Honours) degree.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Megan Wallace and Dr Tony White

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester to First semester 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)
  • Summer semester A to Semester one 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit allows students to undertake a supervised research project aimed at identifying and addressing a gap in medical research knowledge. It is designed to give students a strong foundation in the principles and practice of research. It will also enable students to develop a wide variety of skills including data analysis and communication of medical and scientific ideas in oral presentations and a written thesis. Students will be able to select from a wide range of project proposals that will enable them to pursue a specific area of interest working with their chosen supervisor.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Develop and implement research methodology.
  2. Collect data in accordance with the moral, ethical and legal responsibilities of clinical and scientific investigation.
  3. Organise and analyse data, using appropriate statistical tests where appropriate.
  4. Synthesise the relevant literature in relation to the research question.
  5. Present and interpret the data collected and its significance in relation to the existing literature.
  6. Generate defensible conclusions based upon the significance of the research findings.
  7. Demonstrate writing skills that meet the academic standards associated with a thesis.
  8. Communicate research findings to a wider professional audience.
  9. Develop confidence in their ability to develop into a practitioner of evidence-based medicine.

Assessment

Department oral presentation (5%)
Minor thesis (12,000 - 15,000 words) (80%) (Hurdle)
Faculty presentations: Oral presentation (5 minutes) (7.5%) and poster presentation (10 minutes) (7.5%)

Workload requirements

Average weekly workload of 36 hours per week comprised of library searches, reading, preparation of presentations writing research thesis and practical research activities (eg data collection and collation, laboratory work, data analysis and review). The student may require training in technical skills by members of their research group or collaborators, but should then be largely self-directed to collect and analyze their data. The student will interact with and seek feedback from their supervisor about the overall structure of the Thesis, Departmental Oral and Faculty Presentations but the student will largely be self-directed.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Medical Science (Honours) degree.

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at:


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • First semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

MED5091 is focused on facilitating the transition of students into the medical workplace as beginning interns. Students will participate in a range of learning experiences which are designed to substantially enhance their clinical reasoning, diagnostic and case management skills. Students will participate in supervised clinical practice and related learning activities (learning modules). Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to broaden their knowledge and skills in self selected areas of clinical practice which may include electing a remote community, health or medicine related field.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the unit, students are expected to be able to:

Theme I: Professional attributes and behaviour

  1. Comply with legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Articulate issues related to justice and act as an advocate within the health system
  4. Use ethical decision making and consultation in clinical practice including complex situations
  5. Consistently display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments and acts as a role model for junior students
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify strategies to address the potential harm created by risks and errors in health care settings and comply with the requirements of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Engage in research and quality improvement activities in clinical settings where possible
  10. Evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practice relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and refer them to appropriate support.
  12. Arrange appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals)
  13. Actively contribute to the health care team to maximize the team's effectiveness by participating as a student member
  14. Engage in learning and teaching opportunities, participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities and mentor junior students
  15. Evaluate strengths, acknowledge own limitations that impact upon professional performance and self-advocate and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme II: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Analyze social, environmental and occupational factors that impact on the capacity to perform work
  2. Use medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion
  3. Evaluate a health intervention/screening program
  4. Identify and evaluate relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families
  5. Justify selection of a health promotion strategy/program
  6. Source, interpret and evaluate biostatistical information relevant to health and disease in populations across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  7. Critique study designs used in population health and clinical research publications/reports/projects
  8. Describe the impact of public health policy and the essential roles of systems on the delivery of health care to the individual across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  9. Justify clinical decision making processes and strategies at both individual patient and healthcare system levels
  10. Participate in patient health care quality improvement activities
  11. Synthesize and effectively communicate observations and analysis in written and oral formats appropriate for scientific/medical audiences
  12. Evaluate and critique data and information relevant to the care and management of a clinical problem of a patient
  13. Organise and manage information from medical research literature, lay press and clinical practice guidelines according to discipline guidelines/practices
  14. Evaluate research data and evidence sourced in medical and health care literature
  15. Justify the evidence used to make clinical decisions.

Theme III: Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice

  1. Use knowledge of the causative factors and pathophysiology in clinical reasoning
  2. Identify and assimilate presenting problems in the development of appropriate therapeutic treatments and a management plan
  3. Describe the acute, chronic, ambulatory and psychological contexts of illness and analyse how these influence the clinical presentation and management.

Theme IV: Clinical Skills

  1. Conduct a structured and organised patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history for neonates, babies, children, adolescents, adults and the elderly
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (in medical units, surgical units, a specialty unit and aged care)
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations and use to guide patient management
  8. Prioritises patient care in order of urgency
  9. Generate a ranked problem list
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and justify the most likely options relevant for the patient
  11. Develop and justify management plans for common problems and conditions an for a patient whose illness remains undifferentiated
  12. Selects and justifies their choice of medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient, including empirical choice of 'best guess' antibiotic
  13. Monitors the patient, recognises common complications and plans and justifies an immediate response under structured supervision
  14. Develops, implements and justifies an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use
  15. Performs admissions, discharges and referrals including documentation and patient preparation
  16. Provides structured and effective case presentations and justifies reasoning
  17. Accurately records case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

There will be multiple approaches to assessment in MED5091 as follows: Apart from the PIA 'in-training' assessment, which will be graded, all assessment tasks will be a "hurdle" requirement.
Each assessment item will need to be successfully completed to Pass the unit.
1. Formative assessment;
2. Moderated online discussions;
3. Case presentations;
4. Clinical Knowledge Test;
5. Pre-Intern Appraisal (PIA);
6. Portfolio.

Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% tutorials and clinical placements to pass this unit.
If you are unable to attend a session, you may be eligible for In Semester Special Consideration for this component of in-semester assessment. Application forms for In Semester Special Consideration are available at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/current/student-forms.html

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

MED5092, MED5102 and MED5100. Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Second semester (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

MED5092 is focused on facilitating the transition of students into the medical workplace as beginning interns. Students will participate in a range of learning experiences which are designed to substantially enhance their clinical reasoning, diagnostic and case management skills. Students will participate in supervised clinical practice and related learning activities (learning modules). Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to broaden their knowledge and skills in self selected areas of clinical practice which may include electing a remote community, health or medicine related field.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the unit, students should be able to:

Theme I: Professional attributes and behaviour

  1. Comply with legal requirements and protocols in clinical practice including documentation, patient care and safety
  2. Respect and maintain privacy and confidentiality (peers, university & health care staff, external stakeholders, patients, clients)
  3. Articulate issues related to justice and act as an advocate within the health system
  4. Use ethical decision making and consultation in clinical practice including complex situations
  5. Consistently display a respectful, non-judgemental and empathic approach to others
  6. Maintain an appropriate standard of professional behaviour including demeanour, appearance and meeting commitments and acts as a role model for junior students
  7. Communicate clearly, effectively and appropriately in oral, written and electronic formats
  8. Identify strategies to address the potential harm created by risks and errors in health care settings and comply with the requirements of health care professionals in ensuring the quality of patient care
  9. Engage in research and quality improvement activities in clinical settings where possible
  10. Evaluate and critically reflect upon judgements and health care practice relating to patient outcomes
  11. Recognise peers experiencing difficulty and refer them to appropriate support
  12. Arrange appropriate environments and use strategies for sensitive and effective communication and interaction with others in clinical environments (patients and carers, peers and health care professionals)
  13. Actively contribute to the health care team to maximize the team's effectiveness by participating as a student member
  14. Engage in learning and teaching opportunities, participate in peer learning, leadership and teaching activities and mentor junior students
  15. Evaluate strengths, acknowledge own limitations that impact upon professional performance and self-advocate and seek support for improvement
  16. Take responsibility for own self-care and health issues.

Theme III: Population, Society, Health and Illness

  1. Analyze social, environmental and occupational factors that impact on the capacity to perform work
  2. Use medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion
  3. Evaluate a health intervention/screening program
  4. Identify and evaluate relevant programs and community resources available to patients and their families
  5. Justify selection of a health promotion strategy/program
  6. Source, interpret and evaluate biostatistical information relevant to health and disease in populations across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  7. Critique study designs used in population health and clinical research publications/reports/projects
  8. Describe the impact of public health policy and the essential roles of systems on the delivery of health care to the individual across a range of contexts (e.g. rural, indigenous, vulnerable/'at-risk' populations)
  9. Justify clinical decision making processes and strategies at both individual patient and healthcare system levels
  10. Participate in patient health care quality improvement activities
  11. Synthesize and effectively communicate observations and analysis in written and oral formats appropriate for scientific/medical audiences
  12. Evaluate and critique data and information relevant to the care and management of a clinical problem of a patient
  13. Organise and manage information from medical research literature, lay press and clinical practice guidelines according to discipline guidelines/practices
  14. Evaluate research data and evidence sourced in medical and health care literature
  15. Justify the evidence used to make clinical decisions.

Theme III: Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice

  1. Use knowledge of the causative factors and pathophysiology in clinical reasoning
  2. Identify and assimilate presenting problems in the development of appropriate therapeutic treatments and a management plan
  3. Describe the acute, chronic, ambulatory and psychological contexts of illness and analyse how these influence the clinical presentation and management.

Theme IV: Clinical Skills

  1. Conduct a structured and organised patient centred interview
  2. Elicit a structured, comprehensive and logical history for neonates, babies, children, adolescents, adults and the elderly
  3. Perform an appropriate examination (in medical units, surgical units, a specialty unit and aged care)
  4. Perform specified clinical procedures and tasks in clinical environments
  5. Justify selection of investigations for the patient's presenting problems or conditions
  6. Request/order relevant investigations correctly
  7. Interpret results of specified investigations and use to guide patient management
  8. Prioritises patient care in order of urgency
  9. Generate a ranked problem list
  10. Develop a differential diagnosis (list) and justify the most likely options relevant for the patient
  11. Develop and justify management plans for common problems and conditions an for a patient whose illness remains undifferentiated
  12. Selects and justifies their choice of medication, dose and mode of administration for the patient, including empirical choice of 'best guess' antibiotic
  13. Monitors the patient, recognises common complications and plans and justifies an immediate response under structured supervision
  14. Develops, implements and justifies an individualised patient management plan for fluid, electrolyte and blood product use
  15. Performs admissions, discharges and referrals including documentation and patient preparation
  16. Provides structured and effective case presentations and justifies reasoning
  17. Accurately records case details and clinical activities in appropriate formats.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

There will be multiple approaches to assessment in MED5092 as follows: Apart from the PIA 'in-training' assessment, which will be graded, all assessment tasks will be a 'hurdle' requirement. Each assessment item will need to be successfully completed to Pass the unit.
1. Formative assessment;
2. Moderated online discussions;
3. Case presentations;
4. Clinical Knowledge Test;
5. Pre-Intern Appraisal (PIA);
6. Portfolio.

Hurdle: Students must attend a minimum of 80% tutorials and clinical placements to pass this unit.
If you are unable to attend a session, you may be eligible for In Semester Special Consideration for this component of in-semester assessment. Application forms for In Semester Special Consideration are available at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/current/student-forms.html

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

2012 pre-reqs: MED4071, MED4082 and MED4000
2014 pre-reqs: MED5091 or GMD5071.

Co-requisites

MED5100 and MED5102. Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Associate Professor Christopher Wright

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit indicates the honours grade obtained by a student on completion of the five years of the MBBS degree. Students are not eligible for honours if they take more than five years (not including intermitted years) to complete the course. The grade is derived from a formula approved by faculty board as outlined below.

Assessment

MED2000 or GMA2000 (30%)
MED4000 or GMC4000 (60%)
Year 5D (10%)

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

MED4171, MED4182, MED4200, MED4000 or GMC4151, GMC4162, GMC4200 and GMC4000.

Co-requisites

MED5091, MED5092 and MED5102. Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Monash School of Medicine

Coordinator(s)

Dr Julia Harrison and Dr Stuart Marshall

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Malaysia

  • Full year (extended) 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Medical practitioners are frequently required to respond to emerging and consolidating innovations and policies related to clinical practice. MED5102 further develops the concept of 'readiness to practice' and focuses upon the development of students' understanding of the principles of Patient Safety and the related clinical competencies. The unit will provide students with an understanding of the role of research in Patient Safety and the application of these principles and practices in diverse contexts. The unit will have the capacity to respond to other issues/innovations/policy changes as they arise in medical practice.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the principles of Patient Safety;
  2. Recognise individual practitioner, patient and institutional methods and strategies used to ensure Patient Safety principles are upheld;
  3. Demonstrate competence in Patient Safety practices in simulated settings;
  4. Contribute actively to the development and implementation of Patient Safety practices; and
  5. Critique and apply current scientific and medical research related to Patient Safety.

Fieldwork

This unit requires students to undertake off-campus clinical placements. In the clinical setting students will have an opportunity to apply theory to practice under supervision. Attendance is mandatory for the clinical component of each unit.

Assessment

Students will not be individually graded, but all assessments will be a hurdle requirement. Each assessment item will need to be successfully completed to pass this unit.
1. Observed Patient Safety Skills Assessment
2. Student group presentations
3. Online assessment tasks

Hurdle requirement: Students must attend a minimum of 80% tutorials and clinical placements to pass this unit.
If you are unable to attend a session, you may be eligible for In Semester Special Consideration for this component of in-semester assessment. Application forms for In Semester Special Consideration are available at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/current/student-forms.html

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Peter Barton (Clayton), Professor Parasakthi Navaratnam (Malaysia)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Medicine

Prerequisites

2012 pre-reqs: MED4071, MED4082 and MED4000
2014 pre-reqs: MED4171, MED4182, MED4200 and MED4000 or GMC4151, GMC4162, GMC4200 and GMC4000.

Co-requisites

MED5091, MED5092 and MED5100. Must be enrolled in courses 0040, 1074, 3856, 3952, 4531, 4533 or 4532.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Offered

King's College London

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Overseas

Synopsis

This unit is used by the faculty to enrol students undertaking outbound exchange studies at a host institution. Students will not be able to enrol in this unit via WES. The faculty will manage the enrolment of students undertaking an outbound exchange program to ensure fees and credit are processed accurately.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Helen Hall

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Students learning will focus on well women's experiences of recognising pregnancy, their response to becoming pregnant, the changes encountered from early pregnancy through to the early weeks after birth, the midwife's roles relating to health assessment, health promotion, primary level health counselling, and working with well women during childbearing.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply theoretical knowledge of midwifery to a woman-centred approach to midwifery practice
  2. Describe working with women in childbearing using the theoretical understandings gained in science units
  3. Demonstrate developing clinical and communication skills necessary to provide women-centred midwifery
  4. Recognise the importance of women's social context in the provision of midwifery services
  5. Demonstrate beginning skills in physical assessment of women and their babies at various stages of pregnancy
  6. Assist women to understand breastfeeding including offering support to establish successful breastfeeding
  7. Outline the relative merits of different choices in infant nutrition
  8. Document the ongoing relationship with the women they are following through in a way that reflects their own involvement and actions and the rationale for these
  9. Demonstrate midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 40 hours.

Assessment

Practice enquiry (written assignment) (2,500 - 3,000 words) (40%)
Examination (2 hours) (60%) (Hurdle)
Clinical skills assessment (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

12 hours per week over 11 weeks plus clinical placement.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

TBA

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites

BMA1901 and NUR1101 or NUR1010.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Gayle McLelland

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Synopsis

This unit will provide the foundational knowledge required by midwifery students to effectively care for women during preconception through to early parenting. The focus will be on the knowledge required by midwives to be able to apply both the physiological and psychological adaptations of women during pregnancy, birth, and the first weeks after birth.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the female and male reproductive systems;
  2. List key events in the continuum of embryonic and fetal development including the adaptation of the baby at birth;
  3. Describe the anatomical, physiological and hormonal changes and processes that occur in the woman's body during pregnancy, labour, birth and the puerperium;
  4. Describe the process of labour and birth;
  5. Briefly describe the anatomy of the breast and physiology of lactation;
  6. Describe the routine screening and basic diagnostic tests in pregnancy assessment;
  7. Explain the connection between normal physiological of pregnancy and the minor disorders of pregnancy.

Assessment

2 x Paper based in class test (1 hour each) (1,000 words each) (Tested in week 4 & week 8) (30%)
Exam (2 hours) (50%) (Hurdle)
Group assignment including peer assessment, group assessment & lecturer assessment (20%)

Students must achieve a pass in the examination to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

2 hours tutorial each week, 3 - 4 hours each week directed online learning activities.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

TBA

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Co-requisites

BMA1901 and must be enrolled in courses 3563, 3953 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Bethany Carr

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Flexible)

Synopsis

The focus of this 12 credit point unit is to develop midwifery knowledge and skills related to working with women throughout labour and birth. This unit will enable the student to develop skills and confidence clinical assessment of the woman and her baby. Assessment of labour progress, common interventions and pain management are explored. Students will also analyse the mechanisms of labour, and be introduced to the management of childbirth complications. They will be provided with both 'simulated' and 'real' opportunities to develop skills and knowledge that will enable them to provide effective care to birthing women. The clinical practice component will provide students with opportunities to incorporate theoretical learning directly into midwifery practice.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge regarding comprehensive assessment and care of a woman and her baby during the birth process;
  2. Critically analyse the philosophical, physiological, psychosocial, spiritual, cultural and environmental factors influencing the birth process;
  3. Discuss the midwife's scope of practice and collaboration with other members of the healthcare team, when working with women during childbirth;
  4. Describe variations from normal that may arise during pregnancy, labour, birth and the postnatal period and the midwife's role in managing these
  5. Critique the implications of obstetric interventions, and use of technology upon the woman and her family;
  6. Demonstrate understanding and interpretation of women's rights, values and cultural beliefs in creating an appropriate and culturally safe environment for women and their partners to birth; and
  7. Demonstrate beginning level competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Fieldwork

Students are required to participate in 160 hours clinical placement. They are also required to continue with their Continuity of Care relationships with women (~20 hours per woman) x 4.

Assessment

Written assignment (3,000 words) (50%)
Exam (3 hours) (50%)
Continuity of care clinical (20 hours x 4) (Pass / Fail)
Continuity of care case report (500 words x 4) (Pass / Fail)
Clinical placement (160 hours) with clinical practice assessment (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

Lectures: 2 hour x 8 weeks = 16 hours
Tutorials: 2 hours x 8 weeks = 16 hours
Self directed study: 40 hours
Clinical: 160 hours
Continuity of Care clinical hours: 80 hours
Total: 312 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites

Prohibitions

MID2004, MID2105.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Helen Hall

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the broad range of therapies listed under the umbrella term of 'complementary and alternative medicine '(CAM). Students will have the opportunity to consider the underlying philosophy and reasons why the treatments have become increasingly popular in a contemporary health care setting. Using an evidence based approach, the benefits and risks of the major modalities will be considered. The concept of 'integrative medicine' and the role and responsibilities of health care professionals will also be explored.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the history and philosophy of CAM
  2. Explore the reasons people integrate CAM into their health care
  3. Identify the advantages and challenges of an evidence based approach to CAM
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the major CAM modalities
  5. Critically discuss the role of CAM in modern health care
  6. Describe the ethical, legal and professional issues when integrating CAM into midwifery/nursing practice.

Assessment

Written assignment (3,000 words) (50%)
Oral presentation with summary handout (Group activity) (40%)
Workshop participation (10%)

Workload requirements

Attendance at 4 x 1/2 day workshops, plus online activities and self-directed learning.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Gayle McLelland

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This theory and practice unit introduces students to the complexities of childbearing and emergency birthing challenges that women may experience during pregnancy, labour and birth and the first weeks after birth. The focus is on students developing their knowledge and skills relating to midwifery and obstetric management of these challenges. Emphasis is given to the collaborative role of the midwife, referral, use of medical technology, obstetric intervention, and the implications for women, their babies, and midwives. Whilst recognising the role of other healthcare practitioners, midwifery care will be central. Students will be introduced to the use of medical technology and obstetrical intervention whilst maintaining a woman-centred focus.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Examine the role of the midwife and collaborative practice in the context of challenges and deviations from normal and interventions during the childbearing period;
  2. Discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis and, evidence for the management of common obstetric and medical conditions that affect maternity care;
  3. Develop and implement plans for collaborative care for women experiencing complex challenges in childbearing within a multidisciplinary health care team and the woman;
  4. Discuss and critique screening tests, technologies and interventions during pregnancy, labour and birth;
  5. Identify and propose patient management appropriate to a range of emergency situations in pregnancy, birth and the post-partum period;
  6. Identify and manage selected obstetric emergencies in a simulated setting;
  7. Discuss the effects of complex physical health problems during pregnancy, labour, birth and after childbirth;
  8. Discuss grief situations and develop strategies to support women and their families following pregnancy loss;
  9. Document the ongoing relationship with the women and families that the midwifery student observed in a way that reflects their own involvement and actions.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 160 hours.

Assessment

Essay (2,000 words) (30%)
Multimedia presentation and peer assessment with 1,000 words brochure (20%)
Exam (2 hours) (50%) (Hurdle)
2 x Continuity of care reports (500 words each) (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)
Emergency clinical skills competency assessment (Hurdle)
Clinical placement with clinical assessment 80 hours (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

Lectures - 2 hours per week (24 hours)
Tutorials/Clinical Laboratories - 2 hours per week (24 hours)
Online Guided Learning Activities - 2 hours per week (24hours)
Clinical placement - 2 days per week (16 hours) for 10 weeks (160 hours)
Student directed study - 80 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites

Course 3562: MID2102; Courses 3953 or 4514: MID1002, and either MID2105 or MID2010

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 3562 or 3953 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Janet Jones

Offered

Gippsland

  • First semester 2016 (Flexible)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to childbearing and emergency birthing obstacles that women may experience. Midwifery and obstetric management of childbearing obstacles will be explored. Emphasis is given to the collaborative role of the midwife, referral, use of medical technology, obstetric intervention, and the implications for women, their babies, and midwives.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. evaluate collaborative practice within challenges, disturbances and interventions during childbearing
  2. examine screening tests and innovative technologies available to women during pregnancy
  3. examine the pathophysiology, diagnosis, evidence for care and expected outcomes associated with selected challenges in pregnancy
  4. discuss the causes, identification, effects and management of disturbances in the rhythms of labour and birth
  5. identify interventions in pregnancy, labour and birth and their management from the perspective of the midwife and health care team
  6. identify factors that indicate potential for maternal and/or unborn baby life threatening emergencies
  7. describe the management of a range of emergency situations in pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period
  8. describe the range of physical health problems women may experience following childbirth
  9. discuss grief situations related to women, men and the midwife following pregnancy loss
  10. demonstrate beginning level midwifery competency based upon the ANMAC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Written assignment (2,000 words) (30%)
Guided study activitiy (1,000 words) (20%)
Examination (2 hours) (50%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites

MID2004, and MID2006 or MID2105.

Co-requisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Janet Jones

Offered

Gippsland

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This practice unit complements the theory unit Childbearing obstacles and will focus on students developing their knowledge and skills relating to the obstacles women may experience during pregnancy, labour and birth and the first weeks after birth. Emphasis is given to the recognition of problems and the collaborative and referral role of the midwife. Whilst recognising the role of other healthcare practitioners, midwifery care will be central. Students will be introduced to the use of medical technology and obstetrical intervention whilst maintaining a woman-centred focus.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. apply appropriate knowledge in the care of a woman experiencing obstacles in childbearing;
  2. develop plans of care for women experiencing obstacles in childbearing;
  3. demonstrate understanding of specific conditions that affect pregnancy, labour and birth, and the first few weeks after birth;
  4. evaluate the implications of obstetric interventions in maternity care;
  5. critique the use of technology in maternity care;
  6. demonstrate beginning skills in the use of technology in midwifery and obstetric practice;
  7. demonstrate the ability to manage emergencies;
  8. demonstrate the ability to practice within a multidisciplinary team;
  9. facilitate woman's access to appropriate community resources;
  10. document the ongoing relationship with the women and families that the midwifery student follows through in a way that reflects their own involvement and actions and the rationale for these, as well as the families' actions and attitudes and responses to midwifery care; and
  11. demonstrate midwifery competency based on the selected ACMI Competency Standards.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 160 hours.

Assessment

Reflective exercise (1,500 - 2,000 words) (40%)
Creative project and presentation (30%)
Emergency skill assessment - OSCEs x 2 (Note: this is a hurdle requirement)
Associated class test (30%)
OSCE (Pass / Fail) (Must be passed in order to pass the unit)

Workload requirements

Lectures - 2 hours per week (24 hours)
Tutorials/Clinical Laboratories - 2 hours per week (24 hours)
Clinical placement - 160 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites

Two units in MID2004, MID2006 or MID2105.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kay McCauley

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Online)

Synopsis

Through introduction of the broader womens health context, the unit explores the primary and collaborative role of the midwife working with women experiencing common women's health problems and their responses to these experiences. Students will be introduced to the physical and psychological aspects associated with selected womens health problems. The issue of women's experience of 'what is happening to me' and 'woman's sense of self' will be explored. The focus will be on fostering a positive self-image for women through facilitating participation in informed decision-making and taking responsibility for self-care and optimising wellness.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the essential components to be considered when performing a comprehensive women's health assessment;
  2. Discuss the principles of primary health care in the promotion of health and wellness with diverse groups of women experiencing treatment for a range of women's health problems;
  3. Discuss common health problems women may experience throughout various life stages;
  4. Describe physical and psychological aspects associated with selected women's health problems; identify the range of responses a woman may experience when confronted with a body altering health problem;
  5. Explore strategies to promote women's participation in informed decision-making and taking responsibility for self-care;
  6. Relate reflective practice and the implementation of evidence-informed care to quality care in midwifery practice; and demonstrate beginning level midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Assessment

Online quiz (10%)
Written assignment (2,000 words) (30%)
Examination (60%) (Hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites

MID1001, MID1002, MID1003, MID2004, MID2006, MID2102.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Midwifery, Honours degree of Bachelor of Midwifery or Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic).


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Suzanne Willey

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides students with a comprehensive and clinically meaningful final preparation for transition to practice as a competent beginning level midwife. The unit provides students with the opportunity to explore in detail a range of midwifery and medically led models of care and the midwifery leadership necessary to promote the profession, providing childbearing women with choice in the care they receive. Students are provided with the opportunity to explore contemporary midwifery practice, regulatory and professional issues and identify evidence informed midwifery practices.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Reflect critically upon the role that women-centred care and midwifery led models of care play in the Australian maternity care context;
  2. Appraise contemporary and evidence-based midwifery practice;
  3. Discuss challenges of autonomous practice and midwifery leadership;
  4. Demonstrate skill in ethical decision making in the identification of appropriate solutions to complex midwifery issues;
  5. Demonstrate proficiency in the implementation of planned midwifery care; and
  6. Demonstrate midwifery competency based on the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 160 hours.

Assessment

Essay (3,000 words) (40%)
Case study (3,000 words) (60%)
Clinical placement with clinical assessment (160 hours) (Pass / Fail)
Clinical portfolio with all minimum requirements completed (Pass / Fail)

Students must pass the clinical assessment to pass the unit. Students must submit the clinical portfolio for audit in order to be course completed.

Workload requirements

This is a flexible unit with a number of compulsory on campus workshops.
One four hour orientation session and three four hour compulsory on-campus workshops: 16 hours
Self-directed learning: 60 hours
Clinical placement: 160 hours
Total: 316 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Carolyn Bailey

Offered

Gippsland

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This practice unit provides students with a comprehensive and clinically meaningful final preparation for transition to practice as a competent first level registered midwife, in an area of their choosing. The unit utilises principles of adult learning to enable students to explore an area of special interest such as midwifery practice in rural and remote locations, neonatal intensive care nursery and care of childbearing women at risk.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Be able to apply principles of adult learning to address an identified learning need;
  2. Explain factors affecting communication and negotiation in the midwifery context;
  3. Synthesise a broad range of knowledge from previous subjects to demonstrate an integrated bio-psychosocial insight into a selected area of midwifery practice; and
  4. Selectively apply current research findings relevant to the nominated field of study.

Clinical Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate safe midwifery practice based on sound theoretical knowledge and reasoning;
  2. Perform detailed physical health assessment of childbearing women and newborns;
  3. Resolve midwifery practice problems appropriately;
  4. Proficiently implement midwifery care as planned;
  5. Demonstrate sensitivity to the cultural dimensions of care;
  6. Practice with increasing independence and incorporate current research findings into clinical practice; and
  7. Demonstrate midwifery competency based on the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 240 hours.

Assessment

6 x Online discussions to expand and explore knowledge (500 words each) (30%)
Complex case study of mother and baby (3,000 words) (70%)
Clinical assessment (Pass / Fail) (Students must pass the clinical assessment to pass the unit)

Workload requirements

4 hours teacher directed learning and 240 hours clinical placement.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Midwifery or Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms.Gayle McLelland (Peninsula), Ms Janet Jones (Gippsland)

Offered

Gippsland

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Synopsis

The unit will prepare students with the theoretical knowledge and skills to assess, examine and initiate emergency management on the newborn infant. Anatomy and physiology relating to the newborn infant and human lactation will be explored. Students will develop an understanding of multidisciplinary care and collaborative practice in the management of sick newborn infants in a Level II Nursery. In addition, students will critically analyze all nutritional choices for well and sick babies and develop an understanding of the socio-cultural elements surrounding the care of newborn and their families.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Critically examine the social-cultural context in the provision of care to babies and their families in Australia and globally;
  2. Examine the changes in anatomy and physiology of the fetus and newborn infant and describe successful adaptation to the extrauterine environment;
  3. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the human female breast and process of lactation;
  4. Apply strategies which promote and protect breast feeding;
  5. Explore the nutritional choices available and the factors that impact upon women's decision making regarding feeding their babies;
  6. Identify normal variations in the newborn period and provide appropriate management strategies;
  7. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in resuscitating and stabilising a baby;
  8. Identify the circumstances and conditions that may necessitate admission of a baby to a Level Two nursery;
  9. Evaluate the Level Two Nursery environment and its impact upon the woman, her baby and family;
  10. Utilise the clinical decision making process to demonstrate evidence-based knowledge and understanding of the care required by the baby and the family;
  11. Demonstrate an appreciation of the family's need for privacy, dignity and respect, as well as their right to be informed and to make decisions regarding care of their baby;
  12. Demonstrate the ability to practice within a multidisciplinary team in an environment of complexity;
  13. Implement evidence-based holistic care for women, babies and their families across the childbearing process;
  14. Employ reflective practice strategies to develop understanding of diverse midwifery practice; and
  15. Demonstrate midwifery competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for Midwives.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 160 hours.

Assessment

Written assignment (2,500 words) (25%)
Case study (2,500 words) (25%)
Exam (3 hours) (50%) (Students must achieve a pass in the final examination to pass the unit) (Hurdle)
Clinical practice assessment (Pass / Fail) (Students must pass clinical placement to pass the unit) (Hurdle)
Linked neonatal skills assessments x 5 (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories: 54 hours
Clinical: 160 hours
Individual study: 162 hours
Total: 312 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites

{MID2004, MID2105} OR Must have passed {MID2010}.

Prohibitions

MID2107, MID2108, MID2109.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

TBA (Peninsula) and Ms Janet Jones (Gippsland)

Offered

Gippsland

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit focuses on the interplay between the socio-political issues that pervade the clinical arena of midwifery and population health consideration. These include for example how economic and class factors impact on vulnerable populations who are pregnant or giving birth. It facilitates the student to a greater understanding of vulnerability in childbearing women. The unit also includes issues such as violence within the family, child abuse, sexual assault drug abuse and associated pathologies. The special needs of Indigenous women and their families will be addressed. Additionally, the birthing needs of refugees and asylum seekers and their families will be explored. The emphasis of the unit will be grounded in the philosophy of adult learning encouraging the student to be self-directed in the identification of their learning needs.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify common vulnerabilities within society and how these impact on childbearing women;
  2. Interpret the incidence, prevalence and clinical relevance of population health information presented in health research publications;
  3. Develop a range of problem solving, decision-making and time management strategies that enhance the organisation of clinical midwifery care to vulnerable groups of childbearing women;
  4. Incorporate and evaluate ethically and culturally relevant midwifery interventions for vulnerable women across the birthing journey including cultural identity and racism;
  5. Critically reflect on their own actions in the professional partnership role with vulnerable women and on the nature of midwifery practice in relation to clients' health situations;
  6. Develop strategies of leadership, management, teamwork and interdisciplinary collaboration in the provision of quality midwifery care when being with vulnerable women, and
  7. Demonstrate beginning level competency based upon the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Midwife.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 80 hours.

Assessment

Poster and abstract and presentation that address a socio-political issue that influences childbearing women, families and midwifery practice (1,500 words) (60%)
Reflective essay on specific vulnerabilities of the student's choice, that affect childbearing women and their families (2,500 words) (20%)
Critical analysis of a contemporary journal article that addresses socio-political issues of vulnerability in midwifery practice (2,000 words) (20%)
Clinical practice (Clinical hurdles) (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

Lectures 2 hours/week and tutes 2 hours/week x 6 weeks (12 hours lectures, 12 hours tutes) and clinical placement 80 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Midwifery

Prerequisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Lorraine Walker

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This clinical unit focuses on the preparation of the student for the transition to interprofessional practice as a multi-skilled health professional. The unit will examine the management of self and others, organizational structures within healthcare practice, evaluation of leadership teamwork, risk management and multidisciplinary decision making. Students will participate in a range of learning experiences designed to enhance their appreciation of health professionals' roles and teamwork skills. Specific clinical contexts of learning will be acute care emergencies, mental health emergencies and disaster management.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to engage in multi-skilled interprofessional roles in multidisciplinary team environments
  2. Appraise the contribution of leadership, management, teamwork and interdisciplinary collaboration in the provision of quality emergency care
  3. Engage in appropriate interactions within the multidisciplinary health care team that promote and support patient participation and autonomy
  4. Analyse a range of problem solving and time management strategies that enhance the organization of clinical workload whilst engaged in interprofessional practice
  5. Incorporate and evaluate culturally relevant and age specific interventions for clients across the lifespan
  6. Apply the principles of adult learning to identify their specific learning needs
  7. Reflect critically on their own actions and on the nature of interprofessional practice in relation to the management of clients' health situations; practice with increasing independence at a beginning registered nurse level in accordance with the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMC) competencies.

Fieldwork

1. Four week nursing clinical placement in a hospital emergency department.

Assessment

Written assignment (60%) (Hurdle)
Reflective assignment (2,000 words) (40%)
Nursing clinical assessment (Pass / Fail)
Paramedic clinical skills logbook (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

Lectures and laboratory sessions throughout the semester. This unit involves two clinical placements:

  1. Four week nursing clinical placement in a hospital emergency department
  2. Approximately 120 hours paramedic clinical placements in a range of paramedic settings.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Lorraine Walker

Offered

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit continues to develop the student's ability to provide health care in community based emergency health and hospital settings. It builds on the model of clinical competence and the context of clinical practice commenced in previous years of this course. It provides context to support the clinical theory unit concurrently undertaken in this semester, BEH3032. Supervised clinical experience is undertaken in ambulance and community based health settings. Hospital experience involves critical care areas, operating theatre, and emergency department.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Reflect and critically review their own clinical experience and arrange suitable learning experiences in response to the varying clinical placement opportunities;
  2. Develop clinical, professional and leadership capabilities as a beginning health care provider by integrating reflection on placement experience with theoretical knowledge;
  3. Communicate effectively to other members of the health care team and contribute to team functioning through knowledge of group dynamics and professional roles;
  4. Apply a duty of care within the prevailing legal and ethical frameworks of community based emergency health and hospital settings;
  5. Explain and apply protocols for providing advanced life support under supervision;
  6. Demonstrate a culturally sensitive and patient-centred approach to the management of patients and family experiencing acute illness or injury.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: approximately 120 hours in a range of paramedic and hospital settings.

Assessment

Reflective practice assignment (55%) (Hurdle)
Inter-professional case reviews (45%)
Clinical practice portfolio (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

Lectures and laboratory sessions through the semester. Clinical Placement: approximately 120 hours in a range of paramedic and hospital settings.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3892 and BEH3032.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Katrina Recoche (Peninsula), Heather Buttigieg (Clayton)

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This introductory unit will introduce the student to the ANMC competency domain of collaborative and therapeutic practice. Content in this unit will compliment theory and skills taught in other units in semester one of the course. Students will be provided the opportunity to explore important professional aspects of being a nurse or midwife and the significance of fitness for practice. Students will:

  • describe the basic psychological process of human behaviour;
  • demonstrate effective communication with individuals and groups and other members of the healthcare team;
  • discuss how evidence is translated into clinical practice.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply, at a beginning level, critical thinking and reflection in the development of self as an independent learner and a future health professional.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of psychological processes related to development, conflict, stress and attitudes.
  3. Describe modes of therapeutic communication employed by healthcare professionals including key issues, barriers and strategies that must be considered in each focussed on person-centredness.
  4. Explain the modes of professional communication within professional relationships focussed on fitness for practice.
  5. Discuss the importance of evidence-based practice in the provision of safe, effective, holistic health care.
  6. Explore differing models for translation of evidence to practice.

Assessment

Online quiz (10%)
Tutorial participation (10%)
Writing task (35%)
Examination (45%)

Workload requirements

  • Lectures one hour per week
  • Tutorial one hour per week
  • Guided self-directed learning two (2) hour per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 3562 or 3892 or 4506 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Louisa Lam (Clayton), Mr James Bonnamy (Peninsula)

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the beginning knowledge and skills of the professional nurse. The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMC) competency standards for the registered nurse are utilised as a framework to guide students in relation to person-centred care, patient safety, cultural and contextual competence and developing practice.

This unit includes the theoretical and practical foundations of clinical practice and processes in the clinical environment. In this unit you learn how to individualise care and undertake basic clinical skills that are fundamental in the care of individuals and groups. It is here you begin to explore the art and science that underpins the practice of a professional registered nurse.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply the concepts of health using a person-centred approach.
  2. Acquire the knowledge and principles underpinning health assessment, including the collection and recording of data, within varied contexts of care.
  3. Develop an evidence-based approach to the performance of select care skills in simulated and clinical environments while demonstrating an ability to maintain patient safety.
  4. Identify and evaluate the health needs of individuals and populations.
  5. Identify and discuss the biomedical, psychological, cultural and social aspects of healthcare.
  6. Apply professional behaviours and communication guided by the ANMC competency standards for professional practice.

Assessment

Written examination (2,000 words) (2 hours) (45%) (Hurdle)
Clinical skills examination (1,000 words) (20%) (Hurdle)
Health assessment and documentation (2,000 words) (35%)
Mandatory requirements for clinical placement (1,000 words) (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

To pass this unit the student must pass the written examination, clinical skills examination and complete the mandatory requirements for clinical placement.

Workload requirements

1 x Two (2) hour lecture per week, 1 x Two (2) hour clinical learning environment per week, eight (8) hours per week student directed learning.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 2552 or 3562 or 3892 or 4514.

Prohibitions

NUR1101.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

TBA (Clayton), Mr Clifford Connell (Peninsula)

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit examines fundamental knowledge and skills in preparation for the care of individuals. Emphasis is placed on systematic health assessment and the development and evaluation of appropriate person-centred care, incorporating the legal and ethical dimensions of care. The clinical practise experience undertaken in this unit is an integral component of the development of the nurse/midwife and concentrates on the practical application of theoretical principles explored in this unit.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Accurately perform comprehensive health and physical assessment skills in simulated and clinical practice environments;
  2. Plan, implement and evaluate nursing care using a person-centred approach cognisant of each individual's autonomy, self - esteem and dignity;
  3. Demonstrate the ability to integrate scientific knowledge with nursing practice;
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the fundamental principles of medication management related to patient safety;
  5. Demonstrate professional and personal accountability as a novice practitioner when providing nursing care.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement two (2) weeks, (80 hours).

Assessment

Written assignment (2,000 words) (40%)
Examination (2 hours) (MCQ/EMQ/SAQ) (40%) (Hurdle)
Clinical skills examination (20%) (Hurdle)
Clinical placement (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)
Medication calculation and mastery test (30 minutes) (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Students must pass the clinical placement, clinical skills assessments, Medication calculation and mastery test and exam hurdle to pass this unit.

Workload requirements

Lectures:

  • two (2) hours per week

Laboratory:

  • two (2) hours per week

Guided self-directed learning:

  • one (1) hour per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUR1010 or NUR1101.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 2552 or 3562 or 3892 or 4506 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kay McCauley (Peninsula), Ms Cath Wilson (Clayton)

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Leadership is fundamental to the nature of nursing and midwifery; in the formation of safe practice, interdisciplinary relationships, education, research and health care delivery. In this unit, nursing leadership is explored by examining the historical nature of leadership in nursing/midwifery. The social construct of leadership will be investigated in the context of interpersonal organisational health care relationships and clinical practice. A major feature of the unit is an exploration of the professional values and ethics that form the basis of decision making in health care systems and nursing/midwifery practice.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the contexts in which health care is provided in Australia including primary care, acute care, sub acute care, maternity care and supportive care;
  2. Discuss the philosophical and ethical values that underpin nursing/midwifery as a profession, and health care;
  3. Describe the attributes and roles of leaders and leaders in nursing/midwifery;
  4. Conceptualise the relationship between nursing/midwifery, leadership and teamwork;
  5. Explain the principles underpinning standards and codes of practice related to the nursing and midwifery profession and the health professional - client relationship;
  6. Explore the application of ethical theories to issues in everyday life and health care;
  7. Discuss the role of community, culture and religion in influencing health care practice; and
  8. Debate the values underpinning difference pertaining to gender, cultural and disability.

Assessment

Tutorial attendance and participation (10%)
Student-led discussion (50%)
Final examination (2 hours) (40%)

Workload requirements

Lectures:

  • two (2) hours per week

Tutorials:

  • two (2) hours per fortnight

Guided self-directed learning:

  • one (1) hour per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nursing or Diploma of Tertiary Studies.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

TBA (Clayton), Ms Lorraine Walker (Peninsula)

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The aim of this unit is to introduce nursing and midwifery students to the legal system including the processes and institutions that impact on professional practice. Students will identify the law as it relates to the delivery of health services including professional standards and regulation, complaint mechanisms and relevant legal forums including the coroner's court. Students will be encouraged to explore the health professional's relationship and obligations owed to patients, patient families and professional colleagues in the various health care environments.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and relevance of common law and statute law pertinent to health professional practice;
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of the legal implications of actions taken in professional practice;
  3. Analyse the legal implications of the health care professional relationship with clients, their families and other health care providers;
  4. Identify strategies, which may provide assistance in resolving legal issues that arise in the various domains of the health professional;
  5. Discuss the legal obligations of registered nursing and midwifery practitioners in the health care environment; and
  6. Critically reflect on own values about health illness, dying and death affects professional responses and interactions with others.

Assessment

Online quiz (10%)
10 x Worksheets (10%)
Written assignment (1,500 words) (35%)
Exam (45%)

Workload requirements

Lectures/workshops two (2) hours per week, Tutorial one (1) hour per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Only available to students enrolled in: 0727 Bachelor of Nursing or 2552 Diploma of Tertiary Studies or 3892 Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or 3953 Bachelor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Midwifery or 3963 Bachelor of Nursing Practice or 4506 Bachelor of Nursing (Community Health) or 4514 Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Midwifery.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Mrs Patricia Schwerdtle (Peninsula), Dr Louisa Lam (Clayton)

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit aims to explore the connection between the science of public health and health outcomes of a diverse range of individuals and populations. Current research evidence incorporating epidemiology and the social determinants of health will be introduced. The unit will focus on vulnerable populations, infectious disease, population screening, health care systems, health promotion, global health and climate change, equipping students with cultural competence and rudimentary knowledge and skills in population health.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the impact of population health demographics on health outcomes, with a focus on vulnerable groups;
  2. Interpret the incidence, prevalence and clinical relevance of population health information presented in health research publications;
  3. Describe the social determinants of health and discuss their impact on the health of diverse population groups and their utilisation of clinical services;
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of cultural sensitivity, cultural safety and cultural competence as explained in the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) guidelines; and
  5. Apply the principles of 'person-centeredness', leadership and cultural competence to achieve optimal health outcomes across a range of population groups and diverse clinical settings.

Assessment

Group presentation (20 minutes) and written synopsis (2,000 words) (30%)
Online quiz (20 minutes) (10%)
Written examination (2 hours) (60%)

Workload requirements

Lectures:

  • two (2) hours per week

Tutorials:

  • one (1) hour per week

Guided learning activities:

  • two (2) hours per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 3892 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kay McCaulyand Ms Heather Buttigieg (Clayton)

Offered

Berwick

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Synopsis

This elective unit provides students with an introduction to maternity and paediatric nursing. Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of the nurse in supporting care of women and their families throughout the childbearing process. Emphasis is on normal pregnancy and postpartum care of mother and baby. The unit also extends learning from core units around medical and surgical care and special needs of children.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss roles and responsibilities of health professionals in the care of childbearing women, children and adolescents;
  2. Discuss physical, psychological changes and common complications in pregnancy;
  3. Outline key aspects of prenatal care;
  4. Describe the stages of labour;
  5. Describe assessments and care of mother and baby following birth;
  6. Identify common complications and their immediate management in the postpartum period;
  7. Describe characteristics and care of the normal newborn baby;
  8. Discuss common neonatal, paediatric and adolescent conditions and their management;
  9. Outline key periods in child and adolescent development;
  10. Describe common responses of children and adolescents to illness;
  11. Discuss the importance of family-centre care;
  12. Describe safe care of postnatal mothers, newborn babies, sick children and adolescents; and
  13. Discuss legal and ethical issues impacting on the care of childbearing women and hospitalized children and adolescents.

Assessment

Two (2) x workbooks (2,000 words each) (20% each)
Examination (2 hours) (60%)

Students must pass the examination to pass the unit.

Workload requirements

Four (4) hours lecture/tutorial/laboratory.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Only available to students enrolled in: Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Nursing and Bachelor of Emergency Health (Paramedic) or Bachelor of Nursing Practice.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Katrina Recoche

Offered

Berwick

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Synopsis

An important component of our health system is the services provided for those living with terminal illness. The health needs of these individuals are diverse and often change over time. An interdisciplinary approach will be used to engage students in building fundamental knowledge and skill for the provision of palliative care in any setting. This unit aims to develop the abilities of health professionals and other graduates to care for persons with life limiting illness, by improving awareness of the principles and values underpinning palliative care, communication, clinical assessment and interventions and optimizing function in palliative care and coping with dying and bereavement. This unit is a prerequisite for NUR3007 'Clinical experience in the palliative approach'.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively in the context of individual responses to loss and grief, existential challenges, uncertainty and changing goals of care;
  2. Appreciate and respect to the diverse human and clinical responses of each individual throughout their illness trajectory;
  3. Understand the principles of assessment and management of clinical and supportive care needs; and
  4. Reflect and evaluate their own professional and personal experiences and their cumulative impact on self and others.

Assessment

Comprehensive case study (40%)
Essay (40%)
Tutorial participation (20%)

Workload requirements

Three 2 hour workshops in weeks 1, 2 and 3 of the semester, weekly 1 hour podcast lectures or online forums in weeks 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Enrolment in 2nd or 3rd year of an undergraduate degree related to health sciences.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Janet Delange (Berwick), Ms Robyn Fairhall (Peninsula), Ms Loretta Garvey (Clayton)

Offered

Berwick

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces concepts of medical and surgical nursing and pharmacology, across the lifespan. A case based approach is used to facilitate the integration and application of pharmacological principles and associated drug groups underpinned by human pathophysiology related to the body system under review. Systems studied include respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, renal and endocrine. The topics of pain management, wound assessment and clinical assessment skills introduced in year one will be further developed as each system is studied. Clinical simulation exercises will be utilised in laboratory sessions to develop and enhance the acquisition of clinical skills. The clinical practicum component provides opportunities to develop competency to a year two (2) level in a range of skills learnt in the simulated laboratory environment

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate knowledge of pathophysiological changes associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, renal and endocrine dysfunction, and their application to the nursing care of patients in practice settings;
  2. describe the underpinning principles of pharmacology, therapeutic drug administration and monitoring as they relate to the patient;
  3. list / describe possible implications associated with drug administration, including drug interactions and side effects in the use of drugs across the life-span;
  4. describe the legal and professional nursing requirements associated with the safe use of medications, including administration, storage and handling;
  5. assess, plan, implement and evaluate culturally relevant and age specific nursing interventions for patients requiring medical and/or surgical care;
  6. identify ethical issues relevant to the nursing care of patients requiring medical and/or surgical care;
  7. demonstrate safe clinical practice in an acute and/or primary care setting based on the integration of theoretical principles and practical skills;
  8. provide person-centred care according to relevant nursing care principles for patients, under the direct supervision of registered nursing staff and the clinical teacher; and
  9. reflect and evaluate self-performance related to knowledge, skills and nursing care delivered.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: Four (4) weeks (160 hours).

Assessment

Oral group assignment case study (30%)
Examination (2 hours) (40%) (Hurdle)
Two online quizzes (MCQ)(20 minutes per quiz)(10%)
Clinical placement (5%) (Hurdle)
Clinical skills competencies (15%) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

Weekly schedule (8 week teaching semester on campus)

Online learning:

  • 3-3.5 hours per week

Masterclass/lecture:

  • one (1) hour per week

Workshop:

  • three (3) hours per week

Clinical learning environment:

  • two (2) hours

Clinical placement four (4) weeks off campus (160 hours).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 4514.

Prohibitions

NUR2002.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Karen Harder (Peninsula & Berwick), Mr Eddie Robinson (Clayton)

Offered

Berwick

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides the opportunity for the student to develop fundamental knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to the restoration and maintenance of optimal mental health. Students will be expected to assess people with mental health problems and to identify, prioritise and implement appropriate evidence based interventions and management strategies.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. discuss concepts of mental health and mental illness
  2. describe services available for consumers with mental illness
  3. identify the impact of stigma on consumers and their carers
  4. identify and respond to consumer specific issues such as culture, age and gender to optimise therapeutic communication
  5. describe and discuss Mental Status Examination (MSE) and risk assessments conducted with clients who are experiencing disturbances in thought, mood, behaviour and perception
  6. discuss the utilisation of the legal and ethical issues related to the care of clients when admitted under the Victorian Mental Health Act (2014)
  7. describe the aetiological factors, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of a range of disorders including affective disorders, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, psychosis, child and adolescent issues and cognititive issues in the elderly client
  8. describe a range of therapeutic modalities utilised in the care and treatment of people with mental health issues and disorders.

Assessment

Essay (2,000 words) (30%)
5 x Online quizzes (10%)
Examination (2 hours) (60%) (Hurdle x 1 attempt permitted)
80% Attendance at tutorials (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

Lectures:

  • two hours per week

Tutorials:

  • two hours per week (with a minimum of 80% attendance requirement)

Guided learning activities:

  • one hour per week

Online quizzes:

  • one hour per week

Self-directed learning:

  • six hours per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Patricia Schwerdtle

Offered

Berwick

  • First semester 2016 (Flexible)

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Flexible)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Flexible)

Synopsis

This unit introduces nursing students and other professionals to the key principles, philosophies and frameworks that guide health promotion practice in Australia and internationally. Students will examine concepts and theories of health promotion and the primary health care sector, including medical, behavioural and socio-environmental approaches to health care. Health promotion is underpinned by a philosophy of health for all; therefore concepts such as partnership development, community participation, health equity, social justice, capacity building and advocacy are described to empower nurses and other professionals with the means to plan, implement and evaluate health promotion practice across all sectors of the Australian health care system. By the end of this unit, students will have examined and described these key concepts of health promotion in relation to the Australian context.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss and critically reflect on key principles, philosophies and frameworks that underpin health promotion practice and activity;
  2. Compare and contrast primary care, primary health care, medical, behavioural, and socio-environmental approaches to health promotion and discuss their strengths and limitations;
  3. Analyse the concepts of partnership development, community participation, health equity and inequity, social justice, capacity building and advocacy in relation to the nurses' role in empowering and enabling individuals, families and communities;
  4. Recognise the importance of effective communication strategies to include examining health literacy in the context of health promotion;
  5. Outline the different types of evidence that guides health care and sources of evidence that can assist nurses in planning health promotion;
  6. Critically reflect on the importance of appropriate planning, implementation and evaluation to ensure sustainability when engaging in health promotion activity;
  7. Recognise the contribution of health policy development to health promotion and the role of nursing in ongoing developments in health policy;
  8. Discuss ethical challenges that are presented by health promotion.

Assessment

Health promotion program plan synopsis (1000 words) and group presentation (10 minutes) (40%)
Workbook and Tutorial participation (20%)
Examination (MCQ/SAQ/EMQ) (2 hours) (40%)

Workload requirements

This is a flexible unit with compulsory on campus tutorial sessions.
Two x 8 hour workshops (Podcast): 16 hours
Online guided learning activities: 20 hours
Self-directed learning: 120 hours

Total: 156 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prohibitions

HSC1072.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

TBA

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit introduces the concept of working with families from a strengths-based framework. The concept of family strengths has been studied for several decades and describes a family that functions optimally in support of the individual members. When nurses and other professionals use a family strengths theoretical framework in their daily practice, they contribute to providing health care that focuses on the whole rather than only the individual and begin to support families when accessing health care. A healthy family may be stronger in one area than another, and strengths may overlap with each other. It is well known that the family environment may have a positive or a negative effect on individuals in the family, depending on the family's values, beliefs, and ability to manage change. The composition and structure of contemporary families are wide-ranging, and include families from varying cultures, with composition including single and extended families, and families at differing socioeconomic levels. This unit aims to bridge the gap in theoretical content related to family care across the lifespan so that nurses and other professionals can explore the factors that shape their capacity to develop caring relationships with individuals, families, groups, populations, and communities.

Outcomes

Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast strengths, supports, protective factors and vulnerabilities within differing families
  2. Discuss the impact of contemporary issues on the health and wellbeing of the family in the context of multicultural families and communities living in Australia
  3. Explore how a strengths-based approach to working with families is developed and defined within the nursing context and the broader health care system
  4. Critically appraise the concept of building trusting relationship with individuals, families and communities to facilitate health and wellbeing
  5. Describe the nurses' and other professionals role and responsibilities when working with at risk families
  6. Discuss the role of the health professional in promoting health and wellbeing within families across the life span.

Assessment

Simulation based learning (1,000 words) (30%)
Written assignment (3,000 words) (40%)
Group assignment (3,000 words) (30%)

Workload requirements

This is a flexible unit with compulsory on campus simulation based tutorial sessions. Two hour lecture per week (Podcast): 24 hours, One hour tutorial / simulation based learning activities per week: 12 hours, Self-directed learning: 120 hours.

Total: 156 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

TBA

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Janet Delange (Berwick), TBA (Peninsula), Ms Loretta Garvey (Clayton)

Offered

Berwick

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Using a lifespan approach this unit builds on semester one learning in NUR2106 and further explores the integration and application of pharmacological principles and associated drug groups underpinned by human pathophysiology related to the body system under review.

There will be an emphasis on the general paediatric population and commonly presenting conditions that relate specifically to this group. Other systems that will be studied include musculoskeletal, gastroenterological, haematological and vascular conditions. Clinical simulation exercises will be utilised in laboratory sessions to develop and enhance the acquisition of clinical skills. The clinical practicum component provides opportunities to develop competency to a second year level in a range of skills learnt in the simulated laboratory environment.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate knowledge of pathophysiological changes associated with gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, vascular and hematological dysfunction and their application to the nursing care of patients in medical/surgical contexts;
  2. recognise paediatric health issues relating to the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems, incorporating specific health assessment techniques;
  3. describe underpinning principles of pharmacology, therapeutic drug administration and monitoring as they relate to the patient;
  4. discuss possible implications associated with drug administration, including calculations for administering drugs to paediatric patients;
  5. describe the legal and professional nursing requirements associated with safe use of medications including administration, storage and handling;
  6. analyse problems associated with drug administration, including drug interactions and the use of drugs across the life-span;
  7. plan culturally relevant and age specific nursing interventions for acutely ill patients across the lifespan;
  8. critically discuss ethical issues relevant to the nursing care of patients requiring medical/surgical care;
  9. demonstrate safe, evidenced based clinical practice in an acute care setting based on integration of theoretical principles and practical skills;
  10. provide person-centred care according to relevant nursing care principles for patients, under the supervision of registered nursing staff and the clinical teacher;
  11. conduct and document comprehensive assessments of patient needs utilising an appropriate assessment tool; and
  12. reflect and evaluate self-performance in terms of the delivery of quality nursing care.

Fieldwork

Two (2) weeks of clinical placement at five (5) days/week (based on an 8 hour day/40 hour week, 80 hours in total).

Assessment

4 x Quizzes (10 questions each) (10%)
Written assignment - paired clinical case study assignment (3,000 words) (30%)
Peerwise - online creation and critique of evidence based multiple choice questions (15%)
End of semester exam (2 hours) (45%)
Clinical practice assessment (Pass / Fail)
Students must achieve a pass in the clinical placement to pass the unit (100%). Attendance at clinical is mandatory.
Drug Calculations Exam (Hurdle) (100% mastery)
Laboratory attendance (Hurdle) (100% attendance)

Workload requirements

Module 1: Online learning (4 hours), Master class/intro (1 hour), Workshop (4 hours), Clinical laboratory (2 hours online) = Total: 11 hours.
Module 2: Online learning (5 hours), Master class (1 hour), Workshop (5 hours), Clinical laboratory (2 hours) = Total: 13 hours.
Module 3: Online learning (5 hours), Master class (1 hour), Workshop (5 hours), Clinical laboratory (2 hours), Medication hurdle (1 hour) = Total: 14 hours.
Module 4: Online learning (4 hours), Master class (1 hour), Workshop (3 hours), Clinical laboratory (2 hours) = Total: 10 hours.

Two (2) weeks of clinical placement at five (5) days/week (based on an 8 hour day/40 hour week, 80 hours in total).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 4514.

Prohibitions

NUR2004.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Mr Charanjit Singh (Peninsula & Berwick), Mr Eddie Robinson (Clayton)

Offered

Berwick

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This Mental Health Nursing unit draws upon student's prior theoretical knowledge, skills and attitudes from NUR2107. This unit will focus upon professional issues including self care, clinical supervision; utilising evidence based nursing interventions and preparation for clinical practice. This unit has a 4 week clinical component, where students will apply evidence based nursing care and interventions with mentally ill consumers and their carers.

Theoretical principles and standards of practice are derived from the ANMC National Competency Standards for the Registered Nurse, the ACMHN Standards of Practice for Australian Mental Health Nurses, current evidenced based care and associated legislation.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. identify the importance of emotional self care and reflective practice;
  2. utilize therapeutic approaches when collaborating with carers and clients;
  3. utilize knowledge of clinical manifestations and associated treatments with clients and carers to provide coordinated and effective care;
  4. identify and respond to the client's cultural and gender specific issues that affect the provision of safe mental health nursing care;
  5. conduct and document Mental Status Examinations (MSE) and risk assessments of clients who have disturbances in mood, thought, behavior and perception;
  6. demonstrate and apply knowledge of the Victorian Mental Health Act (1986) as amended;
  7. demonstrate professional behaviours, accountability, ethical decision making and satisfactory knowledge base for safe and coordinated practice in the mental health setting;
  8. recognize the importance of research in the role of the multidisciplinary team in the interdependent delivery of care; and
  9. practice in accordance with the ANMC Competency Standards for the Registered Nurse.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: Four (4) weeks (160 hours).

Assessment

Essay (2,000 words) (35%)
One online MH nursing quiz (10%) (Complete prior to clinical)
Examination (2 hours) (55%) (Hurdle)
Clinical practice (Pass / Fail) (Satisfactory completion of clinical practice is required to pass this unit)

Workload requirements

Tutorials 2 hours per week x 6 weeks, Guided work (Case based studies) 1 hour per week x 6 weeks, Online quiz 1 hour, Self directed readings 1 hour per week x 6 weeks, Clinical placement (Mental health) x 4 weeks (160 hours).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

TBA

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

The aim of this unit is to provide registered nurses with a comprehensive foundation for the assessment of clients' health status in order to determine and deliver competent nursing care based upon the goals of health restoration, maintenance and promotion.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. analyse health assessment data using a problem solving approach in order to develop an appropriate plan for client care;
  2. relate the concept of holistic health to nursing health assessment and nursing practice;
  3. identify communication skills that will enhance the nurse/client therapeutic relationship;
  4. discuss the importance of using a practical framework for delivering appropriate client care;
  5. completely assess and record a client's health history; and
  6. perform and document a systematic physical assessment.

Assessment

Assignment 1 (25%)
Assignment 2 (25%)
Exam (50%)

Workload requirements

  • One (1) hour of lecture per week
  • Two (2) hours of tutorial per week
  • Two (2) - four (4) hours private study per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

TBA

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 0727.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Lorraine Walker

Offered

Berwick

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The aim of this unit is to develop in students an understanding of the basic principles of pain and wound care management as they relate to nursing, as responsible and appropriate nursing intervention is frequently a determinant of the overall success of therapy. The need for the nurse to develop a broad knowledge base of wound and pain management and therapeutic regimes is considered an essential element of professional clinical practice.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. explore the physiological aspects that influence wound healing;
  2. demonstrate the ability to undertake a comprehensive wound assessment, and to discuss wound characteristics and their relationship to type of dressing product selected;
  3. identify the principles of infection control relating to wound care;
  4. discuss the impact of appropriate wound assessment and provision of comprehensive wound management in the health care setting;
  5. examine the physiological and psychological effects of chronic and acute pain;
  6. analyse and develop a framework for the assessment of pain, disability and physical function, including the use of appropriate tools;
  7. identify current therapeutic and complementary measures to manage pain in the health care setting; and
  8. discuss social and cultural influences on pain and disability and he educational needs of clients in relation to the provision of evidence-based pain management.

Assessment

Module one: Case study (25%)
Module two: Case study (25%)
Examination (50%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 0727.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Jill Stow (Peninsula & Berwick), Associate Professor Jenny Newton (Clayton)

Offered

Berwick

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit introduces the student to the concept of evidence based practice and its application to health care. The evidence based practice model will be presented as the framework to encourage students to reflect on the current evidence base of contemporary clinical practices. The unit will introduce the student to the principles underpinning qualitative and quantitative research approaches, the research process and methodology and the ethical issues of undertaking research. Students will explore the different levels of evidence through reviewing research reports on topical issues of practice within healthcare delivery.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. discuss the concept of evidence based practice and its application to clinical practice;
  2. discuss the different forms of knowledge acquisition in nursing and midwifery;
  3. describe the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research;
  4. demonstrate a knowledge of the key aspects within the research process;
  5. discuss the ethical principles underpinning research process; and
  6. assess the quality of evidence derived from nursing and midwifery research literature.

Assessment

Assignment (2500 words) (45%)
Online Quiz (30 minutes)(10%)
Examination (EMQ/SAQ)(2 hours)(45%)

Workload requirements

This unit will consist of:
Two (2) hours lectures per week, supplemented by a minimum of four (4) online podcasts for the remaining weeks of the semester, Two (2) hours tutorials per week.
NB: Tutorials are compulsory for students not attending clinical placement; students required to attend clinical placement must attend a minimum seven (7) tutorials per semester.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 4514.

Prohibitions

BEH2021.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Katie Piper ( Peninsula), Ms Noelleen Kiprillis (Berwick), Mr John Thompson (Clayton)

Offered

Berwick

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This clinical practice unit provides an introduction to the management of clients with complex and or life threatening health problems across the lifespan with a particular focus on the acute care needs of the ageing individual. A case based approach will be utilized to facilitate the integration of advance health assessment skills, evidenced based practice and application of ethical principles in the management of complex nursing situations.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate in-depth knowledge of a range of complex health problems experienced by clients throughout the lifespan;
  2. describe the nursing application of diagnostic, therapeutic and preventative techniques associated with caring for a person with a complex body system health breakdown;
  3. employ clinical and critical decision making skills to identify, analyse and resolve problems in the practice environment;
  4. demonstrate the ability to apply time management and problem solving skills in the safe delivery of patient care;
  5. evaluate the clinical application of evidence based research and the ethical principles in the safe management of complex health care issues;
  6. develop and implement patient centred care interventions that encompass patient's complex health, cultural, ethical and developmental needs;
  7. reflect critically on the role of the multidisciplinary team in provision of safe patient care;
  8. practice with increasing independence in accordance with the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council Competencies for Registered nurse, code of ethics and code of professional conduct for nurses.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: Two (2) weeks (80 hours).

Assessment

Case study / written assignment (2,500 words) (40%)
Examination (2 hours) (60%) (Hurdle)

Hurdle:
Students must pass the clinical placement to pass this unit.
Students must achieve a pass in the final examination to achieve a pass in this unit.
Students must attend 90% of all scheduled laboratories, unless a medical certificate is provided - refer to school's clinical policy for details.

Workload requirements

  • Two (2) hours of lectures per week
  • Two (2) hours laboratory practice per week
  • Guided work one (1) hour per week
  • Two (2) weeks of clinical placement at five (5) days/week (based on an 8 hour day/40 hour week, 80 hours in total).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUR2002 or NUR2106, NUR2004 or NUR2206, NUR2104 or NUR2207.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 3892 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Georgina Willetts (Clayton), Mr Mark Browning (Berwick), Mr Cliff Connell (Peninsula)

Offered

Berwick

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Education is a key part of the work of health care professionals through provision of patient, peer and student teaching. Understanding teaching and learning theories and approaches is fundamental to delivering effective teaching. This unit aims to introduce students to teaching and learning for clinical practice. It will explore theory underpinning teaching and learning as well as provide opportunities for skills development in planning and delivering teaching.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. discuss contexts where education is provided in clinical practice;
  2. critique educational theory and its relationship to teaching and learning practices;
  3. outline factors that impact on effective teaching and learning;
  4. describe approaches for planning, evaluating and assessing teaching and learning;
  5. evaluate the role of education in health promotion;
  6. participate in a 3 hour IPL delirium workshop;
  7. conduct effective basic peer teaching sessions; and
  8. reflect upon their own perspectives on teaching and learning.

Assessment

Peer teaching preparation and lesson plan (2,500 words)(45%)
Essay (2,500 words) (45%)
Teaching practical - reflective lesson plan annotation (1000 words) (10%)

Hurdle:
Peer teaching practical
IPL Delirium workshop
You are required to attend 80% of all scheduled unit tutorials, unless documentary evidence (such as a medical certificate, relevant death notice, etc.) is provided.

Workload requirements

  • Two (2) hours of lecture per week
  • One (1) hour of tutorial per week
  • Two (2) - four (4) hours private study per week
  • Plus hurdle requirements.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUR1101 or NUR1010; and NUR1203 or NUR1102.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Kelli Innes (Peninsula), Ms Noelleen Kiprills (Berwick), (Clayton TBA)

Offered

Berwick

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This clinical unit focuses on the preparation of the student for the transition to practice as a professional nurse. The emphasis of the unit will be grounded in the philosophy of adult learning encouraging the student to be self-directed in the identification of their learning needs. In preparing for practice the unit will examine the management of self and others, organizational structures within healthcare practice, evaluation of leadership, teamwork, risk management and multidisciplinary decision making.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. apply the principles of adult learning to identify their specific learning needs;
  2. evaluate the contribution of leadership, management, teamwork and interdisciplinary collaboration in the provision of quality nursing care;
  3. analyse a range of problem solving and time management strategies that enhance the organization of clinical workload;
  4. incorporate, and evaluate culturally and ethically relevant and age specific nursing interventions for clients across the lifespan;
  5. reflect critically, on their own actions, professional role development and on the nature of nursing practice in relation to the management of clients' health situations;
  6. demonstrate the ability to apply time management and problem solving skills in the delivery of client care; and
  7. practice with increasing independence at a beginning registered nurse level in accordance with the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMAC) competencies.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: Four (4) weeks (160 hours).

Assessment

Learning project (2,500 words) (45%)
Written assignment (2,500 words) (45%)
Clinical Placement performance assessment (10%)
Clinical placement summative assessment (Pass / Fail) (Hurdle)

Hurdle:
Students must achieve a pass in the clinical placement to pass the unit.
Students must attend 90% of all scheduled tutorials - refer to school clinical guidelines for details.

Workload requirements

Two (2) hours of lecture per week, Two (2) hours of tutorial fortnightly, Two (2) - four (4) hours private study per week, Four (4) weeks of clinical placement at five (5) days/week (based on an 8 hour day/40 hour week, 160 hours in total).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUR2002 or NUR2106, NUR2004 or NUR2206, NUR2104 or NUR2107, NUR3002.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

TBA

Offered

Berwick

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit focuses on multi-disciplinary care and models of care delivery with an emphasis on ageing, chronic and life limiting illness. With the evolving role of the nurse as primary care providers it introduces the student to the issues facing older people and will include healthy ageing, the ageing process, polypharmacy, lifestyle issues, advanced health assessment related to people with complex health needs and legal and ethical issues associated with aging, chronic illness and palliative care.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. discuss perspectives, and the physical, psychological and social aspects of ageing in the context of health and illness in older people in our community
  2. describe the impact of ageing and chronic illness on clients, families and carers and apply this to discharge planning bridging the transition from acute care to primary care and palliative care
  3. analyse the legal and ethical issues that arise from changes to cognition, chronic and life limiting illness such as challenges to autonomy, protection of patients, quality of life and euthanasia
  4. differentiate the roles of nurses working in multidisciplinary teams, who care for people with chronic and/or life limiting illness in different health care environments
  5. utilise holistic health assessment skills to assess the complex health needs of older adults and people with chronic and life limiting illness in relation to physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs
  6. demonstrate and evaluate a range of evidenced based interventions that support the person experiencing complex care needs associated with living with a chronic illness
  7. identify the primary care resources for people with issues related to ageing, chronic and life limiting illness in the community
  8. utilise health promotion, supportive and palliative approaches to care for people with chronic and life limiting illness in a range of health care settings.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: Two (2) weeks (80 hours).

Assessment

Examination (3 hour) (50%)
Assignment (40%)
Online guided activity (10%)
Clinical placement assessment (100% attendance) (Pass / Fail)

Hurdle:
Students must achieve a pass in the clinical placement to pass the unit.
Students must attend 90% of all scheduled laboratories - refer to school clinical guidelines for details.
Students are required to attend 80% of clinical workshops/tutorials, unless they are able to provide medical or other certification.

Workload requirements

Two (2) hours of lecture per week, Two (2) hours of tutorial, Four (4) hours guided study per week, Two (2) weeks of clinical placement at five (5) days/week (based on an 8 hour day/40 hour week, 80 hours in total).

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUR2002 or NUR2106, NUR2004 or NUR2206, NUR2104 or NUR2107.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 0727 or 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Ruth DeSouzaand Ms Suzanne Willey (Peninsula)

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit provides students with resources to understand their own culture, the culture of healthcare and the historical and social issues that contribute to differential health outcomes for particular groups in order to discern how to contribute to providing culturally safe care for all Australians. Australian society has an indigenous foundation and is becoming increasingly multicultural. In Victoria 26.2 percent of Victorians and 24.6 per cent of Australians were born overseas, compared with New Zealand (22.4 per cent), Canada (21.3 per cent), United States (13.5 per cent) and The United Kingdom (10.4 per cent). An important aspect of cultural safety is the recognition that the health care system has its own culture. In Australia, this culture is premised on a western scientific worldview. The unit will examine how social determinants of health such as class, gender, race, sexual orientation, gender identity; education, economic status and culture affect health and illness. The influence of politics, economics, social-cultural environment and other contextual factors will be discussed, with an emphasis on how policy, planning, organisation and delivery of health and healthcare have an impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Critically evaluate the dominant values and beliefs that shape the organisation of health care in Australia.
  2. Discuss historical and contemporary influences on the health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  3. Discuss historical and contemporary influences on the health outcomes for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse peoples in Australia.
  4. Critically reflect on how their own cultural identity can impact on the care they provide to individuals and communities with different understandings of health from their own.
  5. Demonstrate effective communication skills and attitudes required of nurses in providing culturally safe care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse people.
  6. Apply the principles of cultural safety to nursing care.

Assessment

Group poster presentation (1,000 words) (20%)
Critical reflection (1,500 words) (30%)
Written assignment (3,000 words) (50%)

Workload requirements

This is a flexible unit with compulsory on campus workshops. Two (2) hours of lecture per week (Podcast): 24 hours. Two (8) hour workshops (one for poster presentations, one for mask making):16 hours. Self-directed learning: 116 hours.

Total workload: 156 hours

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

HSC1081, HSC1072 or NUR1105, NUR1205.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Joanne Porter

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit addresses issues associated with transition to rural nursing practice and prepares students for the expanded generalist role that characterises rural nursing practice. Concerned with preparing students for a satisfying and sustainable rural nursing career, the unit requires students to explore opportunities for continuing education, professional affiliation and engagement and career advancement.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

Educational Objectives:

  1. develop a career path plan;
  2. evaluate the contribution of leadership, management, teamwork and interdisciplinary collaboration in facilitating case management and optimal health outcomes;
  3. evaluate a range of strategies to effectively manage challenging and critical incidents commonly associated with the Division 1RN role;
  4. critically analyse the importance of professional affiliation and life-long learning in advancing health outcomes;
  5. apply the principles of adult learning to identify your specific learning needs;
  6. reflect critically on your own actions, professional role development and on the nature of nursing practice;

Clinical Objectives:

  1. apply problem solving and time management strategies to effectively organize clinical workloads;
  2. manage clinical problems appropriately;
  3. practise with increasing independence demonstrating AN&MC competencies;
  4. demonstrate safe evidence-based practice in the clinical setting.

Assessment

Assignment (3,000 words) (50%)
Clinical learning contract (20%)
Clinical report (reflective) (30%)

Workload requirements

3 hour lecture per week, 2 hour tutorial per week, 2 hours on-line activities per week for 4 weeks. A total of 124 hours of Student directed learning.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Katie Piper (Peninsula), Ms Noelleen Kiprillis (Berwick), Mr John Thompson (Clayton)

Offered

Berwick

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This clinical practice unit introduces students to the nursing management of patients with complex and/or life threatening problems across the lifespan.

A case based approach will support the integration of advanced health assessment skills, evidence based practice and application of ethical principles in the management of complex nursing situations. This unit will focus on the translation of knowledge involving the management of the deteriorating patient.

Pathophysiology, pharmacology and evidence based healthcare will be critically examined concurrently as each complex health care situation is examined.

This approach will complement the clinical experience that students will undertake during the unit. In simulated and actual clinical settings, students will apply diagnostic, therapeutic and preventative techniques associated with caring for a person with a complex body system health breakdown in a range of settings.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge and concepts of biological, pathophysiological, psychological and social sciences to patients with complex and/or life threatening illness throughout the life span.
  2. Acquire in-depth knowledge on complex health problems experienced by patients throughout the lifespan in a range of settings.
  3. Identify and implement response systems for the deteriorating patient in the clinical setting.
  4. Explain appropriate therapeutic medications in the context of drug actions, indications, dosage, interactions and reactions in the patient with complex and/or life threatening illness.
  5. Identify, analyse and resolve clinical concerns in the patient with complex and/or life threatening illness.
  6. Develop and implement patient centred care appropriate to the needs and wishes of the patient and their family/carer, regardless of race, age, gender, sexual preference, physical or mental state or other diverse needs.
  7. Critically reflect on the values, attitudes and communication required by nurses when caring for patients and families/carers with diverse needs; complex and/or life threatening illness or the deteriorating patient.
  8. Undertake complex nursing activities in a range of health settings and apply appropriate principles of prioritising and time management according to the clinical setting.
  9. Critically reflect on decisions and judgements made to demonstrate accountability for evidence informed patient care.
  10. Practice with increasing independence in accordance with the Australian and Midwifery Council National competency standards for the registered nurse, Codes of ethics and Code of professional conduct for nurses.

Fieldwork

Clinical placement: 2 weeks (80 hours).

Assessment

Written assignment: Clinical case study (3,000 words) (30%)
Evidence based critique (2,000 words) (20%)
Online simulated scenario (Complete 2 scenarios) (10%)
Examination (2 hours) (40%) (Hurdle)
Clinical placement (2 weeks = 80 hours) (Hurdle)

Hurdle:
Students must pass the clinical placement to pass this unit.
Students must achieve a pass in the final examination to achieve a pass in this unit.
Students must attend 90% of all scheduled laboratories, unless a medical certificate is provided - refer to school's clinical policy for details.

Workload requirements

Lecture: 2 hours per week (20 hours),
Clinical Learning Environment: 2 hours per week (22 hours),
Tutorials: 1 hour per week (10 hours),
Online activities: 2 hours per week (20 hours),
Clinical placement: 2 weeks (80 hours),
Student directed learning: 16 hours per week. 160 hours.
Total: 312 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 0727 or 4506.

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Karen Missen

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit will incorporate an introduction to high acuity nursing of severely ill patients. Using a systematic approach to patient assessment, students will develop skills in caring for patients with, altered circulation, multi-organ failure, shock states and trauma. The focus will be on high acuity care and include other specialist areas of nursing practice such as critical care, perioperative, coronary care, acute medical surgical, emergency nursing and paediatric nursing with an emphasis of caring for patients across the lifespan.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

Educational Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of a range of complex health problems experienced by clients throughout the lifespan;
  2. Explore and evaluate the clinical application of nursing research and theoretical literature to acute and high acuity care;
  3. Incorporate culturally relevant, age specific, nursing therapeutics to address problems experienced by seriously ill clients;
  4. Review an appropriate disaster management plan, building upon existing knowledge of disaster management;
  5. Apply a systematic approach to patient assessment and implementation of management strategies in team-based simulation environment;

Clinical Objectives:

  1. Apply pathophysiological principles to the care of clients with serious and life threatening illness;
  2. Apply clinical reasoning to selected pathophysiological and psychosocial nursing phenomena;
  3. Demonstrate safe clinical practice based on current theoretical and pharmacological knowledge.

Assessment

Essay exploring the management of a high acuity patient (3,000 words) (30%)
Written examination (3 hours) (60%)
Online activities (10%)
Clinical assessment (Pass / Fail)

Hurdle:
Students must attend 100% of all scheduled laboratories, unless a medical certificate is provided - refer to school clinical guidelines for details.
Students must obtain a pass grade in the examination in order to obtain an overall pass grade for this unit.

Workload requirements

7 hours a week (lectures, tutorials, labs) plus 160 hours clinical. Guided Learning: One (1) hour per week for self directed reading.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUR2002, NUR2004, NUR2104.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 4514.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Ms Catherine Wilkin

Offered

Not offered in 2016

Synopsis

This unit focuses on an integrated structure for health and wellbeing in the community using the continuum from birth to end of life. This unit will provide opportunities for students to develop fundamental knowledge, incorporate primary health care theories and concepts. This process will expand their burgeoning skills and attitudes relevant to the prevention, restoration and maintenance of optimal health and wellbeing, specific to a range of community settings. Students will be supported to explore and develop knowledge significant to the family and health care needs so the individual and/or family become central to their management of optimal health. The clinical practice component will provide students with opportunities to incorporate theoretical learning into care and begin the transition to graduate practice.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. analyse the concepts of primary health care and population health;
  2. demonstrate knowledge of contemporary rural and remote community needs;
  3. assess factors that predispose, enable, or reinforce behaviours contributing to health risks;
  4. describe the roles and functions of the members of the multidisciplinary primary health care team;
  5. analyse ethical issues which pertain to primary health care;
  6. apply a range of therapeutic interventions to meet the physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs of patients/clients in the community;
  7. communicate effectively with people who are experiencing complex health issues;
  8. demonstrate cultural sensitivity and deep respectful listening to all rural and remote community members;
  9. provide evidence based interventions and resources that support the person and their family experiencing complex care needs;
  10. practice in accordance with ANMC Competencies for the Registered Nurse and other professional standards.

Assessment

Critique of a journal article (2,000 words) (20%)
Literature review (2,000 words) (30%)
Written assignment: Journal article format (3,000 - 4,000 words) (50%)
Clinical practice assessment (Pass / Fail)

Workload requirements

Lectures: 4 hours x 4 weeks = 16 hours; Tutorials: 2 hours x 4 weeks = 8 hours;
Clinical: 160 hours; Individual Study: 128 hours.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUR2002, NUR2004.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Julia Morphet

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides students with the opportunity to encounter a challenging research environment through the interaction of philosophical paradigms and extension of theoretical knowledge and acquisitions of skills to facilitate the undertaking of a research project. The unit will build upon knowledge gained in core undergraduate research units. Students will be allocated a research supervisor to begin formulating research questions and methodology for subsequent study.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. evaluate and utilise appropriate philosophical foundations of research;
  2. distinguish and critique quantitative and qualitative methodologies;
  3. develop and utilise research skills in the following areas:
    • advanced online searching;
    • documentation management;
    • data collection methods and analysis; and
  4. begin formulating research question and proposed study.

Assessment

Written assessment (3,500 - 4,000 words) (60%)
Oral presentation (40%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing (Honours) (M3704)


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Julia Morphet

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit provides students with the opportunity to develop an appropriate hypothesis or research question and derive an appropriate research design showing regard to the practical problems of conducting research in in nursing or midwifery settings. Ethical issues in research are also considered. Students will develop their own research proposal and seek ethical approval to conduct their study under the supervision of an academic staff member.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. identify a research topic that addresses a significant nursing or midwifery issue;
  2. develop a research problem, question or hypothesis;
  3. formulate and present a research plan;
  4. describe the theoretical basis behind the topic and research design;
  5. develop and present a research proposal, including a literature review;
  6. identify issues related to the conduct of the proposed research;
  7. participate in research seminars and workshops;
  8. apply to ethics committees for research approval as necessary; and
  9. demonstrate a collaborative and critical approach to research.

Assessment

Research proposal (3,500 - 4,000 words) (Hurdle)
Oral presentation (15 minutes) (Hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing (Honours)(1249 or M3704)


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Julia Morphet

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit provides students with the opportunity to implement the research proposal developed in NUR4402. Students will further develop a literature review, finalise ethical approval for their research, and collect, organise and manage the data for the study. With their research supervisors, students will explore a range of issues that can arise during the research process.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. generate a critical review of the literature and theoretical frameworks relevant to their field of study;
  2. accurately collect, manage and secure data for research activities;
  3. demonstrate an awareness of ethical and privacy issues as they apply to their research proposal;
  4. work collaboratively with a research supervisor to achieve research milestones (e.g. submission of ethics proposal);
  5. finalise the ethics approval process for the project;
  6. respond appropriately to the realities of research project issues including identification of a research site (or sites) and recruitment of participants;
  7. conduct a pilot study (if appropriate) to anticipate and address practical problems that may arise in the course of data collection;
  8. undertake data collection both accurately and ethically;
  9. discuss issues arising during the research process;
  10. demonstrate effective progress towards research plan;
  11. write to an academic standard by incorporating existing research findings and supervisor feedback; and
  12. present research findings in a seminar context.

Assessment

Research report (3,500 - 4,000 words) (Hurdle)
Oral presentation (15 minutes) (Hurdle)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing (Honours)(1249 or M3704), or Bachelor of Midwifery (Honours) (3564)


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Coordinator(s)

Dr Julia Morphet

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit provides students with the opportunity to develop appropriate research knowledge and skills as they, with the assistance of a supervisor, analyse and interpret the data collected in Clinical Honours Thesis III. Following this, the research will be written in the form of a literature review and article suitable for publication, and be presented at a research seminar. The clinical/midwifery practice in this unit will allow the student to exit the program at the level of an advanced novice practitioner.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Conduct appropriate data analysis and interpretation;
  2. Generate a report on the project, demonstrating critical analysis and discussion of findings in the context of prior research showing due regard to relevant stylistic conventions;
  3. Present research findings in a seminar context;
  4. Demonstrate an ability to manage data collection and analysis;
  5. Work collaboratively with a research supervisor to achieve research milestones;
  6. Write to an appropriate academic standard by incorporating existing research findings and supervisor feedback;
  7. Respond appropriately to realities of research project issues (e.g. ethical and practical issues surrounding confidentiality, data management etc.);
  8. Analyse and present data in a clear, concise and systematic manner;
  9. Identify strengths and limitations in their research design;
  10. Suggest directions for future research in their specialist area; and
  11. Address practicalities of research project management.

Assessment

Submission of a portfolio consisting of
a literature review (5,000 words) and at least one academic paper suitable for publication (5,000 words)
Or
Dissertation (10,000 words).

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing (Honours)(1249 or M3704), or Bachelor of Midwifery (Honours) (3564)


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Ms Janeane Dart

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

In this unit, students' transition into the tertiary setting will be supported and the roles, responsibilities and expectations of students as healthcare profession students will be outlined. They will be engaged via adult learning teaching and learning principles in this unit as they begin to develop their professional identity. This unit will commence students on the pathway to becoming experts in food (knowledge and application) and culturally competent, self aware healthcare professionals.

Food and culture will provide the core content for students to apply, integrate and develop/extend personal and professional attributes and competencies, communication and interpersonal skills. Enhanced cultural awareness for students will be a key outcome of this unit and this will be contextualized as students learn about food/food ingredients, eating patterns, why we eat what we eat and the Australian food supply system. Interprofessional learning opportunities with other healthcare profession students will help strengthen the learning in this unit. Students will be introduced to reflective practice and commence a professional portfolio.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Develop effective communication skills including constructive feedback to peers, reflective writing and self awareness.
  2. Describe the diverse work roles for nutrition practice and the professional attitudes and behaviours required to meet workplace expectations.
  3. Collaborate in effective teams respecting diversity of opinions and approaches to tasks.
  4. Identify key determinants of culture and recognise the potential influence of culture on health behaviour, beliefs and choices.
  5. Investigate the foods, food ingredients, historical influences and varied cultural eating patterns found in Australia.
  6. Develop a perspective on issues of social equity and justice, demonstrating an awareness of self in relation to diverse and vulnerable populations and as a future nutrition professional.

Assessment

Assignments (Group oral presentation - 10 minutes & Individual essay - 2,000 words (50%)
Professional portfolio - 10 x Weekly tasks (300 words each) (50%)

Workload requirements

12 hours per week including contact hours and private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

NUT1101 and must be enrolled in courses 3404, 4530 or 3956.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Claire Palermo

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will introduce students to epidemiology and biostatistics as the core of population health and nutrition research and practice. This will include consideration of basic statistics, study design, quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry and ethical issues related to research and population health interventions. Emphasis is placed on a population view of health, nutrition and disease and the social determinants of health and the application of epidemiology and statistics in assessment of disease in population and the effects of nutrition interventions. An introduction to the concepts and approaches to working in population health and nutrition will also be explored

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Interpret the demographics of the Australian population including Indigenous, minority and disadvantaged groups, their nutrition and health issues.
  2. Explore the health and nutrition needs of priority population groups in Australia.
  3. Evaluate a socio-ecological approach to improving health.
  4. Analyse the socio-cultural, economic, environmental and political determinants of health, the social versus the medical model of health, level of prevention and public health as a discipline.
  5. Search the scientific literature related to common questions on nutrition and health.
  6. Critically evaluate the scientific literature, including all forms of study designs, related to nutrition and health and communicate findings.
  7. Design quality research questions on nutrition and health.
  8. Practise conducting statistical analysis using methods common to nutrition research.
  9. Perform basic methods of qualitative data collection and analysis.

Assessment

Analysis of Indigenous program/policy (20%)
Critical analysis of a scientific paper (20%)
Analytical essay (20%)
Exam (40%)

Workload requirements

8 hours contact per week plus 16 hours self directed study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

NUT1102 and must be enrolled in courses 3404, 4530 or 3956.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Ms Andrea Bryce

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection priority for students taking Bachelor of Nutrition Science.

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit focuses on basic concepts in human nutrition. It will introduce the concepts of energy balance and body composition and outline the process of digestion. It will describe the role and function of macro and micronutrients essential for human health, their history of discovery, and relevance for the health of populations and individuals. The dietary recommendations for optimal nutrition for the Australian population will be compared with recommendations in other countries. The unit will include the clinical signs and symptoms of specific nutrient deficiency and excess, as well as nutrient interactions and their significance. Methods of nutrition assessment will be explored focussing on methods used to assess food intake, data analysis using qualitative and quantitative methods; and comparison of this data to recommended dietary intakes for optimal health.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the process of digestion and absorption of macro and micronutrients and discriminate between their respective role(s) in the human body.
  2. Identify foods sources of particular nutrients, and recognise the clinical signs and symptoms of particular nutrient deficiencies and excesses, and explain the reason for their development.
  3. Describe basic dietary assessment techniques and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different methods of assessing food intake when evaluating nutritional status.
  4. Explain how food composition data is obtained and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this data in diet evaluation.
  5. State current nutritional recommendations for the general population and apply them to evaluate the adequacy of diets.
  6. Recognise the effects that nutrients may have on the absorption and utilization of other nutrients.

Assessment

Online quiz assessment (10%)
End of semester examination (3 hours) (50%)
Assignments (40%)

Workload requirements

6 hours per week of scheduled class / online contact plus 6 hours self-study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course M2001.

Prohibitions


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Tracy McCaffrey

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is on a first-in, first enrolled basis.

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Online)
  • Summer semester B 2016 (Online)

Synopsis

This unit focuses on basic concepts in human nutrition. It will describe the role and function of macro and micronutrients essential for human health, their history of discovery, and relevance for the health of populations and individuals. The unit will include the clinical signs and symptoms of specific nutrient deficiency and excess, nutrient interactions and their significance, recommended dietary intakes and global epidemiology. It will cover methods used to assess food intake and data analysis by the use of food composition tables, patterns of restricted eating, diet myths and misconceptions and population specific nutritional issues.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Distinguish the role(s) of macro and micronutrients in the human body.
  2. Identify foods which are rich sources of particular nutrients, and which foods are important sources of particular nutrients in specific diets.
  3. Recognise the clinical signs and symptoms of particular nutrient deficiencies and excesses, and explain the reason for their development.
  4. Appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of different methods of assessing food intake and to critically assess the information derived from them.
  5. Appreciate the effects that nutrients may have on the absorption and utilization of other nutrients, and on medications.

Assessment

Online quiz assessment (10%)
End of semester examination (3 hours) (50%)
Assignments (40%)

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Aimee Dordevic

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit focuses on developing students' fundamental scientific knowledge as the basis for dietetics practice and nutrition science. This unit takes a scientific approach to growth and development of the human body incorporating biochemistry, genetics and physiology with an emphasis on a case based learning approach to knowledge application. Student centered teaching and learning methods will be used to support the delivery of the unit content. Students' participation as adult learners will be encouraged through the curricula with emphasis on the development of basic scientific communication skills.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate sound foundation knowledge of basic sciences to include biochemistry, genetics and physiology relevant to human nutrition and dietetics.
  2. Describe the chemical and biochemical aspects in biological molecules and the common reactions found in metabolic systems.
  3. Describe mechanisms of genetic inheritance and the mechanisms governing the flow of formation from DNA to RNA to protein.
  4. Describe mechanisms of gene expression and regulation, gene replication and repair and the causes and implications of genetic mutations.
  5. Describe the structure and function of cells and their diversification into tissues and major organ systems.
  6. Describe the general function of major organ systems and their interconnection in the human body.
  7. Explain the aspects of cellular metabolism in terms of energy release and dietary input.
  8. Briefly describe the main stages of human development and compare cellular growth, change in metabolism and nutrient requirements across the lifespan.
  9. Demonstrate basic knowledge and skill in laboratory experimentation and in the reporting and collation of experimental data.

Assessment

Assignments (40%)
Exams (60%) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

11 hours contact per week plus 13 hours self directed study.
3 x 2 hours lectures, 1 x 2 hours tutorial and 1 x 3 hours practical.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites

NUT1001 or NUT1010. Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nutrition Science or Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours).


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Aimee Dordevic

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

The unit will introduce food science particularly the chemistry of food components in their raw and cooked state. It will introduce food preparation and cooking skills, sensory evaluation of food, food processing, production, packaging and storage. Methods of analysing food for nutrient and non-nutrient content will be examined. Teaching will be based on interactive lectures with explicit learning objectives. These will be supplemented by tutorials to support student learning and by kitchen and laboratory practical sessions for the acquisition of basic skills in food selection, storage, preparation, cooking and food analysis.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the chemistry of macronutrients, micronutrients and non-nutrients in food.
  2. Describe the impact of the processing, production, packaging and storage of food on the nutrient and non-nutritive components of food and relate this chemistry to food taste, texture and palatability.
  3. Describe and demonstrate the principles of safe food handling.
  4. Compare and contrast Australian and International food composition data including the varying methods used to analyse nutrient content of foods and apply these data to calculate the nutrient intake of healthy individuals.
  5. Demonstrate food preparation and food analysis techniques.

Assessment

6 x Laboratory & kitchen practical reports (approx. 500 words each) (50%)
Attendance (80% of practical sessions) (Hurdle)
Final exam (3 hours) (50%) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

6 hours contact per week plus 6 hours self directed study.
Weekly contact hours = 3 x 1 hours lectures, 1 x 1 hours tutorial and equivalent of 1 x 2 hours practical.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

BND1002 and must be enrolled in course M2001.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Ms Evelyn Volders

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection is on a first-in, first enrolled basis.

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit focuses on health behaviours, growth and development, physical activity and nutritional requirements for groups across the lifespan from infancy to old age. It will focus on normal nutrition, physiology, physical activity and growth and development for lifespan groups and vulnerable groups. The unit will draw on principles from psychology that will allow students to understand how health beliefs, illness and other factors impact on actions. Concepts of health education and promotion will enhance students' knowledge and ability to communicate nutrition messages effectively to groups. The unit will incorporate elements of personal and professional development such as cultural competency, social justice, translation of technical information into practical advice about food and eating, communication skills, reflection and teamwork.

This unit will focus on Theme 3 (Nutrition fundamentals in Health and Disease) and Theme 2 (Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition) and Theme 2 objectives but will also include aspects of Theme 1 (Personal development and professional practice) and Theme 4 (Food: from Science to Systems) with an integrated assessment task and Theme 4 (From Science to System).

Site visits to care settings such as child care and/or aged care will enhance the learning experience and provide an applied real life context to theory.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss and apply links between growth and development and health (including nutrition) and human behaviour across the lifespan;
  2. Develop skills in integrating knowledge into practice consistent with best available evidence in nutritional needs and health education of groups;
  3. Discuss how psychological, cultural, personal, economic and social factors influence health behaviours;
  4. Discuss physical activity guidelines, evidence and recommendations across the lifespan;
  5. Relate the theoretical basis of health education and health promotion to practice;
  6. Plan, implement and evaluate a group education session;
  7. Present an innovative approach to nutrition education for groups;
  8. Apply the knowledge of health education, nutrition and human behaviour to describe, develop and evaluate education resource material;
  9. Extend communication skills in a safe environment considering social, physical and cultural factors;
  10. Practice professional attitudes and behaviours including reflection, self evaluation and team work.

Fieldwork

Students will be expected to complete a child care and an aged care centre visit to fulfill the requirements for this unit.

Assessment

Exam (40%) (Hurdle)
Menu planning for groups (1,500 words) (15%)
Group education assignment and presentations (25%)
Professional portfolio development (2,000 words) (20%)

Workload requirements

4 x 2 hours per week lectures/tutorials on campus.
2 x 2 hours practical sessions/tutorials on campus.
12 hours self study and assessment related work are recommended per week in addition.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses M2001, 4530 or 3956.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kate Huggins

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will focus on developing students as researchers. It builds on knowledge and skills developed in Year 1 on the role of evidence in nutrition science, statistics, epidemiology and research methods.It will embrace the concepts and application of systematic literature review and quantitative and qualitative data related to nutrition. Students will be supported to apply and practice these research skills in a safe classroom environment and via hypothetical models while applying real and relevant data collection and analysis tools to current, pertinent and important research questions in nutrition. The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 2: Determinants and Influences on Population Health and Nutrition coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 3: Nutrition Fundamentals of Health and Disease.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Critically appraise scientific literature and research methods;
  2. Conduct a hypothetical research study relating to a nutrition issue;
  3. Apply methods of qualitative and quantitative data collection, analysis and communication in controlled environment;
  4. Develop and implement a systematic review protocol for a nutrition related research question;
  5. Synthesise and communicate findings from scientific literature in the field of nutrition.

Assessment

Group systematic literature review (4,000 words) (50%) (Hurdle)
Individual scientific report (4,000 - 5,000 words) (50%) (Hurdle)
Assessment task ethics forms (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

3 hours contact per week lectures/tutorials/teaching sessions on campus.
9 hours self study and assessment related work.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 3404, 4530 or 3956.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Maxine Bonham

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides a strong foundation in supporting students to become experts in the area of food - from the cellular scientific makeup and composition to food microbiology, food regulations and standards coupled with skill based acquisition, exploring the diversity of food and eating practices with an application to nutrition and dietetic practice. Theme 4 (Food from Science to Systems) is the key theme explored in this unit with integration from Theme 1 (Personal Development and Professional Practice) as students extend their skills in cultural competency and communication and the scientific underpinnings from Theme 3 (Nutrition Fundamentals of Health and Disease). In this unit, students will acquire food preparation skills; become familiar with Australia's diverse foods and modify recipes and menus to meet specific nutritional goals. They will also compare food service settings providing food for the general population and to outline the training and skills required for food service staff. Students will gain an appreciation of micro-organisms and the important role they play in food production and in food-borne disease; becoming proficient in risk assessment and safe food handling practices. They will discuss the regulatory system set up in Australia to control food safety, food labelling and food content and gain experience in evaluating the role of science and politics within the regulatory decision-making process.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify foods macronutrient and micronutrient composition from the main food groups and cultures found in Australia and evaluate the impact of globalisation on Australia's food supply.
  2. Demonstrate a basic competence in cooking.
  3. Explain the chemistry of food during its production, processing, cooking and storage and relate this chemistry to food taste, texture, palatability and nutritional value.
  4. Describe the diversity of microorganisms and discuss their relationships in the context of food, nutrition, health and disease.
  5. Exhibit laboratory skills required to culture and identify micro-organisms.
  6. Compare food processing systems and design procedures to promote a safe food supply particularly for food service operations.
  7. Describe the role of the Commonwealth and State governments in Australia in formulating, implementing and enforcing modern food law, including international standards.
  8. Explain the format and content of the Australian Food Standards Code including the FSANZ processes required to ensure a safe Australian food supply.
  9. Outline the fundamental principles of toxicology and risk assessment and their application to the setting of standards and the monitoring and surveillance of a safe food supply.
  10. Critically evaluate regulations relating to food labelling, food composition and food-related claims in Australia and assess compliance across the food supply.
  11. Describe the process of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) in food production and supply and be able to design a HACCP plan.
  12. Develop and apply written and oral communication skills with peers in a supportive environment.
  13. Evaluate practice of self and peers.

Assessment

Food portfolio (30%)
Assignments (30%)
Exams (40%) (Hurdle)

Hurdle: End of semester exam - MCQ, short answer and essay-style questions.

Workload requirements

24 hours/week including contact hours and private study.
3 x 2 hours lectures/week; one 2 hours practical class or demonstration per week; one 4 hours practical class per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 3404, 4530 or 3956.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Ricardo Costa and Dr Julia Choate

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will focus on developing students' fundamental scientific knowledge in the areas of biochemistry, physiology, anatomy and immunology as the basis for nutrition and dietetics practice. The areas of pharmacology and genetics will be included as the role of nutrition in these sciences is increasingly emphasised. The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 3: Nutrition Fundamentals of Health and Disease coupled with partial integration of content and application from Theme 1: Personal Development and Professional Practice and Theme 4: Food from Science to systems. This unit will take a scientific approach to understanding the anatomy and physiology of the human body in growth and development and the impact of dietary input on cellular and metabolic processes whilst recognising the neuroendocrine control of nutrients within the body and the role of essential micronutrients in immune function. Teaching will focus on a case based learning approach to knowledge application.

Outcomes

  1. Explain the key structures and functions of the gastrointestinal system, and interpret the effects of nutrition, health or disease on its function;
  2. Explain the key structures and functions of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and interpret the effects of nutrition, health or disease on its function;
  3. Explain the key structures and functions of the innate and adaptive immune systems, and interpret the effects of nutrition, health or disease on its function;
  4. Explain the key structures and functions of the musculoskeletal system, and interpret the effects of nutrition, health or disease on its function;
  5. Explain the key physiological and biochemical systems and processes, and their interactions within the whole body approach;
  6. Describe the organisation and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and discuss neuroendocrine control of the body;
  7. Describe the role of innate and acquired immunity in health and disease;
  8. Evaluate the role of food components (nutrients and non-nutrients) in physiological and biochemical systems and processes as it related to health and disease;
  9. Describe the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of common drugs, and their interaction with nutrients;
  10. Define nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics, and its role in nutritional screening;
  11. Explain how the individual genome can change requirements for specific nutrients;
  12. Critically discuss the integration of physiological and biochemical systems and processes within significant nutrition issues relating to health and disease;
  13. Apply scientific knowledge of the integration of body systems to nutrition related scenarios;
  14. Interpret data and demonstrate skills in the conduct and reporting of laboratory experiments;
  15. Demonstrate the ability to clearly communicate complex scientific concepts.

Assessment

5 x Practical reports (500 words each) (20%)
Case study (group presentation) and wiki resource (1000 words)) (10%).
Critical appraisal report (3000 words) (10%).
2 x Mid semester exams (MCQ) (2 hours each) (20%)
2 x End of semester exams (3 hours each) (40%) (Hurdle)

Hurdle: End of semester examinations are a hurdle requirement

Workload requirements

6 x 2 hours per week lectures/tutorials on campus.
1 x 3 hours practical on campus.
21 hours self study and assessment related work.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

Dr Ricardo Costa and Dr Julia Choate

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses 3404, 4530 or 3956.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Assoc Prof Maxine Bonham and Dr Chiara Murgia

Offered

Clayton

  • Full year 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit provides the opportunity for students to work with an academic supervisor to conduct a focused research project in the broad area of human nutrition. The research project may be chosen from a list of projects available at the beginning of semester from the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics. During this unit you will have the opportunity to utilise and apply knowledge and intellectual, practical and other skills acquired throughout your studies to enable you to undertake your research project. A major output of this unit is the final project report.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Apply appropriate research methods in order to carry out scientific research and recognise the significance and relevance of the data and results obtained.
  2. Integrate knowledge in the identification, description, analysis and solution of a research problem in the field of human nutrition.
  3. Articulate clear research aims, methods and rationale.
  4. Show appropriate skills in applying methods and techniques relevant to your chosen project.
  5. Show initiative and independence, and manage your time and resources effectively to complete a project within allocated time scales.
  6. Utilise relevant information sources for the planning, conduct and writing up of a project.
  7. Maintain accurate, accessible records of data collection, decisions made and their rationale in a reflective workbook.
  8. Utilise suitable software packages for data manipulation and the preparation of typewritten documents.
  9. Evaluate the experimental approach adopted and recognise its strengths and limitations, and compare and integrate your project findings with findings from previous work reported in the literature or elsewhere.
  10. Prepare a structured, coherent project submission, via a series of drafts that are subject to repeated improvement and updating.
  11. Engage in critical discussion of the conduct of your project and the significance of its findings in an oral defence (three minute thesis).

Assessment

Oral presentation (10%)
Submission of thesis or systematic review (Project proposal 20%; Scientific paper 50%) (70%)
Reflective workbook or laboratory notebook (10%)
Supervisor report (10%)

Workload requirements

24 hours per week of project work and private study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in course 3956.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Nicole Kellow

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Diet and disease is an integrated study of the role of diet in the causation and treatment of chronic diseases that are endemic in westernised societies. This unit builds upon the scientific concept of disease aetiology explored in Integrated Science Systems (BND2103) and the critical interpretation of scientific literature and research skills developed in years 1 and 2. Learners will explore the epidemiology of the major nutrition related diseases, their causal pathways and population based recommendation for prevention. The rationale for the application of dietary modifications for patients with specific disease states and the means of evaluating dietary treatment is explored. Nutrition related emerging issues in disease aetiology and management are also explored and the emphasis on the important role of genetic susceptibility in nutrition science is continued.

Student centered teaching and learning methods will be used to support the delivery of the unit content. Students' participation as adult learners will be encouraged through the curricula with emphasis on extending their scientific communication skills.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Assess the role, benefits and limitations of diet, activity and lifestyle in aetiology, prevention and management of chronic diseases;
  2. Explore the role of genetics and nutrition (nutrigenomics) in the development of disease;
  3. Appraise the functional role of nutraceuticals in disease management and prevention;
  4. Apply epidemiology, medical and nutritional principles in the nutritional assessment and management of chronic lifestyle related diseases conditions;
  5. Discuss emerging trends in diet related disease risk and treatment approaches;
  6. Synthesise the scientific evidence using an evidence based approach.

Assessment

Scientific essay (2,000 words) (30%)
Evidence based resource (1,000 words) (20%)
Exam (3 hours) (50%) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

Lectures: 3 hours/week, Tutorials: 1 hour/week, SDL: 10 hours/week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Must have passed all units in NUT2001, NUT2002, NUT2102 and NUT2103;
OR must have passed NUT1011 and two from BCH2022, BMS2021, BMS2031, HSC1101, HSC1102, PHY2032 or PHY2042.
Master of Dietetics students are exempt from pre-requisites.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Ricardo Costa

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit is focused on students' developing knowledge, skills, and competencies to critically evaluate current developments in sport and exercise nutrition, targeting both health and sports performance outcomes in a variety of populations. The scientific disciplines of exercise physiology, biochemistry and immunology will be emphasised as students critically evaluate the underlying evidence supporting benchmark nutritional guidelines and recommendations given to individuals/groups partaking in exercise. Laboratory sessions will provide practical experience of various anthropometrical, nutritional and hydration assessment techniques; alongside applying knowledge of area specific theories into practice through a kitchen laboratory session. Particular reference to the roles and responsibilities of the sport and exercise nutrition expert when working in multi-disciplinary teams will be emphasised.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Evaluate the role of macro- and micro-nutrients in human energy transfer systems active during different types of exercise, and recognise the nutritional implications;
  2. Appraise the effect exercise and the environment have on various body systems and body composition;
  3. Evaluate nutritional and hydration assessment techniques in sport and exercise;
  4. Assess nutritional, hydration and exercise requirements for active individuals performing at different sporting activities and levels and develop appropriate exercise and nutrition regimes;
  5. Critically appraise the evidence base to justify food, fluid, supplement and other management strategies for improving sport and exercise performance.

Assessment

Critical Essay (2500 words) 40%
Laboratory Practical Reports (3 x 500 words) 20%
Case Study (1000 words) 20%
Oral Presentation (20 minutes) 20%

Workload requirements

12 x 2 hour per week lectures/tutorials on campus, 12 x 2 hour per week seminars on campus (delivered twice, seminar groups A and B), 3 x 3 hour practical sessions (physiology, hydration, kitchen lab) - (delivered twice, seminar groups A and B).

36 hours self-study and formative/summative assessment related work.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUT2103; OR
NUT1011 and two units from BCH2022, BMS2021, BMS2031, HSC1101, HSC1102, PHY2032 or PHY2042.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Tracy McCaffrey and Dr Chiara Murgia

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Nutrition controversies will focus on developing student's fundamental scientific knowledge and critical reasoning skills in the area of nutritional science. Building from earlier units that taught principles relating to evaluation of evidence and advanced research methodologies combined with a solid background in physiology, immunology and biochemistry this unit will link diet and disease outcomes using available evidence.

This unit will enable nutritionists to develop an appreciation for the controversial and unresolved nature of the reported associations between dietary factors and disease processes by providing the opportunity for in-depth, critical evaluation of the underpinning evidence and identification of unresolved questions and/or alternative opinions. Examples of current nutritional controversies will be drawn from topics studied across the range of other units on the course and students allocated to two topics.

Teaching activities in this unit will have an emphasis on student centered enquiry supported by a series of student-led seminars and discussions and a written synthesis of assigned topics.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Detail the scientific background and current consensus of opinion in a selected area of controversial research in human nutrition.
  2. Identify the major sources of nutritional literature in a systemic way in order to collect information in a selected topic.
  3. Critically evaluate scientific evidence underpinning a selected area of research in human nutrition.
  4. Discuss scientific literature and draw reasoned conclusions.
  5. Formulate an opinion based on a critical review of the existing evidence for a specific topic in topics related to human nutrition.
  6. Engage in critical discussions on the nutritional controversies assigned.
  7. Competently communicate scientific knowledge and understanding in oral and written formats.

Assessment

Critical report 1 and 2 (60%)
Oral presentation 1 and 2 (40%)

Workload requirements

Seminars: 2 hours/week, Tutorials: 1 hour/week, SDL: 10 hours/week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUT2001 and NUT2002; OR HSC1101, HSC1102 and NUT1011; OR Must have passed NUT1011 and two units BCH2022, BMS2021, BMS2031, HSC1101, HSC1102, PHY2032 or PHY2042.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Tracy McCaffrey

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection priority for students taking Bachelor of Nutrition Science.

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Monitoring and evaluation are essential components of determining nutritional status both at the individual and population level. Therefore the interpretation of information from dietary, laboratory, anthropometric and clinical studies is central to the work of nutrition science students. In this unit, students will examine the methodological applications and limitations surrounding dietary assessment, body composition and biochemical tests. Students will be enabled to critically employ research skills when analysing nutrition related data by identifying appropriate methods, in terms of precision, validity and reproducibility for assessing dietary intake, body composition and nutritional status using biochemical tests. Students will be exposed to a number of anthropometric and dietary intake methods, as well as nutrition screening tools routinely used in both the clinical and research settings.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Assess food consumption at national, household and individual levels.
  2. Communicate with individuals employing effective interview techniques.
  3. Utilise a variety of dietary assessment methods with an understanding of precision, reproducibility and validity.
  4. Assess anthropometry and body composition in individuals.
  5. Assess nutritional status by interpreting relevant biochemical and pathology tests.
  6. Estimate nutritional requirements of individuals.
  7. Identify and utilise nutrition screening tools.
  8. Employ effective research skills in analysing nutrition-related data.

Assessment

Weighed vs. estimated food diary and individual/group nutrition assessment (3,000 words) (50%)
Anthropometric practical exam (500 words) (25%)
Multiple choice questions (1.5 hours) (25%)
Micronutrient lab test summary (Formative) (Peer assessment)
Interview skills reflection (Formative) (Peer assessment)

Workload requirements

On-campus: 6 hours per week of interactive lectures and workshops + 6 hours self-directed learning and completion of assessment tasks.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Must have passed all of NUT2001, NUT2102 and NUT2103; or Must have passed all of HSC1101, HSC1102 and NUT1011.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nutrition Science or Bachelor of Health Science.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Liza Barbour

Quota applies

This unit is quota restricted. Selection priority for students taking Bachelor of Nutrition Science.

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit aims to explore the sustainability of the food supply and its impact on health. Students will learn about the components of the food supply system (from paddock to plate) and the factors, including economic, social, political and environmental that drive and influence the food system. Students will compare and contrast the agricultural, retail and consumption differences between an industrial and a local food system. Exposure to several programs and initiatives which aim to mitigate the environmental effects of food production and create a more sustainable food supply with support learning. The impact of environmental challenges, such as climate change, drought and salinity, and the impact of national policy decisions on the food system will be explored. Students will be exposed to the views of the food industry, economists and public health experts on food sustainability and explore their own food intake patterns and its impact on the environment.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the Australian food system and critically evaluate the influences on this system.
  2. Compare and contrast social, economic and environmental differences between an industrial and local food system.
  3. Evaluate the impact of population and individual nutrition and health messages on the food supply.
  4. Describe the impact of food waste and discuss strategies to minimise food waste in food service and household settings.
  5. Evaluate the political, economic, health and environmental drivers impacting on the international food system.
  6. Explore opportunities for beneficial social, environmental and nutritional change to the Australian food supply.

Assessment

Exam (Multiple choice and short answer) (2 hours) (30%)
Individual food eco-friendly food challenge (1,000 words) and resource (500 words) (30%)
Local food system audit (3,000 words) (40%)

Workload requirements

On-campus: 4 hours per week of interactive lectures and workshops + 8 hours self-directed learning and completion of assessment tasks.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Must have passed both NUT1002 and NUT2102 or all three of HSC1101, HSC1102 and NUT1011.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nutrition Science or Bachelor of Health Science.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Maxine Bonham

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Flexible)

Synopsis

This unit allows students to undertake a work placement within their degree discipline for 12 weeks. The work placement will provide students with the opportunity to gain practical experience in real-life settings. Students will undertake approved projects for an employer, which will contribute to the organisation and facilitate the development of work place skills and application of knowledge to a practical situation. Students will develop understanding and skills relevant to job planning, time management and the requirements of working with others in a position of responsibility. To receive academic credit, students must complete the work tasks assigned to them as part of their placement. They must also complete a series of academic assessment tasks under the joint supervision of a representative of the sponsor and an academic from the Faculty.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Accept responsibility for and manage, implement and evaluate their personal and professional development and show a commitment to life-long learning.
  2. Demonstrates insight and makes plans for continuous professional development in collaboration with peers and mentors to advance learning in Nutrition Science.
  3. Use negotiation, teamwork and conflict resolution skills to promote best practice.
  4. Critically evaluate relevant scientific evidence, communicate and apply findings to practice.
  5. Create solutions which match and solve problems identified in professional setting.
  6. Adopt effective project management, team work and communication skills and work effectively within the placement organisation.
  7. Adopt a questioning and critical approach in all aspects of project work.
  8. Organise, establish and document data, process and communication on a nutrition science issue into written reports and oral presentations to acceptable professional standards.

Fieldwork

Placement component: 3 days a week for 11 weeks to be split between a number of work placement sites. Travel requirements: Domestic travel to some work placement sites may be required (dependent on placement site).

Assessment

Project proposal (1,500 words) (30%)
Project report (1,500 words) (50%)
Project presentation (10 minutes) with reflective account (1,000 words) (20%)
Supervisor report (Ungraded) (Hurdle)

Workload requirements

24 hours a week - as combination of taught component (weeks 1 and 2), work placement (weeks 2 - 12) and assessment tasks.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in Bachelor of Nutrition Science.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Ms Liza Barbour

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

This unit will review the concepts and approaches of population health in the context of nutrition. The content will explore current public health nutrition practice issues related to priority issues such as obesity, food security and the food supply. A systems based, health promotion framework to addressing priority nutrition issues will be discussed and current public health nutrition practice will be evaluated. Students will explore the political foundations of public health policy in Australia including the impact of public health policies and will develop skills in policy analysis and public health advocacy. This unit will provide students with the foundations knowledge in preparation for the development of skills of the practice of public health nutrition. The key theme explored in this unit is Theme 2: Determinants and influences on population health and nutrition coupled with partial integration of content from Theme 4: Food: from science to systems.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the current key public health nutrition priorities and issues in Australia and the policy frameworks that support these.
  2. Appraise the political, environmental, social and economic influences on public health nutrition goals and practice.
  3. Explore opportunities for beneficial social, environmental and nutritional change to the Australian food supply.
  4. Evaluate how public health policy may influence food consumption and nutrition status.
  5. Apply a socio-ecological, systems based approach to understanding and managing population nutrition issues.
  6. Employ best practice frameworks and approaches for planning, implementation and evaluation of these issues in the development of nutrition interventions.
  7. Explain the use of and process of public health advocacy and apply the advocacy framework to a current public health nutrition issue.

Assessment

Mid-semester test (2 hours) (30%)
Policy analysis assignment (Group) - Written piece of work (3,000 words) and oral presentation (15 minutes) (40%)
Advocacy discussion paper (Individual) (2,000 words) (30%) with class debate (Ungraded)

Workload requirements

Week 1 - 4 x 6 hours workshops, Weeks 2 to 9 - 3 hours per week (interactive classes and tutorials) ^ hours self-directed study.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites

NUT1010, NUT1002 and NUT1102. Master of Dietetics students are exempt from pre-requisites.

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in courses M6002, 3956 or 3882.


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kate Huggins

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

A weekly course over 12 weeks on research skills including: study design, use of relevant databases, statistical analysis software, how to search and summarise the scientific literature, best practice in data presentation, qualitative and quantitative statistical analysis and skills in evidenced based review and critical analysis of scientific writing.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. explain different study designs and major methodologies used for quantitative and qualitative research, and interpret data drawn from the scientific literature relating to nutrition;
  2. explain the procedure of how to perform a comprehensive evidenced-based systematic literature review;
  3. display competency in the use of relevant databases, spreadsheets and statistical analysis software;
  4. explain the issues covered in making a submission to an ethics committee for approval of research projects; and
  5. communicate through a range of modes including: scientific discussions, oral presentation and written work.

Assessment

Assessment from NUT4111 will contribute to 15% to the final mark for Bachelor of Nutrition (Honours) degree comprising:
Critique of a scientific paper & ethical review - Quantitative method (2,500 words) (45%)
Critique of a scientific paper & ethical review - Qualitative methods (2,500 words (45%)
MCQ (1 hour) (10%)

Workload requirements

Lecture/tutorials: 2 hours per week; assignments and self-directed learning: 8 hours per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kate Huggins

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)
  • Full year 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Each student will undertake a research project under the supervision of an approved member of the academic or research staff of Monash University. The choice of project and supervisor will be the responsibility of the student, in consultation with an academic advisor for the Nutrition and Dietetics unit. The research project will constitute the major portion of the students' work and will be conducted over a full year. This unit will include the components of literature review and description of methods. Students will present their research proposal in a seminar format.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. gain experience in undertaking an evidenced-based review of the scientific literature in their discipline;
  2. discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed study design for their research project;
  3. describe the methodology required for their research project and summarise the logistical process involved in data collection;
  4. outline the main statistical methods that will be used in their research project and demonstrate competency in using the software programs required for these analyses; and
  5. demonstrate a high level of competency in oral communication skills to a specialist scientific audience.

Assessment

Assessment from NUT4121 will contribute 20% to the final mark for Bachelor of Nutrition (Honours) comprising:
Evidenced-based literature review (100%)*
Oral research proposal
Draft methods chapter

*Note that full quantitative assessment of this task will be undertaken at the end of Semester 2 in conjunction with Thesis examination.

Workload requirements

Research project related work: 36 hours per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Co-requisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

Coordinator(s)

Dr Kate Huggins

Offered

Clayton

  • First semester 2016 (Day)
  • Second semester 2016 (Day)
  • Full year 2016 (Day)

Synopsis

Each student will undertake a research project under the supervision of an approved member of the academic or research staff of Monash University. The choice of project and supervisor will be the responsibility of the student, in consultation with an academic advisor from the Nutrition and Dietetic unit. The research project will constitute the major portion of the students' work and will be conducted over a full year. This unit will include data collection and analysis and Thesis preparation. Students will present their research results in a seminar format.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. execute and analyse a research project, or analyse a set of studies;
  2. proficiently use computer based data manipulation, analysis, presentation and word processing;
  3. write up scientific work in a report suitable for publication;
  4. demonstrate well developed communication skills in both oral and written presentation to specialist scientific audience; and
  5. demonstrate a range of technical skills related to the research process appropriate for their project.

Assessment

Assessment from NUT4122 will contribute to 65% to the final mark for Bachelor of Nutrition (Honours) comprising:
Written thesis (Not more than 20,000 words) (95%)
Research process (5%)
Oral thesis presentation

Workload requirements

Research project related work: 42 hours per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Prerequisites


Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

Department of Occupational Therapy

Coordinator(s)

Dr Nikos Thomacos & Mr Luke Robinson

Offered

Peninsula

  • First semester 2016 (Day)

Notes

  • You are required to provide evidence of completing a Standard First Aid course;
  • You are required to provide evidence of compliance with FMNHS immunization policy requirements to Student Services;
  • You are required to provide evidence of Working with Children approval to Student Services;
  • You are required to provide evidence of Fit to Work / Police Check to Student Services.

Synopsis

This unit will provide students with the skills necessary to describe the role of an occupational therapist as distinct from other health professionals. Students will learn to demonstrate appropriate professional behaviour and beginner's competency with specific early clinical skills. The unit will support students to develop an awareness of the legal, cultural and ethical issues of practice, and begin to understand and articulate some of the challenges faced by clients/consumers of health services.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

Theme 1: Personal and Professional Development

  1. describe ethical and legal issues pertinent to a practicing occupational therapist;
  2. demonstrate effective communication and interview skills for practice;

Theme 2: Population Society and Health

  1. consider concepts of disability and appreciate the impact of disability upon the individual;

Theme 4: Applied Practice

  1. develop competent pre-clinical skills in client handling, equipment use and prescription, and the correct use of mobility techniques;
  2. examine safety and basic infection control issues in the workplace;
  3. apply task and activity analysis to the occupational therapy practice context.

Assessment

Summative tasks:
Disability experience (e.g., visual impairment, limited mobility) (2 hours) and disability experience reflective assignment (2,000 words) (30%)
Team building video assignment (in collaboration with physiotherapy students) (10%)
Outcomes of the occupational and activity analysis (2,000 words) (20%)
Class test 1 (1 hour) (20%)
Class test 2 (1 hour) (20%)

Hurdle tasks:
You are required to attend 100% of all scheduled unit tutorials unless documentary evidence (such as a medical certificate, relevant death notice, etc.) is provided.

Workload requirements

Lecture component: 2 hours per week, Tutorial/Practicum component: 2 hours per week, Private study: 8 hours per week.

See also Unit timetable information

Chief examiner(s)

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study