units

MUS1100

Faculty of Arts

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Monash University Handbook 2010 Undergraduate - Unit

6 points, SCA Band 1, 0.125 EFTSL

LevelUndergraduate
FacultyFaculty of Arts
OfferedClayton First semester 2010 (Day)
Coordinator(s)Paul Watt

Synopsis

Introduction to western music history, western music theory and ethnomusicology. Western music history of music from the Middle Ages to c.1800 including form, style and genre. Western music theory, tonal harmony, including triads, chords, seventh chords, chord inversions, harmonic analysis, modulation, and four-part voice leading. Ethnomusicology: Introduction to selected forms of world music and to associated concepts of ethnomusicology, including the social, ritual, and musical functions of the music.

Objectives

The first semester of this first-year music core unit is designed to introduce the beginning music student to three areas of music: Western music history, Western music theory, and World musics.



The Western music history lectures examine fundamental questions such as how composers write music, how music is performed in concerts and how music is organised in an historical framework with respect to form, style and genre. Students are guided in the appreciation, enjoyment and assessment of selected works from the Middle Ages to approximately 1800. A basic familiarity will be gained with a variety of set works, determining specific formal and stylistic traits within each musical tradition. The knowledge gained from this study can then be used as a basis for the further study of other works within each tradition.



The Western music theory lectures assist the beginning music student with the study of tonal harmony, including triads, chords, seventh chords, chord inversions, harmonic analysis, modulation, 4-part voice leading, etc. Four-part harmonisation of melodies and/or bass lines will be practiced in order to learn the functions of chords and chord progressions in the tonal system.



The World musics sessions provide an introduction to the performance genres of selected cultural traditions of World music and to associated concepts useful in ethnomusicology, including the social, ritual, and musical functions of the music. World music concepts of musical elegance, beauty, form, and meaning are examined in relation to similar concepts in the other visual and performing arts. Students are given the opportunity to perform some of the music they study, using the instruments of the various World music orchestras and ensembles in the Department.

Assessment

Written (3000 words): 50%
Exam (2 hours): 50%

Chief examiner(s)

Graeme Smith

Contact hours

3 hours (3 x 1 hour lectures) per week

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study

Music