Employability Symposium Abstracts and Presentations

A Monash Passport depth unit in law - teaching interdisciplinary legal perspectives and group work skills

Abstract
The law does not operate in a vacuum - neither do the disciplines that are taught in university faculty silos. This newly proposed Depth Unit facilitates interdisciplinary learning, providing a richer context for more realistic applications, drawing upon discipline specific expertise united under a common language; the law.

No facets of life operate beyond the law, so law represents a unique uniting paradigm through which to re-examine faculty specific knowledge - a medium for providing interdisciplinary research and learning opportunities for our students.

Modern work practices often involve collaborative projects between colleagues both within and across disciplines; university plagiarism rules and fears almost prohibit group work per se. In this Unit students will be formed into inter-disciplinary groups and instructed on how to work both effectively and accountably in their teams. They will research and then present their findings. Intra-disciplinary groups will then be formed and tasked with collaborating to generate an assessed Work Product for the wider dissemination within their discipline and industry.

This enhanced, contextualised learning of reality beyond silos represents opportunities for enhanced productivity and innovation; generating well rounded graduates with awareness beyond their disciplines thus able to bring extra skills and perspectives to the employer's table and to think outside the traditional square. Further, the aim is for students to be demonstrably able to work both independently and collaboratively in teams.

Action research will be undertaken around this teaching of law to non-lawyers to subsequently inform the teaching of first year law students.

Presentation
A Monash passport depth unit in law (pdf 297kb)

Presenter
Mr Lloyd England, Manager, Student Experience / Teaching Associate, Faculty of Law

Themes
Career readiness for global employment
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development
Social inclusion and diversity

An international intercultural practicum in South Africa for education students

Abstract
This presentation reports on an international teaching practicum in Johannesburg, South Africa, offered to teacher education students by Monash's Faculty of Education. The practicum is supported by partnerships with the Department of Community Engagement in Monash South Africa and the international NGO, Oasis South Africa, as well as schools in Johannesburg.

Since 2009, 37 Monash education students (25 secondary and 12 primary) and two teacher educators have undertaken the three week practicum. Working in collaborative teams, they have taught in a range of multicultural schools and community settings. This teaching has brought them into professional contact with approximately 10,000 children and about 200 teachers and volunteer educators, the majority of whom are from multicultural, low socioeconomic settings.

The practicum begins for the students two months before they fly out of Australia, with a series of workshops where they learn about South African history, culture and educational curriculum and practices. It continues weeks after the students have returned as they write about their experiences in journals and assignments and participate in reflective discussions. Whilst in South Africa, each pre-service teacher is mentored by local South African teachers, and the whole cohort of students regularly participates in peer mentoring sessions under the guidance of their education lecturer from Australia. In research conducted into this practicum project, students overwhelmingly describe their experience as trans formative, resulting in new understandings of education and new understandings of themselves as teachers and global citizens.

Presentation
An international intercultural practicum in South Africa for education students (pdf 1125kb)

Presenter
Dr Graham Parr, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Education

Themes
Career readiness for global employment
Community engagement and service learning
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development
Social inclusion and diversity
Work integrated learning

Application Review Facilitators in Employment and Career Development

Abstract
This presentation discusses the appointment of students to the role of Applications Review Facilitator (ARF) in Employment and Career Development (ECD), an initiative introduced in 2011 and continuing in 2012.

It covers the background to the decision to employ students to be part of a team providing feedback to other students on job application documents. Arrangements for delivery of feedback services, including on-line and face to face drop in service options are outlined. The training undertaken by every student ARF and the ongoing quality assurance measures applied by ECD are briefly described. Benefits of this approach to student skills development are described from the perspective of students using the service, Employment and Career Development as the provider of the service and students currently in the role of Applications Review Facilitator.

Two Application Review Facilitators will talk about their experience; one student in the role over two years and one student appointed this year.

Presentation
Application review facililitators in Employment and Career Development (pdf 548kb)

Presenters
Ms Lynda Rohan, Careers Education Consultant, Employment and Career Development
Tonya Wimhurst, Careers Education Consultant, Employment and Career Development
Alexander Cook, Application Review Facilitator, Employment and Career Development
Nathan Wilson, Application Review Facilitator, Employment and Career Development

Theme
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development

Approaches to broadening student participation in higher education to support positive career outcomes (morning keynote address)

Background
Dr Andrew Block is Monash University Clinical Dean and Head of General Medicine at Dandenong Hospital and Head of Refugee Health Services for the Southern Health Care Network.

Andrew is heavily involved in programs to increase participation of students from disadvantaged backgrounds in medical careers. He developed the "Hands on Health” social inclusion initiative. Over 300 disadvantaged and refugee secondary school students from the Dandenong area enrol each year in work experience programs and tuition to improve their chances for tertiary education. This earned him the 2010 Vice Chancellor’s award for Social Inclusion at Monash University and a Williamson’s Community Leadership Fellowship in the same year.

Presenter
Dr Andrew Block, Monash University Clinical Dean and Head of General Medicine, Dandenong Hospital, and Head of Refugee Health Services, Southern Health Care Network

Theme
Social inclusion and diversity

Begin with the "vocationally orientated graduate employability" end in mind

Abstract
Since Semester 1 2010, Monash Law School has provided a curriculum input - Developing your Employability - to all commencing Law students, supported by Employment and Career Development.

From an initial strategic goal to focus students' minds on the outcome of their degree from the outset and to align behaviours to enhance their employability this session has evolved. Its strategic aims now include to instil into law students a strong foundation for a psycho-social understanding of student self-awareness and to highlight the intersection with opportunity awareness.

This session will focus on the outcomes from this Seminar's development in terms of enhancing students' career readiness for global employment while anticipating and addressing affective concerns of students.

The structure of the input explains and interrogates notions of employability through the lens of "technical" work context (specifically the Legal Industry) and "functional" work content (e.g. soft skills and generic competencies).

It is asserted that this model is highly transferrable and may be used in any discipline by academic faculties to embed career education outcomes within any curricula.

Presentation
Begin with the "vocationally orientated graduate employability" end in mind (pdf 1138kb)

Presenters
Mr Lloyd England, Manager, Student Experience / Teaching Associate, Faculty of Law
Ms Elizabeth Knight, Careers Education Consultant, Employment and Career Development

Theme
Career readiness for global employment

Development of processes and assessment to facilitate a broad multidisciplinary work integrated learning package

Abstract
Work Integrated Learning (WIL) units are often discipline specific and constructed for majors or degrees with a strong vocational orientation. The current paper describes a new undergraduate unit with its genesis in an effective and very successful public relations internship. The original unit enjoyed strong support from industry partners and was instrumental in many graduates securing employment upon or before graduation. The school owning the public relations major also offers majors and degrees in other communications and social sciences disciplines, some vocational and some not.

The school sought to capture the eagerness of students to engage in workplace participation while they were still completing their degrees, but against a backdrop of reducing and consolidating teaching activities creating internships or industry placements for each discipline was out of the question. The principal challenge was to create sufficient genericism without diluting the success enjoyed by the PR internship program or detracting from the need for effective WIL outcomes.

The result was a set of processes and assessments and management practices that could be adopted by any participating discipline. Thus the unit could run every semester and separate disciplines could opt in or out depending upon demand. Efficiencies were to be optimised while still delivering the outcomes desired by students, industry partners, and the academics involved.

Presentations
Development of processes and assessment to facilitate a broad multidisciplinary work integrated learning package

Presenters
Ms Karen Sutherland, Assistant Lecturer, Faculty of Arts

Theme
Work integrated learning

Does communication really matter?

Abstract
Employers say communication skills matter, and through processes and systems such as the generic skills framework, assuring graduate capabilities and so on, universities appear to have recognised and begun to address the issue. But what is the issue? Is it really the case that some graduates leave universities with deficiencies in their communication abilities? Do they struggle with the kinds of writing and communication expected in the workplace? Perhaps it would be better to say that there is sometimes a disjunction between academic expectations around language, and communication and professional discourses, and students are not always prepared specifically for professional communication through their degrees.

This leads to questions about where and when such 'preparation' should occur in the curriculum, if at all. It also opens a 'can of worms' about 'standards' and 'correctness' in grammar. Running counter to popular conceptions of how language works, theories of communication from linguistics, education, literary theory and philosophy suggest that it is anything but a simple matter of 'correctness' and has more to do with questions of social interaction, status, power and change.

In this paper I will explore some of the background to this issue, and how the conflicting demands and expectations of writing, in and out of the university might be negotiated.

Selected references: Marsen, S. 2007. Professional Writing: The Complete guide for Business, Industry and IT. 2nd ed. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. Gee, JP. 2008. Social Linguistics and Literacies: Ideologies in Discourses. 3rd ed. London and New York: Routledge.

Presentation
Does communication really matter (pdf 193kb)

Presenter
Dr Andrew Johnson, Lecturer in Academic and Professional Writing, Faculty of Arts, Academic Language and Learning Unit

Themes
Career readiness for global employment
Social inclusion and diversity
Work integrated learning

Employment and Career Development's social inclusion initiatives

Abstract
This overview of social inclusion initiatives by Employment and Career Development during the last 18 months provides information about the office's programs and how they have accessed staff ability and enhanced students' career readiness. This session will also explore the notion of disability as a social construct and how all students can benefit when programs for people with disabilities are mainstreamed. The programs outlined are: (1) Diversity program (for students and staff), (2) Workplace rights - discrimination and harassment (for students), (3) Disability awareness (for students), (4) Diversity and WiL (for staff).

Presentation
Employment and Career Development's social inclusion initiatives (pdf 737kb)

Presenter
Mr David Eckstein, Careers Education Consultant, Employment and Career Development

Themes
Social inclusion and diversity
Work integrated learning

Employment opportunities in law firms created by law students participating in Monash Oakleigh Legal Service programs

Abstract
The Family Law Assistance Program (FLAP) runs out of Monash Oakleigh Legal Service, a community legal centre funded by Monash Law Faculty. Students can choose the FLAP program as a law elective. The program is funded by the Federal Government and allows clients to be assisted in their Family Law matters up to trial stage by students under the supervision of a lawyer.

The students attend the centre for 17 weeks. Four sessions are run per week at the centre and a duty lawyer service runs each Monday at the Federal Magistrates Court at Dandenong. They gain experience in interviewing clients, learning family law process, learning how to receive instructions, drawing legal documents, learning to communicate effectively by phone, letter, email and fax. They also learn court systems and carry out minor appearances, briefing and instructing barristers and systems in legal offices.

More senior students mentor the junior students in the centre. There have been unforeseen benefits. these are that FLAP has a profile in the court and local law firms, students more readily obtain employment, further Federal funding is attracted and students finishing often return as volunteers to mentor new students..

Presenter
Mr Malcolm Bennett, Lecturer/Supervisor, Family Law Assistance Program, Faculty of Law

Themes
Community engagement and service learning
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development
Work integrated learning

Engaging community healthcare practitioners to enable student nurse placements in the community setting

Abstract
As the mean length of hospital stay is reduced, there is an increasing need to coordinate chronic disease management across community-based health providers. In response to this, Monash University has introduced the Bachelor of Nursing (Community Health). This degree is the first of its kind in Australia, providing both a broad educational foundation for general nursing practice and a focus on delivery of care in the community.

A collaborative research project between Monash University, Dandenong & Casey General Practice Association and Royal District Nursing Service has demonstrated that community-based nurses have valuable expertise to offer and can play a vital role as educators to the next generation of the community nursing workforce. Recruitment into this project involved extensive community engagement with staff in general practice in particular to explain the benefits that a student nurse can offer.

The rewards of preceptorship for the nurse preceptor, the student, and the profession, were evident from those who participated in the research. Nurses highlighted the enjoyment of teaching students, the service that students can provide whilst on placement, and the reinforcement of their own skills and expertise as a nurse. Students were pleased to gain plenty of hands-on experience and exposure to diverse and challenging patient cases, along with a greater understanding of the autonomous role these nurses have in patient care. Following their community placement, many students were considering a career in community nursing.

Presentation
Engaging community healthcare practitioners to enable student nurse placements in the community setting (pdf 718kb)

Presenter
Ms Arlene Parry, Clinical Coordinator/Lecturer, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Themes
Community engagement and service learning
Work integrated learning

Enhancing medical education in rural general practice: a multiple case study method

Abstract
Authors: Morrison T, Bryant M, Brown J, Kassell L, Villanueva E, Nestel D

Introduction: Vertically integrated education is 'the coordinated, purposeful, planned system of linkages and activities in the delivery of education and training throughout the continuum of the learners stages of medical education' (General Practice Education Training, 2004). That is, education is viewed as a continuum for learner groups such as medical students, interns and registrars. The concept is relatively new in general practice. The research team believe there are educational benefits in having three 'levels' of learner in the same general practice. This study aims to identify associated benefits and challenges.

Methodology: We adopted a multiple case study method of six rural general practices. Of these, three have embraced vertical integration and are involved in educating all learner groups. Two practices have one learner group with the one remaining not currently involved in education. Individual interviews with staff, learners and patients were conducted. Audiotapes were transcribed and analysed thematically. Ethics approval was obtained.

Results: 45 interviews of 20-60 minutes duration were conducted. There were 29 females and 16 males aged between 23 and 81 years. Analysis shows educational benefits to learners of vertical integration such as discussion-based structured and unstructured learning sessions, opportunities to teach and learn from peers and the development of a supportive network. Challenges related to time and resource pressures while supervisors are required to be flexible catering for different levels of learner skill and experience.

Conclusion: Vertical integration enhances the educational experience of learners in rural general practice settings..

Presentation
Enhancing medical education in rural general practice: a multiple case study method (pdf 251kb)

Presenter
Dr Tracy Morrison, Assistant Lecturer, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Themes
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development
Work integrated learning

Enhancing relationships with student clubs and societies

Abstract
The aim of this project is to build strong relationships with career focused student groups to encourage greater collaboration with Employment and Career Development. We want to ensure collaboration for the benefit of all concerned.

The main focus at the beginning of the year was to support cohesion between Employment and Career Development and student groups for the commencement of the 2012 graduate recruitment season in order to maximise graduate outcomes for Monash students. This led to a makeover of the graduate careers fair with spectacular outcomes.

We are also seeking ways to maximise consistency in approaches to employer engagement between Employment and Career Development and student groups in order to minimise stakeholder confusion within and outside the university. We are facilitating the connection between employers and industry representatives and student groups by increasing and improving information exchange between parties. By regular face to face, phone and electronic communication we are providing, updating and sharing details of all careers related events for 2012 with the aim of avoiding clashes. We are encouraging student groups to take joint initiative with Employment and Career Development for employer focused, career related activities within Monash University.

Presentation
Enhancing relationships with student clubs and societies (pdf 148kb)

Presenter
Ms Csilla Papp, Employer Relations Consultant, Employment and Career Development

Theme
Career readiness for global employment
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development

Evidencing employability skills: facilitating students' language application to enable positive transition outcomes

Abstract
When preparing for global labour market transitions students are exhorted to meet the needs of behavioural recruitment practices by identifying and addressing their employability skills, particularly the generic or soft skills. However, as identified in practice as Career Education practitioners it is plain that articulating these in a clear and useful manner challenges even highest academically achieving students.

This abstract deals particularly with enhancing the career readiness of students for global employment by improving students ability to smoothly transition into professional graduate employment. Most often within application documents such as resumes and cover letters employability skills are claimed without specifying the context nor giving evidence of the assertion. This is typified by bulleted lists of generic skills claims which lack details and do not add to the persuasiveness of a candidate to recruiters.

With the extensive efforts within our institution to enhance the students' employability skills it is important that students are also supported so they can clearly explain the skills they have developed using suitable language. This approach draws heavily on research by Smart (2004) relating to the importance of "Proof Statements" within transitions and the DOTS model of career development.

In order to confront these difficulties at Employment and Career Development attempts are being made in a number of ways to model appropriate modes of articulating employability skills within application documents which will be discussed in this session.

Presentation
Evidencing employability skills: facilitating students' language application to enable positive transition outcomes (pdf 570kb)

Presenters
Ms Elizabeth Knight, Careers Education Consultant, Employment and Career Development
Ms Judi Green, Career Development Learning Manager, Employment and Career Development

Theme
Career readiness for global employment

Experiences and perceptions of work-based learning: the role of patients

Abstract
Monash University offers an MBBS course for undergraduate and graduate-entry students delivered in urban and rural settings over geographically dispersed sites in Australia and Malaysia. Regardless of location students undertake a significant component of the course as work based learning in clinical settings. Expected learning outcomes are the same across sites and the same assessment activities are undertaken by all students.

We explored the experiences of students in the second clinical year across sites. Students completed surveys and participated in focus groups. Descriptive statistics and thematic analyses were used to determine factors which effect learning in clinical settings, with a focus on interactions with patients.

The results highlight the complexities of learning in clinical environments and challenges to learning in different delivery models of a single MBBS course however students experience similar challenges regardless of site. Learning from patients was usually valued by students, especially when facilitated by clinicians.

Learning from patients in clinical settings is obviously important. In our study, effective learning requires affordance of opportunities to learn from patients together with mediation by an experienced practitioner in the clinical setting. These findings are applicable across national boundaries and may be applicable for other courses in the health care professions.

Presentation
Experiences and perceptions of work-based learning: the role of patients (pdf 733kb)

Presenters
Ms Jennifer Lindley, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Ms Pamela Harvey, Lecturer, Bendigo Regional Clinical School
Ms Katherine Gray, Research Assistant, Gippsland Medical School
Dr Robyn Hill, Previously Director of Curriculum, Gippsland Medical School
Professor Tim Dornan, Professor of Medical Education, Maastricht University (The Netherlands)
Professor Debra Nestel , Professor of Medical Education, Gippsland Medical School

Theme
Work integrated learning

Graduate employability: preparing for career readiness from orientation

Abstract
We were increasingly facing issues of less student engagement. University is one of many competing interests for students, and lesser engagement indicates lower student value of university opportunities. The consequence has tended that the university experience may be appreciated as more transactional or transitional, rather than transformative.

In an attempt to increase the awareness and value of the university experience, and hence engagement and transformation, we initiated a graduate profiling exercise during orientation. The graduate profiling exercise had the main aim to raise the awareness of expected graduate profiles and opportunities available to students to obtain this profile through engagement at university and beyond. The exercise had two steps. First, new students, in small groups, identified graduate employers' expected applicant characteristics, and provided a brief description of each characteristic, from graduate position advertisements. Generally, this concluded a list of 20-30 employability characteristics. Second, groups were assigned 3-4 characteristics. For each characteristic they needed to first, identify the desired goal for graduate profile and second, identify evidence of having achieved the goal. Finally, develop a bullet-point plan to obtain the evidence, and achieve the goal. After the exercise, students were provided with collated profile characteristics and descriptions, and plans to achieve the profiles.

We have run the exercise in three orientations, with evaluated high levels of student value in the exercise. The exercise is planned to become an initial step in a broader partnered transition to university to further support student awareness and engagement to develop their holistic graduate profile.

Presentation
Graduate employability: preparing for career readiness from orientation (pdf 596kb)

Presenter
Dr Glen Croy, Deputy Course Director, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Management

Theme
Career readiness for global employment

Integrating theory and professional practice in designing the curriculum

Abstract
Integrating the workforce atmosphere into the academic curriculum has always been challenging. By developing capstone units at undergraduate and postgraduate level that bring inter-disciplinary concepts together it is possible to demonstrate the importance of theory to students and its relationship to the world of work, especially of students recognise that the capstone unit they are completing also simulates the workplace.

By emphasising the interaction between disciplinary knowledge and the development of graduate attributes in an applied learning environment, graduates learn to understand the importance of their university degree studies prior to entering the workforce. By developing attributes of research and inquiry, information literacy, ethical and professional understanding, personal and intellectual autonomy and communication they learn to understand the importance of developing their skills as ethical and responsible global citizens who work for the good of the business professions and the community.

This paper is based on evidence collected in a simulated treasury dealing room at a Group of Eight University in Australia that researched the effectiveness of simulations in improving learning within the accounting and finance discipline and in preparing graduates for the workforce.

Presentation
Integrating theory and professional practice in designing the curriculum (pdf 1663kb)

Presenter
Dr Kevin Tant, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Accounting and Finance

Themes
Career readiness for global employment
Work integrated learning

Learning to be good

Abstract
An increasing focus on professional behaviours in the clinical workplace has renewed attention to this element of the curriculum in medical education. The group responsible for this area of the medicine curriculum at Monash hosted a forum entitled 'Learning to be Good' to explore issues regarding professional behaviour for students. The forum included representation from across the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences and provided opportunities for attendees to participate in workshops.

The workshops used an action research model to explore issues relating to learning and assessment of professional behaviours in the range of courses in the health care professions. Topics included teaching and learning professionalism in context, translation across professions, assessment and monitoring, and constructing professional identity. Participants included representatives from medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, dietetics and nutrition, radiology and social work. The interdisciplinary nature of the workshop was well received.

This presentation outlines a range of concepts and issues relating to learning and assessment of professional behaviours which were evident across the health care professions and may be applicable to other vocational areas. These included both structural and educational issues, such as engaging staff and developing professional identity, and highlighted common concerns that may serve as an excellent starting point for cross-discipline intervention.

Presentation
Learning to be good (pdf 99kb)

Presenters
Ms Jennifer Lindley, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Dr Erica Schmidt, Lecturer, Student Academic Support Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Dr Andrew Block, Director Medical Student Programs, Dandenong Hospital Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine Nursing and Health Sciences

Themes
Career readiness for global employment
Work integrated learning

Monash Alumni-Student Mentoring Program

Abstract
The Monash Alumni-Student Mentoring Program matches current students (penultimate and final year) from across all faculties with experienced Monash alumni professionals from all corners of the globe and all walks of life. Its core aim is to strengthen the links between our graduates, industry and current students. The current program is managed by the Monash Alumni Relations office. It builds on a successful program run by Monash alumni for more than 10 years.

It provides a platform for participants to share professional and life experiences, industry information and networks. With an emphasis on career and work-life mentoring, the mentors' role is to inspire, inform, encourage and guide students through the transformation from study to employment, enhancing their career readiness. Participants are trained and supported throughout the program so that effective and mutually beneficial mentoring partnerships can be formed.

Presentation
Monash Alumni-Student Mentoring Program (pdf 334 kb)

Presenters
Ms Vivienne Wittwer, Alumni Relations Manager, Alumni Relations
Ms Kristina Vukusic, Alumni Programs Coordinator

Themes
Career readiness for global employment
Community engagement and service learning
Social inclusion and diversity

MBBS Community Based Practice Program - a unique module for community based learning

Abstract
The MBBS Community Based Practice (CBP) program is an integral component of the Year 2 undergraduate medical curriculum. The program provides students with an opportunity to gain a unique learning experience off campus, based within a community organisation involved in the provision of health services, education and social care to individuals often from socially disadvantaged groups with diverse needs.

The program extends over two semesters comprising 14 days to undertake the many activities the community organisation has to offer. Key components of the CBP program are: (1) practical involvement with clients; (2) gaining an understanding of how the community organisations deliver their services; (3) engagement within an interprofessional environment and (4) working on and observing health promotion activities.

The placement experience is the first time the students interact with the community as trainee health professionals, and is an important part of their development both personally and professionally. Although the student's placement experiences vary between organisations, the key connection is that they all have opportunities to observe real life examples of social justice and equity and the diversity of client needs in action.

Student evaluations since the CBP program's inception show that the students highly value the variety and quality of the placements and the opportunities that the program provides in personal and professional development.

The CBP program has evolved to be a flagship program within the MBBS curriculum and is a unique module for community based learning within Australian undergraduate medical curricula.

Presentation
MBBS Community Based Practice Program (pdf 1209kb)

Presenter
Ms Nicky Peters, Assistant Lecturer, CBP Program Academic Course Coordinator, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Themes
Community engagement and service learning
Social inclusion and diversity
Work integrated learning

PASS: Building learning partnerships for academic success

Abstract
Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) is a program of weekly study sessions to support first year students in targeted key units. Successful senior students (2nd Year and above) are trained as 'PASS Leaders' to facilitate the weekly study sessions for groups of 6 - 16 students. PASS sessions are "super group study sessions", providing the first year students with the benefits of an active and collaborative approach to learning under the guidance of a student mentor.

The PASS Leader is a facilitator rather than teacher. Utilising a wide range of communication, cross-cultural, leadership, time management and organisational skills, the PASS Leader must foster the development of learning partnerships with and between the first year students. These learning partnerships are at the core of PASS: students engaging with each other and with the course material to develop the skills for success in higher education and a greater understanding of and confidence with key concepts. PASS encourages first year students to take critical and creative approaches to problem solving through effective communication and teamwork. In addition to these being Monash graduate attributes, they are also amongst the skills most desired of Monash graduates by major employers of Monash graduates (Monash University 2007 Employer Survey Report).

In this session, PASS Leaders from BusEco, Engineering, IT and Law will give their perspectives on the skills they and their students have gained from the PASS Program, and the ways in which those skills have, or will assist them in their intended careers, whether academic or employment.

Presentation
PASS: Building learning partnerships for academic success (pdf 475kb)

Presenters
Mr Adrian Devey, Project Manager, Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education)
Ms Jamila Bird, PASS Leader, Faculty of Engineering
Ms Yanxia Chen, PASS Leader, Faculty of Business and Economics
Ms Chantel Garcia, PASS Leader, Faculty of Information Technology
Mr Michael Stern, PASS Leader, Faculty of Law

Theme
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development

Preparing future leaders: The Monash MBA and experiential learning

Abstract
The Monash MBA is a business degree for future leaders who believe that business should be done better. The ability to engage stakeholders, lead innovation and change, and inspire colleagues and teams to reach their full potential is of paramount importance to the success of leaders, managers, and ultimately their organisations. It is essential that future business and community leaders develop their awareness and capacity to make difficult decisions in an ethical framework.

With these principles at the heart of the Monash MBA philosophy, the Monash MBA Program provides a comprehensive set of learning experiences for our students, from the academic curriculum of mastering business fundamentals, to integrating units, such as the changing context of business, critical thinking, and negotiation, to the compulsory co-curricular MBA Leadership and Personal Development Program, which includes a number of activities around reflective leadership, psychometric profiling, developing media skills, and the high-level Cranlana Colloquium leadership program, designed to enhance the understanding of the philosophical, ethical and social issues necessary to create a fair, prosperous and sustainable society.

The capstone of the Monash MBA is an experiential learning component that takes the qualitative and analytical skills covered in the preceding academic units of the program, as well as the personal lessons of the Leadership and Personal Development Program, and hones these in the context of a defined 'live' project. Students solve a real business problem and deliver possible solutions to the host organisation. The corporate project comprises three elements: developing consulting skills; completion of a syndicate-group Community Corporate Project (with students from other business schools around the world) in the not-for-profit or community sector and; an Individual Corporate Project - an 'in company' project that students complete individually.

The design of the Corporate Project capstone to encompass both corporate and community/not-for-profit organisations is consistent with the broader aims of the Monash MBA Program to develop future leaders, and the recognition that business and its leaders are situated in the wider community, and hence have an obligation to that community.

Presentation
Preparing future leaders: The Monash MBA and experiential learning (pdf 574kb)

Presenter
Dr Jane Holcombe, Monash MBA Program Manager, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Management

Themes
Career readiness for global employment
Community engagement and service learning
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development
Work integrated learning

The characteristics of Monash student volunteers

Abstract
In September 2011, a survey on student volunteering at Monash was conducted as a result of the Oxfam Australia-Monash Collaboration partnership to provide a potential baseline for Monash and Oxfam in the development of strategies to engage different groups in the student population. The survey was emailed to over 10,500 students who expressed interest in volunteering as determined by their profile on Monash's Career Gateway and Volunteer Gateway databases.

The survey (Monash Ethics Approval CF11/2571 - 2011001501) was designed to identify a number of aspects relating to student volunteering at Monash, including: basic patterns of volunteering; the benefits and outcomes of volunteering; and the factors that impede or support a student's decision to volunteer.

This presentation discusses the responses, recommendations for volunteer support, and the practicalities for encouraging participation in volunteer opportunities from students from diverse and under-represented communities.

In addition the outcomes of a concurrent trial of staff volunteering within the Faculty of IT will also be discussed and the importance of Monash promoting and supporting social justice across the entire University can be achieved.

Presentation
The characteristics of Monash student volunteers (pdf 563kb)

Presenters
Dr Larry Stillman, Senior Research Fellow, Oxfam Australia-Monash Collaboration
Ms Cait Ryan, Project Manager Volunteer Operations, Office of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Education)

Themes
Community engagement and service learning
Social inclusion and diversity

The inexact science of targeting low SES students: library programs developed to enhance participation, retention and success

Abstract
The Bradley Review (2008) has led to a raft of changes at Australian universities in the way they approach social inclusion. The Federal Government's Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program (HEPPP), to be utilised as universities see fit, is a prime example. The objective of HEPPP funding is to increase the access, participation, retention and success of low socioeconomic status (low SES) students with target numbers fixed. Each Monash faculty receives a proportionate amount of the HEPPP fund and the University's Library successfully applied for a share, using it to employ two staff members from July 2011 until the end of 2013.

The aim for these employees, a Subject Librarian and a Learning Skills Adviser, is to develop programs across all ten faculties which address the aforementioned HEPPP goals from a Library perspective and with a collegial approach. Programs need to be sustainable so that future students can gain access and benefit from currently developed approaches.

Whilst there have been some demonstrable success stories to date, the most significant challenge has been targeting the appropriate cohort accurately and with the necessary sensitivity. How can the objectives be achieved without stigmatising those whom one sets out to support, and also without stepping on faculty and indeed library staff member toes?

The presentation will provide background, discuss the pitfalls and successes the Library has encountered thus far in targeting low SES students and will conclude with a view towards the future and what it may hold for this and other HEPPP initiatives.

Presentation
The inexact science of targeting low SES students: library programs developed to enhance participation, retention and success (pdf 1156kb)

Presenter
Mr Damian Gleeson, Learning Skills Adviser (HEPPP), Monash University Library

Theme
Social inclusion and diversity

The Monash South Africa approach to community engagement and service learning (afternoon keynote address)

Background
Craig Rowe is Head of Community Engagement at Monash South Africa (MSA).

His office has many achievements including renovating creches and community centre buildings; planting community vegetable gardens in surrounding informal settlement communities; developing, with MSA's Faculty of Information Technology, the "Digital Doorway" project situated in the informal settlement, Zandspruit; resourcing and managing MSA's "Saturday School" for children from surrounding low socioeconomic communities; developing and sustaining strategic partnerships with diverse schools in the Johannesburg area and with community organisations and establishing the Krishna Khetia Library across two informal settlement primary schools: Mazakhane and Zandspruit.

South Africa faces many challenges including poverty, housing, HIV/AIDS, unemployment and disparity in education. Le Grange (2007) suggests that educating students about these problems can be dangerous, because students learn just enough about the problems to pass their examinations, without having to do anything about the challenges. Service learning and community engagement, he suggests, is a strategy that is positioned to produce powerful transformative effects for students, universities and communities.

Hlengwa (2010) views service learning as having the potential to create a balance between service, the community and learning, thereby enabling students to move between the everyday discourses of the community into the elevated discourses of the university.

Presentation
The Monash South Africa approach to community engagement and service learning (1560kb)

Presenter
Mr Craig Rowe, Head of Community Engagement, Monash South Africa

Theme
Community engagement and service learning

The Professional Transitions series

Abstract
Summary: The Professional Transitions Series has been developed by Employment and Career Development (ECD) in conjunction with faculties. The series aims to increase student's ability, confidence and motivation to transition professionally from their studies into global employment. The series focuses on capacity building in career planning, employment seeking strategies and developing a professional profile. The programs have a delivery strategy which fits in with the Faculty's needs and student requirements. Delivery includes face-to-face activities (delivered by ECD, faculty staff and industry) and online materials. The consistency of branding with faculty sub-branding has added prominence and uptake to the program.

Benefits to students: (1) Received a certificate of participation, (2) Developed knowledge and skills to improve the transition between study and global employment, (3) Expanded their insights into the nature of graduate jobs, (4) Increased their global employability skills while studying, (5) Received a purpose built program, with information integrated with course direction, (6) Presenters had an industry specific focus.

Benefits to employers: (1) Access to students in their target discipline, (2) Students submitted better applications, (3) New opportunities to contribute to student knowledge of their industry and profile their organisation.

Benefits to Monash University: (1) Faculties increased participation and knowledge of graduate employment, (2) The program encouraged the students to broaden their community participation, contributing to the development of 'well rounded, employment ready' graduates, (3) Students will more actively and successfully apply for graduate work, improving graduate outcomes.

Presentation
The professional transitions series (pdf 562kb)

Presenters
Ms Judi Green, Career Development Learning Manager , Employment and Career Development
Ms Carolyn Hindmarsh, Careers Education Consultant, Employment and Career Development

Theme
Career readiness for global employment

The Science-Industry Student Research Placement Program

Abstract
The Monash Science Student-Industry Placement Program (SSIPP) was established to provide short-term, research-based industry placements for participants in the Science Talented Students Program. The rationale for SSIPP is based on (i) facilitating industry experience for upper undergraduate students; (ii) building collaborations in work integrated learning between Monash and industry partners; (iii) furthering science and its broader communication.

The project, which strongly aligns with the Monash Passport, has achieved a number of milestones, including network building with industry partners, completed placements, and the development of resources to support the program and evaluate its impact and effectiveness. To date, placements have been completed with the Department of Primary Industries, the University of Ballarat and Melbourne Water, and further projects are in development with the Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO and Department of Sustainability and Environment. Developed program resources include workplace agreements, evaluation surveys for students and placement supervisors, and importantly, establishment of a Monash Co-curriculum Research Program Passport Unit for participants. Evaluation of placements by participants and industry partners validates the program's considerable value with respect to its original aims.

Future aspirations for the program include building further capacity with industry partners and broadening its reach to other equally capable and enthusiastic students. Ideally, this type of program would provide an opportunity for all science students to apply their knowledge, contribute to scientific endeavour and demonstrate the ability and considerable value of Monash undergraduates as outstanding employees and researchers.

Presentation
The Science-Industry Student Research Placement Program (pdf 157kb)

Presenter
Dr Gerry Rayner, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Science, School of Biological Sciences

Theme
Work integrated learning

The virtuous circle effect of usage of graduate employment destination data

Abstract
Every year Australian universities survey recent graduates through the Graduate Careers Association's Australian Graduate Survey. A key item of data returned is first employment destination of the graduates. This session will discuss methods where the strategic operational deployment of this employment destination data can have the effect of improving employability outcomes by raising career planning awareness and promoting survey return by Monash students.

This session will specifically outline one of the main ways that the data is transformed by Employment and Career Development staff into useful resources for career education work within Monash University. It will focus on the methods and purposes of production of faculty and course specific "AGS handouts" which provide current students with a sample of relevant employment destinations, previous job titles and industry sectors related to their area of study, as drawn from the Monash responses in the AGS dataset.

The function of these leaflets is to model potential career outcomes for students and present a key source for opportunity awareness as well as career inspiration. They can also be helpful when used as a standalone resource for the students to access on electronically. Their dissemination and use by faculty representatives is encouraged.

This session aims to promote faculty usage, share information on how the leaflets are developed and describe the employability benefits when faculties embed the information within their curriculum resources.

Presentation
The virtuous circle effect of usage of graduate employment destination data (pdf 928kb)

Presenters
Ms Jahna Pulford, Career Education Consultant, Employment and Career Development
Ms Elizabeth Knight, Career Education Consultant, Employment and Career Development

Theme
Career readiness for global employment

Two student engagement programs in the Faculty of Science

Abstract
The Faculty of Science aims to equip students with a range of "employability skills" to complement their academic abilities and to enhance their workplace readiness. The faculty co-ordinates two programs, the In2science Peer Mentoring program and the Science Student Ambassadors program. Both create the opportunity for students to put into practice skills such as communication, teamwork and planning and organising.

This presentation will describe the running of the programs and refer to evaluations.

The In2science Peer Mentoring program is a collaborative project with six other universities, which places current university students in science or mathematic classes in State Government schools with teachers from years 5 - 10. The mentors attend the class at an assigned time and day for 10 weeks.

The Science Student Ambassador program engages current students to assist the marketing of the Science Faculty. For students to be selected as an ambassador, they make a written application and then attend a range of skills development and leadership workshops, including public speaking. They demonstrate their abilities by participating at events, such as Open Day, school visits and careers evenings.

By students participating in either program, they are engaging in science communication. Their volunteering in various settings helps them to identify their own skills set. They can demonstrate how they have stepped out of their comfort zone and can incorporate their experiences into their resumes to make their applications attractive to future employers.

Presentation
Two student engagement programs in the Faculty of Science (pdf 204kb)

Presenter
Ms Catherine Higgins, In2science Co-ordinator, Faculty of Science

Theme
Community engagement and service learning

Working and learning in and with diverse communities

Abstract
This presentation features a community engagement and service learning project in a diverse community that promotes social inclusion. It describes how this learning partnership enhances student skill development to make them career ready. Integrating learning with diverse communities not only prepares students for the workforce but in the case of the Enhanced Learning In Networked Communities Project (ELINCs) it actually gets them jobs. This presentation will feature a number of graduates who will talk about their participation in the ELINCs project and the benefits they derived from community engagement in making them career ready to work for social inclusion. It will also include a video that highlights the work that our students do.

Presentation
Working and learning in and with diverse communities (pdf 464kb)

Presenters
Dr David Zyngier, Senior lecturer, Faculty of Education
Sara Connerty, Teacher, Noble Park Primary School (and former Monash student)

Themes
Career readiness for global employment
Community engagement and service learning
Learning partnerships - student to student skill development
Social inclusion and diversity
Work integrated learning

Workplace training for Bachelor of Environmental Science students

Abstract
The Faculty of Science Workplace Training Scheme provides all students who have completed the third year of a Bachelor of Environmental Science degree, an opportunity to undertake work placement in a relevant industry, coupled with some formal pre-placement training.

The aim of the program is to improve the student experience and to provide information and opportunities for summer vacation work, industry placements and career advice. Students can participate in any aspect of the program, if not all.

The program is structured in the following way: (A) Students engage with Employment and Career Development and faculty support to produce a CV and job application which is vetted and feedback provided. (B) The faculty approaches a range of organisations to assist students make professional links and match with interested employers. This entails student submission of a formal job application followed by interview and engagement processes. Preparing for an interview is handled through Employment and Career Development. (C) Prior to entering a workplace, students undertake a 3-day training program, which prepares them for the workplace and exposes them to the range of opportunities, experiences and career development that future employment provides. Particular emphasis is given to leadership and negotiation skills plus exposure to guest environmental scientist presentations on 'career journeys' across various environmental science study streams. A multiple perspective panel is also compiled for student benefit on a current environmental issue.

This presentation will describe the overall Faculty of Science work placement experience including student profiles and experiences.

Presentation
Workplace training for Bachelor of Environmental Science students (pdf 570kb)

Presenter
Mr Ian Stevenson, Adjunct Lecturer, Faculty of Science

Theme
Work integrated learning