units

NUR4546

Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

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Monash University Handbook 2010 Undergraduate - Unit

6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
OfferedClayton First semester 2010 (Flexible)
Coordinator(s)TBA

Synopsis

The purpose of this unit is to demonstrate that nursing is and can be shaped by research. Emphasis is placed on the belief that investigative skills of all nurses are an integral part of their professional repertoire. Nursing research is about making a difference that matters to patient care. Reflecting upon one's practice and the systematic search for solutions to problems so that care may be improved are important elements of the research process. In undertaking this unit, students will be able to add to their own repertoire of skills to make their own practice more evidence-based, effective and rewarding.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this unit the student will be able to:

  1. Appreciate the importance of research to the foundation and development of the discipline of nursing

  1. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the research process

  1. Identify nursing problems that could be investigated by research

  1. Outline the strengths and limitations of the major research methodologies utilised in nursing

  1. Understand and perform simple descriptive statistical procedures

  1. Outline the processes associated with qualitative data analysis and perform a simple analysis of narrative data

  1. Identify ethical considerations involved with the research process

  1. Demonstrate an ability to read and critically analyse nursing research literature

Assessment

5 x short quizzes: 20%
Assignment (analysis and understanding of quantitative and qualitative data): 40%
Exam (2 hour): 40%
Reflective clinical log: Pass/Fail. Students must achieve a pass grade for the reflective clinical log in order to successfully complete this unit.

Chief examiner(s)

Associate Professor Tony Barnett