Accessible version | Skip to content | Change your text size

Table of contents

Previous pageNext page

Coordinators

Coordinators join two independent clauses to form one compound sentence. They cannot be used as transition signals between two sentences containing one independent clause each. Some examples of coordinators are and, but, yet, or, nor, for, so.

Example 1

Example table for independent clause
independent clause independent clause
In cold climates, water evaporates slowly. Melting snow adds runoff to the sea.

Correct

In cold climates, water evaporates slowly and melting snow adds runoff to the sea.

Incorrect

In cold climates water evaporates slowly. And melting snow adds runoff to the sea.

(adapted from Oshima and Hogue, 1999)

Example 2

Example table for independent clause
independent clause independent clause
In hot climates water evaporates quickly. The oceans have higher salinity.

Correct

In hot climates water evaporates quickly, so the oceans have higher salinity.

Incorrect

In hot climates water evaporates quickly. So the oceans have higher salinity.

(adapted from Oshima and Hogue, 1999)



Select the correct method of joining the following sentences.

  1. Traffic-related air pollution is a serious problem in many countries. It is getting worse.
  2. Traffic-related air pollution is a serious problem in many countries. And it is getting worse.

    Traffic-related air pollution is a serious problem in many countries, and it is getting worse.

  3. Bicycle holding rails are now installed at many intersections. Cyclists can stop without having to dismount.
  4. Bicycle holding rails are now installed at many intersections, so cyclists can stop without having to dismount.

    Bicycle holding rails are now installed at many intersections. So cyclists can stop without having to dismount.

word outputDownload a printable version of this page (.doc)
Problems? Questions? Comments? Please provide us feedback.