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Higher Education Partnerships in Communication and Information Technology  

2003

FORUM: FACULTY UPDATES (2)
Educational technology successes and failures

The September HEPCIT Forum continued the theme of recent Faculty successes and failures in the use of educational technologies, with a view to sharing information that may be of benefit to others. In the second forum in this series some experiences of the University’s Global Online Learning Development (GOLD) Program from the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences was highlighted:

These presentations were recorded by Monash Lectures Online; to listen, click here. Requires Real Player which is available as a free download here.

  • Dr Beth Edmondson, Director of the Arts Gold Project presented on ‘Inside the Arts Gold Project - exceptional successes, low failures and patient hard slog.’ (handout, Word)

    The Arts Gold Project has been a truly ambitious undertaking characterised by multiple imperatives and personalities held together by an overarching goal of delivering high quality student centred online learning materials. In this presentation, we looked at our heady moments of high success when our achievements have exceeded our expectations and filled us with hope. We also looked at some of the key problems that have plagued our development, presenting moments of low failure in which patient hard slog has been at least as important as creative problem solving. We examined our use of core pedagogical values and principles alongside issues of optimal design/function in developing high quality student centred online learning materials.

    Dr Beth Edmondson was seconded from her position as Lecturer in History-Politics in the School of Humanities, Communications and Social Sciences at Gippsland Campus to head the Arts Gold Project. Beth has puddled around with educational technologies during the last decade and teaches students at various Monash campuses and partner locations as well as off campus students scattered throughout the world.

  • Jeni Grubb and Professor Margaret O’Connor from the School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, along with Dr Charlotte Brack and Margaret O’Connell from the CeLTS Educational Design Group, presented on ‘Building on experience – lessons learned’. (PowerPoint slides)

    The experiences of developing units for the Bachelor of Nursing (Post-Registration) GOLD project provided good examples of lessons learned and how potential failures can very quickly become successes. We discussed the evaluation of the new unit, NUR1441 Therapeutic Nursing, and outcomes in terms of the impetus for further development in the online environment. NUR2446 Leadership and Management in Nursing Care was an existing unit supported by print material. The GOLD program provided the framework in which to extend support to students through the development of online learning materials. We described the development of this unit and demonstrated some of the outcomes.

    This presentation compared and contrasted these experiences and showed what can be achieved with creativity, commitment and perseverance.

    Jeni Grubb lectures at Gippsland Campus and has long experience in teaching off-campus and offshore. She is Coordinator of the Nursing Masters program. Margaret O’Connor is Vivian Bullwinkel Professor of Nursing (Palliative Care) at the Peninsula Campus. Dr Charlotte Brack and Margaret O’Connell are educational designers working at the Centre for Learning and Teaching Support (CeLTS). They are currently working with a number of faculties in the design and development of a range of units incorporating online and flexible learning strategies.

AUGUST 2003

FORUM: FACULTY UPDATES
Educational technology successes and failures

The August HEPCIT Forum focused on some recent Faculty successes and failures in the use of educational technologies, with a view to sharing information that may be of benefit to others. In the first of these:

  • Professor Sally Joy, Associate Dean (Graduate Studies and Flexible Delivery Developments) in the Faculty of Business and Economics, highlighted lessons learned from Faculty participation in the University’s Global Online Learning Development (GOLD) program. (PowerPoint presentation slides)

    Sally has been involved in flexible delivery and new product development issues for the past decade. In this time she has been involved in a wide range of 'innovative' projects from TV productions to online developments, some more successful than others.

    Sally focused on less successful projects - the lessons learnt the hard way. She also comment on the lessons learnt from GOLD and the ways in which these lessons have been applied. This presentation has provide staff embarking on new initiatives with an understanding of some of the pitfalls and problems faced by innovative projects, and some ways to overcome some of these problems. This session has not provided solutions to all the problems that can arise, but aimed to alert staff to early warning signals and provided some options that may help to reduce wasting time on lost causes so that scarce resources and energy may be most fruitfully directed.

  • Paul Trahair, Flexible Learning Coordinator for the Faculty of Education, explained the rationale and development behind a number of Facultyof Education projects with an online learning focus, commenting on the critical factors involved in successes and failures. (PowerPoint presentation slides.)

    In this presentation, Paul explained the rationale and development behind a number of Faculty of Education projects with an online learning focus, commenting on the critical factors involved in successes and failures. In particular he focused on:

    • a website template for developing online materials for a post-graduate course - its genesis and how it is evolving;
    • a large Faculty strategic development project for the Bachelor of Outdoor Sport and Recreation which involves a complex website that integrates CD- ROM content; and
    • a new WebCT based project, to illustrate how to play it safe by using a template and simple tools, while throwing in a little innovation as well.

MAY 2003

FORUM: Student-Centred Online Learning (2)

Continuing the theme which began with the visit to Monash by Dr Gilly Salmon in February, the May HEPCIT Forum again focused on ways that two Monash staff members are implementing student-centred online learning. Rowena Barrett of the Faculty of Business and Economics described a learning tool which allows students to contribute material to an online tutorial activity. Then Mary Griffiths of the Faculty of Arts demonstrated a Writing web site which pulls together existing web information and web-based discussion groups, provides publishing spaces, and links virtual communities of student writers with professional writers. Details about the forum and the presentations follow.

These presentations were recorded by Monash Lectures Online; to listen, click here. Requires Real Player which is available as a free download here.

  • Rowena Barrett - Placing the Student in the Practice: Understanding the Skills, Roles and Functions Managers Perform. (Powerpoint presentation slides, PDF)

    The tool which Rowena described was built in 2002 as part of the Department of Management’s effort towards internationalising the curriculum and making learning more student-centred. The challenge was to emphasise the geographic and cultural differences in management theory and practice. The online learning tools were built for first year management students with the assistance of CeLTS Educational Design and Multimedia staff, using Cold Fusion, a sophisticated database management system.

    The ‘Interview with a Manager’ tool is the focus of this presentation. This tool builds a powerful and rich Internet application for delivery in the WebCT environment and enables students to contribute material to assist their learning. The basis for this tool is a tutorial activity where students are required to talk to a manager and then report back in class about the manager’s job. This tool formalises this process and allows students to enter data from their ‘live’ interview with a manager which can then be compared with that of the rest of class. By presenting students’ interview data alongside the average response of the rest of the class, this tool helps students to understand the skills, roles and functions managers perform, and also how managerial work differs across firm sizes, sectors, cultures and geographic locations.

    Rowena was the Management subject leader on a Strategic Innovation Fund grant entitled, ‘Curriculum internationalisation and developing a quality flexible learning environment for the Faculty of Business and Economics’ global degree – The B.BusCom’. She is currently Director of the Family and Small Business Research Unit. Until taking up this full-time research position Rowena has been an active teacher engaged in the development and teaching of the first year management curriculum for Business and Economics.

  • Mary GriffithsRedremex: Moderating Online Writing, and Learning Cultural Literacies. (PowerPoint presentation slides)

    The Writing web site which Mary described is an example of a dynamic learning space with multiple pedagogical uses where students can discuss their work, publish and seek advice from professional writers. It also acts as an internationalising initiative. It was the result of a $5000 Arts Teaching Innovation Fund (TIF) grant, designed and developed with the assistance of CeLTS Multimedia Development Unit who offered in-kind additional support to the project. The web site’s database management is another example of a Cold Fusion application.

    The presentation focused on two aspects of the site: developing a collaborative approach to the moderation and uses of the “exhibitions,” and moderation of, and participation in, discussion groups where intercultural, creative and critical literacies are developed.

    Mary heads the Communications & Writing section at Gippsland campus. She was the TIF grant project leader and is now general editor of redremex. Current research includes the social, political and pedagogical uses of new media.

APRIL 2003

FORUM: Student-Centred Online Learning

Following the visit to Monash by Dr Gilly Salmon in February, the April and May HEPCIT Forums focused on ways that some Monash staff members are implementing student-centred online learning. At the April Forum Ainslie Ellis of the Faculty of Information Technology explained how she builds interactivity into online learning and teaching. Following this, Les Hardy and Jodie Maxfield of the Faculty of Business and Economics explained how they are implementing reflective practice as an online learning strategy for students.

This presentation was recorded by MLO, to listen, click here. Requires Real Player which is available as a free download here.

  • Ainslie Ellis - Student-centred learning in an online environment

    A large number of online courses still provide teacher-driven environments, even though they may include online discussion and interactivity. This presentation looked at ways to make the online environment more student-centred and student driven. It included techniques for building and maintaining a student centred-approach and will discuss ways to increase student participation by matching the online environment to students' personality types. Examples from a third year unit 'Issues for human communication on the Internet' were used to illustrate this approach.

    Ainslie is Director of the FLITE* Centre in the Faculty of Information Technology. She has extensive experience of the use of educational technology in her teaching.(*FLITE - Facilitated Learning for Information Technology Education)

  • Les Hardy & Jodie Maxfield - Encouraging student reflection online: past, present and future

    This presentation covered approaches that have been undertaken to encourage reflective practice as part of student learning in an introductory Accounting unit taught on and off-campus in Australia, and also in Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and South Africa. Beginning with the use of computer mediated communication to complement off-campus study materials, the teaching of this unit has progressed to early use of WebCT to facilitate student reflection via WebCT discussion groups, and now to the use of additional software which will allow revision and tracking of students' individual reflections, as well as reflection on the contributions of others as part of student learning. Examples from the unit were used to show how reflection is being encouraged and how it contributes to learning.

    Les and Jodie teach at Gippsland campus in the Department of Accounting and Finance of the Faculty of Business and Economics. They are recipients of a Melbourne-Monash collaborative grant to support the development of the above online initiatives.

FEBRUARY 2003

Gilly Salmon on E-Learning

In February HEPCIT hosted three events by Dr Gilly Salmon of the British Open University Business School from 17-19 February, 2003. Gilly speaks internationally about online learning and teaching and e-learning scenarios for the future and has presented at the major online learning conferences around the world. She is author of the widely-used book E-Moderating: the key to teaching and learning online (2000) and the recently-published E-tivities: the key to active online learning (2002). She is a full time academic in the Centre for Innovation, Knowledge and Enterprise at the Open University Business School based in Milton Keynes and Visiting Professor at Glasgow Caledonian Business School. She is Chair of the Open University's large online Professional Certificate in Management programme. She has research degrees in both change management and educational technology (both of which she says she needs in the e-world!). She has extensive experience of working with students and teachers online and has been teaching online since 1989. More details about Gilly are provided below or visit her web site at http://www.atimod.com/

Gilly presented at a HEPCIT Forum during her visit and also offered two workshops: one on Successful E-moderating and the other on Successful E-tivities.

  1. Forum: An introduction to online learning and teaching

    This forum provided a broad introduction to online learning and teaching from a global perspective, with a particular focus on the rationale for and role of e-moderation and e-tivities. The presentation was recorded by MLO and is available at the following location: http://audio.monash.edu.au/mlo/hepcit/2003-Feb-17_01-35pm.ram. You will need to have Real Player installed to listen to this file. Download the BASIC version free from the Monash ITS website.

    (Accompanying PowerPoint slides to this presentation)

  2. E-moderation workshop: Handouts

    Successful e-moderating: ideas on the role of the online teacher of groups (Word document)

    E-moderator online competencies (Word document)

  3. E-tivities workshop: Handouts

    Successful e-tivities (Word document)

Highlights of previous year's events can be viewed here

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