units

BNS2012

Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Undergraduate - Unit

This unit entry is for students who completed this unit in 2014 only. For students planning to study the unit, please refer to the unit indexes in the the current edition of the Handbook. If you have any queries contact the managing faculty for your course or area of study.

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6 points, SCA Band 2, 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Organisational UnitSchool of Psychological Sciences
OfferedNot offered in 2014
Coordinator(s)Associate Professor Stephen Robinson

Synopsis

This unit reviews the gross and cellular structure of the brain and higher structures that encapsulate the nervous system. The majority of the course examines the structural and functional organisation of the cerebellum, thalamus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebral cortex, vasculature and ventricular systems. Emphasis will be placed on how these various parts of the brain mediate behaviour and the neurological consequences that result from their dysfunction.

Outcomes

At the completion of the unit, students should be able to:

  1. Identify from pictures and brain specimens structures of the cerebellum, thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebral cortex, vasculature and ventricular systems;
  2. Describe in their own words and interpret the organisational, structural and functional aspects of the cerebellum, thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebral cortex, vasculature and ventricular systems;
  3. Deduce basic functional consequences related to damage to the above specific neurological structures and deduce the functional effects of occlusion to specific blood vessels of the vascular system;
  4. Compare and contrast normal neural function to specific deficits outlined in 3;
  5. From case studies with complex and/or unique neural damage, be able to predict and/or infer what functional consequences could result;
  6. From case studies with complex and/or unique neural damage, be able to suggest assessment methods and possible treatment approaches that might be adopted.

Assessment

2 x Written theory examinations (mid-semester, end of semester: short answer and/or multiple choice questions, 2-hours) (2 x 25%)
1-hour laboratory spot test (30%)
Weekly tutorial assessment (20%)

Chief examiner(s)

Workload requirements

6 contact hours + 6 additional hours per week.

Prerequisites

BNS2011

Additional information on this unit is available from the faculty at: