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Transition signals

Compare Paragraphs 1 and 2. Both give the same information, yet one is easier to follow because it contains transition signals like for example to lead the reader from one idea to the next.

Paragraph 1

A difference among the world's seas and oceans is that the salinity varies in different climate zones. The Baltic Sea in northern Europe is only one quarter as saline as the Red Sea in the Middle East. There are two reasons for this. In warm climates, water evaporates rapidly. The concentration of salt is greater than that in cold climate zones, where water evaporates slowly. In hot areas the surrounding land is dry and does not contribute much fresh water to dilute the salty seawater. The runoff created by melting snow in cold areas adds a considerable amount of fresh water to dilute the saline seawater.

(adapted from Oshima and Hogue, 1999)

Notice that the second paragraph is more coherent. Click on the transition signals in the paragraph below.

Paragraph 2

Another difference among the world's seas and oceans is that the salinity varies in different climate zones. For example, the Baltic Sea in northern Europe is only one quarter as saline as the Red Sea in the Middle East. There are two reasons for this. First of all, in warm climates, water evaporates rapidly; therefore, the concentration of salt is greater than that in cold climate zones, where water evaporates slowly. Secondly, in hot areas the surrounding land is dry and consequently does not contribute much fresh water to dilute the salty seawater. In contrast, the runoff created by melting snow in cold areas adds a considerable amount of fresh water to dilute the saline seawater.

(adapted from Oshima and Hogue, 1999)

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