units

BIO3111

Faculty of Science

Undergraduate - Unit

This unit entry is for students who completed this unit in 2012 only. For students planning to study the unit, please refer to the unit indexes in the the current edition of the Handbook. If you have any queries contact the managing faculty for your course or area of study.

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6 points, SCA Band 0 (NATIONAL PRIORITY), 0.125 EFTSL

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered, or view unit timetables.

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Science
OfferedClayton First semester 2012 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Dr Rohan Clarke

Synopsis

Ecological knowledge needs to be incorporated in many areas of application, including natural resource management, invasive species responses, and biodiversity and conservation. The unit will focus on teaching core skills in applied ecology that should inform any management process. There is less emphasis on policy and legislative issues, except where they directly affect management decisions. The unit will focus on a range of issues that are of current importance in both academic research areas and also in important new policy developments in Victoria and in Australia generally. The practical component will consist of three projects that directly relate to the three lecture units within the unit.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit, students will have a grounding in the principles of landscape ecology, the application of the adaptive management process in natural resource management including ecological-economic trade-offs, issues and possible solutions to threats posed by invasive species, methods of biodiversity management and an understanding of the need to cater for genetic variation and evolutionary potential. Students will have a firm grounding in the ecological theory on which natural resource management is based. Students will become familiar with some of the techniques available to managers and decision-makers, be able to critically evaluate management techniques, be aware that management is conducted within a socio-economic framework, and be familiar with some of the main issues confronting biological resource managers today. They will be able to express informed opinions on the economic, ethical and political considerations of resource management.

Assessment

Examination (2 hours): 60%
Practical reports (three, 10% each): 30%
Feedback assignments (five, 2% each): 10%

Chief examiner(s)

Dr Rohan Clarke

Contact hours

Two 1-hour lectures and 3 hours laboratory work per week

Prerequisites

BIO2040 or BIO2042, and BIO2011, or permission